And so the Diary ends ……. — Suffragette Diary – Reblog

……… with this poem Life and Death Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. * In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced or cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, […]

via And so the Diary ends ……. — Suffragette Diary

My friend Sally, from the WordPress blog My Beautiful Things, found a Suffragette’s Diary in her father’s papers and has transcribed it.  I had never read this poem before.  I have found it more powerful than the coffee I’m drinking to wake up this morning! Hope you find this the same and will check out the rest of the diary – important piece of history. – main page

Suffragette Diary

On July 11th 2009, while sorting some of my late Father’s papers, I came across an envelope marked Suffragette’s Diary and I began to read. Serendipity indeed – the entries began on July 12th 1909, almost exactly one hundred years ago to the day I discovered it.

What follows is a transcript of the Diary, written by an unknown Suffragette, who was imprisoned in Holloway , along with a number of other window breakers  I have tried to track her down as the last post will explain. What follows is the diary, day by day as written by our Suffragette.

As my Great Grandmother, Mrs Wiseman, was a Suffragette and also imprisoned in Holloway, I have a particular interest. My Great Granny’s name can be found here in the Roll of Honour of Suffragette Prisoners 1905 – 1014

What was a Suffragette?


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Annie Kenney and Christabel Pankhurst used violent tactics in Britain as members of the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU)

Suffragettes were members of women’s organizations in the late-19th and early-20th centuries which advocated the extension of the “franchise“, or the right to vote in public elections, to women. It particularly refers to militants in the United Kingdom such as members of the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU). Suffragist is a more general term for members of the suffrage movement, particularly those advocating Women’s suffrage.

The term suffragette is particularly associated with activists in the British WSPU, led by Emmeline Pankhurst, who were influenced by Russian methods of protest such as hunger strikes. Although the Isle of Man had enfranchised women who owned property to vote in parliamentary (Tynwald) elections in 1881, New Zealand was the first self-governing country to grant all women the right to vote in 1893 when women over the age of 21 were permitted to vote in parliamentary elections.[1] Women in South Australia achieved the same right and became the first to obtain the right to stand for parliament in 1895.[2] In the United States, white women over the age of 21 were allowed to vote in the western territories of Wyoming from 1869 and in Utah from 1870. But by 1903 women in Britain had still not been enfranchised, and Pankhurst had decided the movement would have to become radical and militant if it was going to be effective. The campaign became increasingly bitter, with property damage and hunger strikes being countered by the authorities with jailing and force-feeding, until it was suspended due to the outbreak of war in 1914.

Women in Britain over the age of 30, meeting certain property qualifications, were given the right to vote in 1918, and in 1928 suffrage was extended to all women over the age of 21.[3] Opinion amongst historians today is divided as to whether the militant tactics of the suffragettes helped or hindered their cause.


British suffragettes were mostly women from upper- and middle-class backgrounds, frustrated by their social and economic situation. Their struggles for change within society, along with the work of such advocates for women’s rights as John Stuart Mill, were enough to spearhead a movement that would encompass mass groups of women fighting for suffrage. Mill introduced the idea of women’s suffrage on the platform he presented to the British electorate in 1865.[4] He was subsequently joined by numerous men and women fighting for the same cause.

The term “suffragette” was first used as a term of derision by the journalist Charles E. Hands in the London Daily Mail to describe activists in the movement for women’s suffrage, in particular members of the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU).[5] But the women he intended to ridicule embraced the term, saying “suffraGETtes” (hardening the g) implied not only that they wanted the vote, but that they intended to get it.[6]

The National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies, founded in 1897, was formed from local suffrage societies. The union was led by Millicent Fawcett, who believed in constitutional campaigning, issuing leaflets, organising meetings and presenting petitions but the campaign had little effect. In 1903 Emmeline Pankhurst founded a new organisation, the Women’s Social and Political Union. She thought the movement would have to become radical and militant if it was going to be effective. The Daily Mail gave them the name “Suffragettes”.[7]

Some radical techniques used by the suffragettes, especially hunger strikes, were learned from Russian exiles from tsarism who had escaped to England.[8] Many suffragists at the time, and some historians since, have argued that the actions of the militant suffragettes damaged their cause.[9] Opponents at the time saw evidence that women were too emotional and could not think as logically as men.[10][11][12][13][14]

Early 20th century in the UK[edit]

Memorial edition of The Suffragette newspaper dedicated to Emily Davison

From 1909, the “Pank-A-Squith” board game was sold by the WSPU to raise awareness of their campaign and raise money. The name is derived from “Pankhurst”, the surname of the leaders of the WSPU, and Asquith, the surname of the Prime Minister at the time and a largely hated figure by the movement. The board game is set out in a spiral, and players must lead their suffragette figure from their home to parliament, past the obstacles faced from Prime Minister H. H. Asquith and the Liberal government. The People’s History Museum in Manchester has a “Pank-A-Squith” board game on display in the main galleries and replica version for visitors to play.[15]

7 October 1913 edition of The Suffragette

Also in 1909, suffragettes Solomon and McLellan tried an innovative method of potentially obtaining a meeting with Asquith -by sending themselves by Royal Mail courier post. However Downing street was unwilling to accept the parcel.[16]

1912 was a turning point for the British suffragettes as they turned to using more militant tactics, chaining themselves to railings, setting fire to post box contents, smashing windows and occasionally detonating bombs.[17] In 1914, at least seven churches were bombed or set on fire across the United Kingdom, including an explosion in Westminster Abbey aimed at destroying the 700-year-old Coronation Chair, which despite its proximity to the bomb, survived with only minor damage.[18]

One suffragette, Emily Davison, died under the King‘s horse Anmer at The Derby on 4 June 1913. It is debated whether she was trying to pin a “Votes for Women” banner on the King’s horse or not.[19] Many of her fellow suffragettes were imprisoned and refused food as a scare tactic against the government. The Liberal government of the day led by Asquith responded with the Cat and Mouse Act. Another prominent British suffragette, Sophia Duleep Singh, was almost forgotten for 70 years.[20]


Emmeline Pankhurst was the most prominent of Britain’s suffragettes.

In the early-20th century until the First World War, approximately one thousand suffragettes were imprisoned in Britain.[21] Most early incarcerations were for public order offences and failure to pay outstanding fines. The first suffragettes to be imprisoned were Christabel Pankhurst (daughter of Emmeline Pankhurst) and Annie Kenney in October 1905.[22] While incarcerated, suffragettes lobbied to be considered political prisoners; with such a designation, suffragettes would be placed in the First Division as opposed to the Second or Third Division of the prison system, and as political prisoners would be granted certain freedoms and liberties not allotted to other prison divisions, such as being allowed frequent visits and being allowed to write books or articles.[23] Because of a lack of consistency between the different courts, suffragettes would not necessarily be placed in the First Division and could be placed in Second or Third Division, which enjoyed fewer liberties.

This cause was taken up by the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), a large organisation in Britain, that lobbied for women’s suffrage led by militant suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst.[24] The WSPU campaigned to get imprisoned suffragettes recognised as political prisoners. However, this campaign was largely unsuccessful. Citing a fear that the suffragettes becoming political prisoners would make for easy martyrdom,[25] and with thoughts from the courts and the Home Office that they were abusing the freedoms of First Division to further the agenda of the WSPU,[22] suffragettes were placed in Second Division, and in some cases the Third Division, in prisons with no special privileges granted to them as a result.[26]

Arson, property damage and domestic terrorism[edit]

Throughout the woman’s suffrage movement, many tactics were employed in order to achieve the goals of the movement. Throughout Britain, the contents of hundreds of letter boxes were set alight or corrosive acids or liquids poured over the letters and postcards inside, and thousands of shop and office windows were smashed with hammers. Telephone wires were cut, and graffiti slogans began appearing on the streets. Places that wealthy people, typically men, frequented were also burnt and destroyed, including cricket pitches, golf courses and horse racing tracks. Pinfold Manor in Surrey, which was being built for Lloyd-George, was targeted with two bombs on 19/2/13, only one of which exploded, causing significant damage. (In her memoirs, Sylvia Pankhurst claimed that Emily Davison carried out the attack.) There were 250 arson or destruction attacks in a six month period in 1913. Reports exist in the Parliamentary Papers, which includes lists of the ‘incendiary devices’, explosions, artwork destruction (including an axe attack upon a painting of The Duke of Wellington in the National Gallery), arson attacks, window-breaking, post box burning and telegraph cable breaking that occurred during the most militant years from 1910-1914.

Hunger strikes[edit]

Suffragettes were not recognised as political prisoners and many of them staged hunger strikes while they were imprisoned. The first woman to refuse food was Marion Wallace Dunlop, a militant suffragette who was sentenced to a month in Holloway for vandalism in July 1909.[27] Without consulting suffragette leaders such as Pankhurst,[28] Dunlop refused food in protest at being denied political prisoner status. After a 91-hour hunger strike, and for fear of her becoming a martyr,[28] the Home Secretary Herbert Gladstone decided to release her early on medical grounds.[22] Dunlop’s strategy was adopted by other suffragettes who were incarcerated.[29] It became common practice for suffragettes to refuse food in protest for not being designated as political prisoners, and as a result they would be released after a few days and could return to the “fighting line”.[30]

After a public backlash regarding the prison status of suffragettes, the rules of the divisions were amended. In March 1910, Rule 243A was introduced by the Home Secretary Winston Churchill, allowing prisoners in Second and Third Divisions to be allowed certain privileges of the First Division, provided they were not convicted of a serious offence, effectively ending hunger strikes for two years.[31] Hunger strikes began again when Pankhurst was transferred from the Second Division to the First Division, inciting the other suffragettes to demonstrate regarding their prison status.[32]

Militant suffragette demonstrations subsequently became more aggressive,[22] and the British Government took action. Unwilling to release all the suffragettes refusing food in prison,[29] in the autumn of 1909, the authorities began to adopt more drastic measures to manage the hunger-strikers.


Poster by “A Patriot”, showing a suffragette prisoner being force-fed, 1910.

In September 1909, the Home Office became unwilling to release hunger-striking suffragettes before their sentence was served.[30] Suffragettes became a liability because if they were to die in custody, the prison would be responsible for their death. Prisons began the practice of force-feeding the hunger strikers through a tube, most commonly via a nostril or stomach tube or a stomach pump.[29] Force-feeding had previously been practised in Britain but its use had been exclusively for patients in hospitals who were too unwell to eat or swallow food. Despite the practice being deemed safe by medical practitioners for sick patients, it posed health issues for the healthy suffragettes.[28]

Memories of Winson Green September 18, 1909; Illustration from Mabel Cappers WSPU prisoners scrapbook

The process of tube-feeding was strenuous without the consent of the hunger strikers, who were typically strapped down and force-fed via stomach or nostril tube, often with a considerable amount of force.[33] The process was painful and after the practice was observed and studied by several physicians, it was deemed to cause both short-term damage to the circulatory system, digestive system and nervous system and long-term damage to the physical and mental health of the suffragettes.[34] Some suffragettes who were force-fed developed pleurisy or pneumonia as a result of a misplaced tube.[35]


In April 1913, Reginald McKenna of the Home Office passed the Prisoners (Temporary Discharge for Ill Health) Act 1913, or the Cat and Mouse Act as it was commonly known. The act made the hunger strikes legal, in that a suffragette would be temporarily released from prison when their health began to diminish, only to be readmitted when she regained her health to finish her sentence.[33] The act enabled the British Government to be absolved of any blame resulting from death or harm due to the self-starvation of the striker and ensured that the suffragettes would be too ill and too weak to participate in demonstrative activities while not in custody.[29] Most women continued hunger striking when they were readmitted to prison following their leave.[36] After the Act was introduced, force-feeding on a large scale was stopped and only women convicted of more serious crimes and considered likely to repeat their offences if released were force-fed.[37]

The Bodyguard[edit]

In early 1913 and in response to the “Cat and Mouse Act”, the WSPU instituted a society of women known as the “Bodyguard” whose role was to physically protect Emmeline Pankhurst and other prominent suffragettes from arrest and assault. Known members included Katherine Willoughby Marshall and Gertrude Harding; Edith Margaret Garrud was their jujutsu trainer. Members of the “Bodyguard” participated in several violent actions against the police in defence of their leaders.[38]

The origin of the “Bodyguard” can be traced to a WSPU meeting at which Garrud spoke. As suffragettes speaking in public increasingly found themselves the target of violence and attempted assaults, teaching jujitsu was a way for women to defend themselves against angry hecklers.[39] Incidents including Black Friday, at which 200 suffragettes were assaulted by police, served to illustrate the need for militant women to be able to defend themselves against male violence.

World War[edit]

At the commencement of the First World War, the suffragette movement in Britain moved away from suffrage activities and focused their efforts on the war effort, and as a result, hunger strikes largely stopped.[40] In August 1914, the British Government released all prisoners who had been incarcerated for suffrage activities on an amnesty,[41] with Pankhurst ending all militant suffrage activities soon after.[42] The suffragettes’ focus on war work turned public opinion in favour of their eventual partial enfranchisement in 1918.[43]

Women eagerly volunteered to take on many traditional male roles – leading to a new view of what women were capable of. The war also caused a split in the British suffragette movement; the mainstream, represented by Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst’s WSPU calling a ceasefire in their campaign for the duration of the war, while more radical suffragettes, represented by Sylvia Pankhurst‘s Women’s Suffrage Federation continued the struggle.

The National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies, which had always employed “constitutional” methods, continued to lobby during the war years and compromises were worked out between the NUWSS and the coalition government.[44] On 6 February, the Representation of the People Act 1918 was passed, enfranchising women over the age of 30 who met minimum property qualifications as well as men over 21 – before this not all British men were enfranchised.[45] About 8.4 million women gained the vote.[45] In November 1918, the Parliament (Qualification of Women) Act 1918 was passed, allowing women to be elected into parliament.[45] The Representation of the People Act 1928 extended the voting franchise to all women over the age of 21, granting women the vote on the same terms that men had gained ten years earlier.[46]


Nineteen-year-old Fay Hubbard selling suffragette papers in New York, 1910

Historians generally argue that the first stage of the militant suffragette movement under the Pankhursts in 1906 had a dramatic mobilizing effect on the suffrage movement. Women were thrilled and supportive of an actual revolt in the streets; the membership of the militant WSPU and the older NUWSS overlapped and were mutually supportive. However a system of publicity, Ensor argues, had to continue to escalate to maintain its high visibility in the media. The hunger strikes and force-feeding did that. However, the Pankhursts refused any advice and escalated their tactics. They turned to systematic disruption of Liberal Party meetings as well as physical violence in terms of damaging public buildings and arson. Searle says the methods of the suffragettes did succeed in damaging the Liberal party but failed to advance the cause of women’s suffrage. When the Pankhursts decided to stop the militancy at the start of the war, and enthusiastically support the war effort, the movement split and their leadership’s role ended. Suffrage did come four years later, but the feminist movement in Britain permanently abandoned the militant tactics that had made the suffragettes famous.[47][48]

Whitfield concludes that the militant campaign had some positive effects in terms of attracting enormous publicity, and forcing the moderates to better organize themselves, while also stimulating the organization of the antis. He concludes:

The overall effect of the suffragette militancy, however, was to set back the cause of women’s suffrage. For women to gain the right to vote it was necessary to demonstrate that they had public opinion on their side, to build and consolidate a parliamentary majority in favor of women’s suffrage and to persuade or pressure the government to introduce its own franchise reform. None of these objectives was achieved.[49]


Gold ear rings in suffragette colours

Pendant presented to Louise Eates in 1909

From 1908, the WSPU adopted the colour scheme of violet, white and green: violet symbolised dignity, white purity, and green hope. These three colours were used for banners, flags, rosettes and badges, They also would carry heart shaped vesta cases, and appeared in newspaper cartoons and postcards.[50]

Mappin & Webb, the London jewellers, issued a catalogue of suffragette jewellery for Christmas 1908.

In 1909 the WSPU presented specially commissioned pieces of jewellery to leading suffragettes Emmeline Pankhurst and Louise Eates. Some Arts and Crafts jewellery of the period incorporated the colours violet, white and green using enamel and semi-precious stones such as amethysts, pearls, and peridots. However jewellery that incorporated these stones was already quite common in women’s jewellery during the late 19th century, before 1903 and could not be connected with the suffragettes, before the WSPU adopted the colours. Also, the notion that the colours were green, white, and violet, to spell GWV as an acronym for “Give Women Votes” is a modern fallacy.[51]

The colours of green and heliotrope (purple) were commissioned into a new coat of arms for Edge Hill University in 2006, symbolising the University’s early commitment to the equality of women through its beginnings as a women-only college.[52]

Popular culture[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Great Britain[edit]



See also[edit]


  1. Jump up ^ Ida Husted Harper. History of Woman Suffrage, volume 6 (National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1922) p. 752.
  2. Jump up ^ “”. Archived from the original on 3 December 2010. Retrieved 8 January 2011. 
  3. Jump up ^ Crawford 1999.
  4. Jump up ^ van Wingerden 1999, p. 9.
  5. Jump up ^ Crawford 1999, p. 452.
  6. Jump up ^ Colmore, Gertrude. Suffragette Sally. Broadview Press, 2007, p. 14
  7. Jump up ^ Ben Walsh. GCSE Modern World History second edition (Hodder Murray, 2008) p. 60.
  8. Jump up ^ Grant 2011.
  9. Jump up ^ Howell, Georgina (2010). Gertrude Bell: Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations. p. 71. 
  10. Jump up ^ Harrison 2013, p. 176.
  11. Jump up ^ Pedersen 2004, p. 124.
  12. Jump up ^ Bolt 1993, p. 191.
  13. Jump up ^ “Did the Suffragettes Help?”. Claire. John D. (2002/2010), Greenfield History Site. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  14. Jump up ^ “The Suffragettes: Deeds not words” (PDF). National Archives. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  15. Jump up ^ Collection Highlights, Pank-A-Squith Board Game, People’s History Museum 
  16. Jump up ^ Time Stokes (21 December 2017). “The strangest things sent in the post”. BBC news. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  17. Jump up ^ “SUFFRAGETTES”. The Register. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 16 April 1913. p. 7. Retrieved 26 October 2011. 
  18. Jump up ^ “Bomb explosion in Westminster Abbey; Coronation Chair damaged; Suffragette outrage”. The Daily Telegraph. 12 June 1914. p. 11. 
  19. Jump up ^ Thorpe, Vanessa (26 May 2013). “Truth behind the death of suffragette Emily Davison is finally revealed”. The Guardian. Guardian News and Media Limited. 
  20. Jump up ^ “With ‘Sophia,’ A Forgotten Suffragette Is Back In The Headlines”. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  21. Jump up ^ Purvis 1995, p. 103.
  22. ^ Jump up to: a b c d Geddes 2008, p. 81.
  23. Jump up ^ Purvis, June (March–April 1995). “Deeds, not words: The daily lives of militant suffragettes in Edwardian Britain”. Women’s Studies International Forum. ScienceDirect. 18 (2): 97. doi:10.1016/0277-5395(95)80046-R. 
  24. Jump up ^ Purvis 1995, p. 104.
  25. Jump up ^ Williams 2001, p. 285.
  26. Jump up ^ Williams, Elizabeth (December 2008). “Gags, funnels and tubes: forced feeding of the insane and of suffragettes”. Endeavour. PubMed. 32 (4): 134. doi:10.1016/j.endeavour.2008.09.001. PMID 19019439. 
  27. Jump up ^ Purvis, “”Deeds, Not Words””, 97
  28. ^ Jump up to: a b c Miller 2009, p. 360.
  29. ^ Jump up to: a b c d Miller 2009, p. 361.
  30. ^ Jump up to: a b Geddes 2008, p. 82.
  31. Jump up ^ Geddes 2008, pp. 84–5.
  32. Jump up ^ Geddes 2008, p. 85.
  33. ^ Jump up to: a b Purvis, “Deeds, Not Words”, 97.
  34. Jump up ^ Williams, “Gags, funnels and tubes”, 138.
  35. Jump up ^ Geddes 2008, p. 83.
  36. Jump up ^ Geddes 2008, p. 88.
  37. Jump up ^ Geddes 2008, p. 89.
  38. Jump up ^ Wilson, Gretchen With All Her Might: The Life of Gertrude Harding, Militant Suffragette (Holmes & Meier Publishing, April 1998)
  39. Jump up ^ Ruz, Camila; Magazine, Justin Parkinson BBC News. “‘Suffrajitsu’: How the suffragettes fought back using martial arts”. BBC News. Retrieved 2015-12-09. 
  40. Jump up ^ Williams, “Gags, funnels and tubes”, 139.
  41. Jump up ^ Geddes 2008, p. 92.
  42. Jump up ^ Purvis 1995, p. 123.
  43. Jump up ^ J. Graham Jones, “Lloyd George and the Suffragettes”, National Library of Wales Journal (2003) 33#1 pp. 1–34
  44. Jump up ^ Ian Cawood, David McKinnon-Bell (2001). “The First World War”. p.71. Routledge 2001
  45. ^ Jump up to: a b c Fawcett, Millicent Garrett. The Women’s Victory – and After. p.170. Cambridge University Press
  46. Jump up ^ Peter N. Stearns (2008).In 1979 the first British women prime minister Margaret came> The Oxford encyclopedia of the modern world, Volume 7. p.160. Oxford University Press, 2008
  47. Jump up ^ , Robert Ensor, England: 1870–1914 (1936) pp 398–99
  48. Jump up ^ G.R. Searley, A New England? Peace and War 1886–1918 (2004) pp 456–70. quote p 468
  49. Jump up ^ Bob Whitfield, The Extension of the Franchise, 1832–1931 (2001) p 160
  50. Jump up ^ Crawford 1999, pp. 136–7.
  51. Jump up ^ Hughes, Ivor (March 2009). “Suffragette Jewelry, Or Is It?”. Antiques Journal. Archived from the original on 11 January 2012. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  52. Jump up ^ “Colours, Crest & Mace”. Retrieved 5 October 2014. 
  53. Jump up ^ McPherson, Angela; McPherson, Susan (2011). Mosley’s Old Suffragette – A Biography of Norah Elam. ISBN 978-1-4466-9967-6. Archived from the original on 13 January 2012. 
Bolt, Christine (1993). The Women’s Movements in the United States and Britain from the 1790s to the 1920s. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press. ISBN 978-0-870-23866-6. 
Crawford, Elizabeth (1999). The Women’s Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866–1928. London: UCL Press. ISBN 978-1-841-42031-8. 
Geddes, J. F. (2008). “Culpable Complicity: the medical profession and the forcible feeding of suffragettes, 1909–1914”. Women’s History Review. 17 (1): 79–94. doi:10.1080/09612020701627977.  closed access publication – behind paywall
Grant, Kevin (2011). “British suffragettes and the Russian method of hunger strike”. Comparative Studies in Society and History. 53 (1): 113–143. doi:10.1017/S0010417510000642.  closed access publication – behind paywall
Harrison, Brian (2013) [1978]. Separate Spheres: The Opposition to Women’s Suffrage in Britain. Abingdon: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-62336-0. 
Miller, Ian (2009). “Necessary Torture? Vivisection, Suffragette Force-Feeding, and Responses to Scientific Medicine in Britain c. 1870–1920”. Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. 64 (3): 333–372. doi:10.1093/jhmas/jrp008.  closed access publication – behind paywall
Pedersen, Susan (2004). Eleanor Rathbone and the Politics of Conscience. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-10245-1. 
Purvis, June (1995). “The Prison Experiences of the Suffragettes in Edwardian Britain”. Women’s History Review. 4 (1): 103–133. doi:10.1080/09612029500200073.  open access publication – free to read
Williams, John (2001). “Hunger Strikes: A Prisoner’s Right or a ‘Wicked Folly’?”. Howard Journal. 40 (3): 285–296. doi:10.1111/1468-2311.00208.  closed access publication – behind paywall

Further reading[edit]

Atkinson, Diane (1992). The Purple, White and Green: Suffragettes in London, 1906–14. London: Museum of London. ISBN 978-0-904-81853-6. 
Hannam, June (2005). “International Dimensions of Women’s Suffrage: ‘at the crossroads of several interlocking identities'”. Women’s History Review. 14 (3–4): 543–560. doi:10.1080/09612020500200438.  closed access publication – behind paywall
Leneman, Leah (1995). A Guid Cause: The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Scotland (2nd ed.). Edinburgh: Mercat Press. ISBN 978-1-873-64448-5. 
Liddington, Jill; Norris, Jill (2000). One Hand Tied Behind Us: The Rise of the Women’s Suffrage Movement (2nd ed.). London: Rivers Oram Press. ISBN 978-1-854-89110-5. 
Mayhall, Laura E. Nym (2000). “Reclaiming the Political: Women and the Social History of Suffrage in Great Britain, France, and the United States”. Journal of Women’s History. 12 (1): 172–181. doi:10.1353/jowh.2000.0023.  closed access publication – behind paywall
——— (2003). The Militant Suffrage Movement: Citizenship and Resistance in Britain, 1860–1930. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-195-15993-6. 
Purvis, June (2002). Emmeline Pankhurst: A Biography. London: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-23978-3. 
Purvis, June; Sandra, Stanley Holton, eds. (2000). Votes For Women. London: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-21458-2. 
Rosen, Andrew (2013) [1974]. Rise Up Women!: The Militant Campaign of the Women’s Social and Political Union, 1903–1914 (Reprint ed.). Abingdon: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-62384-1. 
Smith, Harold L. (2010). The British Women’s Suffrage Campaign, 1866–1928 (Revised 2nd ed.). Abingdon: Routledge. ISBN 978-1-408-22823-4. 
Wingerden, Sophia A. van (1999). The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Britain, 1866–1928. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-333-66911-2. 

Primary sources[edit]

  • Estelle Sylvia Pankhurst. The suffragette; the history of the women’s militant suffrage movement, 1905–1910 (New York Sturgis & Walton Company, 1911).

External links[edit]

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26 Jan 2018 Aurora’s Flight (Drawing and Poem) and Earthquakes

26 Jan 2018 – The title I gave to this one is Aurora’s Flight. Inspiration for the poem. It’s overcast today so sorry it doesn’t translate very well.

Aurora’s Flight by Jackie

I have no flesh only lighted coil

I flow with the winds

My essence barely graces the soil

I chase bands of colored light twisting round crystal towers

There is no time here

No seconds, minutes or hours

The sun to power my range of motion

As I cascade beyond perception

Over the ocean……..


26 Jan 2018 – I’m calling this Planetary Distress and imagining someone(s) from another dimension  answering the call.  Science fiction I know, but that’s what imagination is for!  There are no “rules” or obstructions there.  This comes from my concern about all the recent earthquakes and volcanic activity going on around the world. – shows US but these are occurring all over the world with  more frequency and intensity. –  hopefully the sky will be clear for this  rare event

Jan. 18, 2018
‘Super Blue Blood Moon’ Coming Jan. 31

Hope you all have a lovely day – loved and loving. 

Sometimes our worst enemy is the person reflected in the mirror. One of the hardest things I’ve ever done is to look at myself and tell that person I unconditionally loved them!

5 Jan 2018 Hope rising (chalk drawing) 2006 Poem and missing You tube videos (This video contains content from SME, who has blocked it in your country on copyright grounds)

4 Jan 2018 – A being with a fragment of rainbow inside of them, Hope, trying to rise in a very difficult world.

Hello to you.  It’s 8:40 am as I write to you on this sunny Friday morning.  How are you?  I hope you are well.  I haven’t seen any news this morning so the Hope for having a nice day in me rises unimpeded!

I have about maxed out my picture room on here again, so I’m faced with some decisions.  Either pay for the business account or delete a bunch of stuff.    So if you visit an older post and pictures are missing, you know why.  I’ve noticed recently that a bunch of the videos I’ve shared here from You tube have been disappearing.  One in particular was a Robert Hazard’s music video, Escalator of Life!   The reason that showed up was: “This video contains content from SME, who has blocked it in your country on copyright grounds.”  So if you visit a post and a video is missing, that’s why.  Guess they are starting to “clean house.”

28 June 2006 by Jackie

Before me the road is cleared of trees and any vision of the past

The view out of me is blank and clear

Behind me lies the wreckage twisted and sharp

Painful to touch, painful to feel it brings tears easily to my eyes

Sometimes these new days are so bright I am blinded in my happiness

I find at times I cannot believe what unfolds can be real and true

Can these blessings really be for me in all that I have been?

I spread my arms wide and the rain falls

I lift my head to the heavens and sun shines

I kneel down and the earth trembles

I look around me and the walls fall down

All is laid bare and new; the earth scoured clean the lion roars

From behind the curtain of uncertainty the doors of eternity open

Before me now the shadow passes and light is left in it’s wake

The White Tree shimmers in the dew slipped dawn

There are no leaves just shimmering silver

A new Hope for a new time……..


4 Jan 2018 – chalk drawing and meditation from yesterday morning. I don’t know why I keep thinking someone is trapped underneath the pyramids lol. That’s what this is about to include the stuff on the right. Just my imagination run amok probably.


1 Jan 2018 A glimpse of light and classic reads (The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins 1859)

Hello to you.  It’s 7:06 am on this first day of 2018.  It was quiet last night for a change.  People actually obeyed the city ordinance  of no fireworks in city limits for a change, which we as dog owners and early to bed types appreciated!

This morning when I went to shake out a rug I looked up and there were white twinkling lights I hadn’t seen in a long time!  Stars!  ZOMG!  I went to the back and caught a glimpse of something else lovely I haven’t seen in a long time, a sunrise!  I just went out back to take a peek and there were mauve clouds!  So beautiful!  We’ve had a gray lid on top of us for about two weeks now.  To see the stars, a sunrise….natures lights….what a blessing!

Light in the Gray poem by Jackie Wygant 1 Jan 2018

It has been gray and dreary

The air cold and biting

Far from holiday cheery

But this morning,  in the distance I saw a twinkling white light

A shimmering star against a velvet blue

Twinkling bright

A gift for year that begins anew

Perhaps a glistening sign

Of peace for me….peace for you.


I downloaded several classic stories to my Kindle yesterday to include this one and I’m really enjoying it:

The Woman in White

The Woman in White (novel)

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The Woman in White
The Woman In White - Cover.jpg

Cover of first US edition
Author Wilkie Collins
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre Mystery novel, Sensation novel
Publisher All the Year Round


Publication date
26 November 1859 – 25 August 1860
OCLC 41545143
Preceded by The Dead Secret
Followed by No Name

The Woman in White is Wilkie Collins‘ fifth published novel, written in 1859. It is considered to be among the first mystery novels and is widely regarded as one of the first (and finest) in the genre of “sensation novels“.

The story is sometimes considered an early example of detective fiction with protagonist Walter Hartright employing many of the sleuthing techniques of later private detectives. The use of multiple narrators (including nearly all the principal characters) draws on Collins’s legal training,[1][2] and as he points out in his Preamble: “the story here presented will be told by more than one pen, as the story of an offence against the laws is told in Court by more than one witness”. In 2003, Robert McCrum writing for The Observer listed The Woman in White number 23 in “the top 100 greatest novels of all time”,[3] and the novel was listed at number 77 on the BBC‘s survey The Big Read.[4]


  • Walter Hartright – A young teacher of drawing, something of an everyman character, and distinguished by a strong sense of justice.
  • Frederick Fairlie – A wealthy hypochondriac land-owner: the uncle of Laura Fairlie, distinguished principally by his mock-politeness toward all other characters.
  • Laura Fairlie – Mr. Fairlie’s gentle, guileless, pretty niece: an heiress and orphan.
  • Marian Halcombe – Laura’s elder half-sister and companion; not attractive but intelligent and resourceful. She is described as one “of the finest creations in all Victorian fiction” by John Sutherland.[5]
  • Anne Catherick (“The Woman in White”) – An eccentric young woman distinguished by her insistence on white clothes; an illegitimate daughter of Laura’s father.
  • Jane Catherick – Anne’s unsympathetic mother; in league with Sir Percival Glyde in committing her daughter to the asylum. Depicted as an unpleasant character.
  • Vincent Gilmore – Lawyer to the Fairlies and close friend.
  • Sir Percival Glyde, Baronet – Laura’s fiancé and then husband; able to appear charming and gracious when he wishes but often abrasive.
  • Count Fosco – Sir Percival’s closest friend; his full name is Isidor Ottavio Baldassare Fosco. A grossly obese Italian with a mysterious past: eccentric, bombastic, urbane but intelligent and menacing. He keeps canaries and mice as pets. The Count greatly admires Marian for her intellect, so much so that he is willing to compromise several weak points in his plan (such as allowing Marian to retrieve Laura from the asylum) for her sake.
  • Countess Fosco – Laura’s aunt: once a giddy girl but now humourless and in near-unbroken obedience to her husband.
  • Professor Pesca – A teacher of Italian and good friend of Walter. The professor finds Walter the Limmeridge job, introducing him to Laura and Marian and proves to be Fosco’s unexpected nemesis.


Walter Hartright, a young art teacher, encounters and gives directions to a mysterious and distressed woman dressed entirely in white, lost in London; he is later informed by policemen that she has escaped from an asylum. Soon afterward, he travels to Limmeridge House in Cumberland, having been hired as a drawing master on the recommendation of his friend, Pesca, an Italian language master. The Limmeridge household comprises the invalid Frederick Fairlie, and Walter’s students: Laura Fairlie, Mr. Fairlie’s niece, and Marian Halcombe, her devoted half-sister. Walter realizes that Laura bears an astonishing resemblance to the woman in white, who is known to the household by the name of Anne Catherick: a mentally disabled child who formerly lived near Limmeridge, and was devoted to Laura’s mother, who first dressed her in white.

Over the next few months, Walter and Laura fall in love, despite Laura’s betrothal to Sir Percival Glyde, Baronet. Upon realizing this, Marian advises Walter to leave Limmeridge. Laura receives an anonymous letter warning her against marrying Glyde. Walter deduces that Anne has sent the letter and encounters her again in Cumberland; he becomes convinced that Glyde originally placed Anne in the asylum. Despite the misgivings of the family lawyer over the financial terms of the marriage settlement, which will give the entirety of Laura’s fortune to Glyde if she dies without leaving an heir, and Laura’s confession that she loves another man, Laura and Glyde marry in December 1849 and travel to Italy for six months. Concurrently, Walter joins an expedition to Honduras.

After six months, Sir Percival and Lady Glyde return to his house, Blackwater Park in Hampshire; accompanied by Glyde’s friend, Count Fosco (married to Laura’s aunt). Marian, at Laura’s request, resides at Blackwater and learns that Glyde is in financial difficulties. Glyde attempts to bully Laura into signing a document that would allow him to use her marriage settlement of £20,000, which Laura refuses. Anne, who is now terminally ill, travels to Blackwater Park and contacts Laura, saying that she holds a secret that will ruin Glyde’s life. Before she can disclose the secret, Glyde discovers their communication and becomes extremely paranoid, believing Laura knows his secret and attempts to keep her held at Blackwater. With the problem of Laura’s refusal to give away her fortune and Anne’s knowledge of his secret, Fosco conspires to use the resemblance between Laura and Anne to exchange their two identities. The two will trick both individuals into traveling with them to London; Laura will be placed in an asylum under the identity of Anne, and Anne will be buried under the identity of Laura upon her imminent death. Marian overhears part of this plan but becomes soaked by rain, and contracts typhus.

While Marian is ill, Laura is tricked into traveling to London, and the plan is accomplished. Anne Catherick succumbs to her illness and is buried as Laura, while Laura is drugged and conveyed to the asylum as Anne. When Marian visits the asylum, hoping to learn something from Anne, she finds Laura, who is dismissed as a deluded Anne when she claims to be Laura. Marian bribes the nurse, and Laura escapes. Walter has meanwhile returned from Honduras, and the three live incognito in London, formulating plans to restore Laura’s identity. During his research, Walter discovers Glyde’s secret; he was illegitimate, and therefore not entitled to inherit his title or property. In the belief that Walter has discovered or will discover his secret, Glyde attempts to incinerate the incriminating documents; but perishes in the flames. From Anne’s mother (Jane Catherick), Walter discovers that Anne never knew what Glyde’s secret was. She had only known that there was a secret around Glyde and had repeated words her mother had said in anger to threaten Glyde and then later got the idea into her head that she knew the secret. The reason that Glyde’s parents never got married was that his mother was already married to an Irish man, who left her. While he had no problem claiming the estate, he needed a marriage certificate between his parents to borrow money. So he went to a church in a village, where his parents had lived together and where the pastor, that had service there had died a long ago, and added a fake marriage into their church register. Mrs. Catherick had helped him getting access to the register and was awarded a golden watch with chain and an annual payment.

With the death of Glyde, the trio is safe from persecution, but still, have no way of proving Laura’s true identity. Walter suspects that Anne died before Laura’s trip to London, and proof of this would prove their story, but only Fosco holds knowledge of the dates. Walter figures out from a letter he got from Mrs. Catherick’s former employer, that Anne was the illegitimate child of Laura’s father. On a visit to the Opera with Pesca, he learns that Fosco has betrayed an Italian nationalist society, of which Pesca is a high-ranking member. When Fosco prepares to flee the country, Walter forces a written confession from him, by which Laura’s identity is legally restored, in exchange for a safe-conduct from England. Laura’s identity is restored and the inscription on her gravestone replaced by that of Anne Catherick. Fosco escapes, only to be killed by another agent of the society. To ensure the legitimacy of his efforts on her part, Walter and Laura have married earlier; and on the death of Frederick Fairlie, their son inherits Limmeridge.

Themes and influences[edit]

The theme of the story is the unequal position of married women in law at the time. Laura Glyde’s interests have been neglected by her uncle and her fortune of £20,000 (then an enormous sum of money) by default falls to her husband on her death. This provides the motive for the conspiracy of her unscrupulous husband and his co-conspirator Fosco. In his later Man and Wife, Collins portrays another victim of the law’s partiality, who takes a terrible revenge on her husband.


The novel was first published in serial form in 1859–60, appearing in Charles Dickens‘ magazine All the Year Round (UK) and Harper’s Weekly (USA). It was published in book form in 1860.[6]

Critical reception[edit]

The novel was extremely successful commercially, but contemporary critics were generally hostile.[6] Modern critics and readers regard it as Collins’ best novel:[6] a view with which Collins concurred, as it is the only one of his novels named in his chosen epitaph: “Author of The Woman in White and other works of fiction”.[7]



Film and television[edit]


Computer games[edit]

  • “Victorian Mysteries: Woman in White” created by FreezeTag Games (2010)


  1. Jump up ^ Wilkie Collins (26 November 1887). “How I Write my Books”. The Globe. 
  2. Jump up ^ “Mr Wilkie Collins in Gloucester Place”. Number 81 in ‘Celebrities at Home’, The World. 26 December 1877. 
  3. Jump up ^ McCrum, Robert (12 October 2003). “100 greatest novels of all time”. London: Guardian. Retrieved 27 October 2012. 
  4. Jump up ^ “BBC – The Big Read”. BBC. April 2003, Retrieved 18 October 2012
  5. Jump up ^ The Woman in White, notes by John Sutherland, ISBN 0-19-283429-0
  6. ^ Jump up to: a b c Symons, Julian (1974). Introduction to “The Woman in White”,. Penguin. 
  7. Jump up ^ Peters, Catherine (1993). The King of Inventors. Princeton University Press. 
  8. Jump up ^ “The Woman in White”. Samuel French Ltd. Retrieved 2 October 2012.

The Woman in White – Original Theatrical Trailer


28 Dec 2017 Timelessness (drawing and poem) and Maksim/Royal Philharmonic Orchestra/Julian Kershaw-Somewhere in Time/The Old Woman (from Somewhere in Time)”

Timelessness by Jackie Wygant

Woven thread of blood, flesh and light

Through the particles of creation

You shine bright.

A flicker, a flash, a leaf on the wind

Where you end

I begin.

Here there is no marking a passage, just flowing through

This space to that space

Is how I always find you.


Maksim – Somewhere in Time (one of my favorite movies that I can’t watch often – just wrecks me lol!)


24 Dec 2017 Drawings, Holiday songs (David Bowie and Elvis Presley) and Hope Is A Thing With Feathers (poem by Emily Dickinson)

Hello to you.  I hope this finds you well wherever and whenever you are.   Not much to write to you about.  If you celebrate the holidays, I hope everything goes as you have hoped and planned.  Perhaps even grown an extra gray hair or two to make happen lol!   Thank you for stopping by!  I give you big hugs, love and all the very best the world can give to you through the wires! read about the origin of this holiday

Bing Crosby & David Bowie – “The Little Drummer Boy (Peace On Earth)”

Elvis Presley – – Blue Christmas – – – 1968 – – {Live} – (the year I got here lol)

Hope Is The Thing With Feathers – Poem by Emily Dickinson

‘Hope’ is the thing with feathers—
That perches in the soul—
And sings the tune without the words—
And never stops—at all—

And sweetest—in the Gale—is heard—
And sore must be the storm—
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm—

I’ve heard it in the chillest land—
And on the strangest Sea—
Yet, never, in Extremity,
It asked a crumb—of Me.


17 Nov 2017 Lead back to old poetry via my dreams (Peterson AFB CO)

Hello to you. It’s Friday morning, 7:40 am as I begin to write to you. I hope this finds you well.

The snippet of a dream I remember from last night/this morning lead me back in my waking world to Peterson AFB CO. I was stationed there for nearly seven years between Falcon AFB (now Schriever), HQ Air Force Space Command and Peterson. We were at Peterson when 9/11 happened.

What I remember of the dream is disjointed. There was something about seeing a folder that had the words, “Cooking in Heaven” on the cover. I remember meeting a Capt Carlton (I knew him as a General, the commander of the 36 Fighter Wing) and there was something about leading and being lead (this is something I’ve been thinking about a lot lately with regards to what is going on in our country – there is a lot of being lead by people that were hired to lead! We have a system that doesn’t make it easy for those who even try to be leaders!)  In the dream I was an officer, a Lieutenant. I can remember saluting and being saluted. There was something about food before marching.  A meal had been prepared but the soldiers were going to go marching before eating the meal and they were called back for the meal (makes me think of how Basic Training at Lackland AFB was lol!)

I was lead to a couple of poems I wrote during those days, one of which that was actually published. I thought I had bought the book it was printed in, but I don’t have it anymore! Glad I kept the paperwork for it. The theme of these poems is transition….moving. A very prevalent theme when you are a member of the military no matter what branch you are in.

In talking to other veterans, to include Kyle’s family, we still get the “itch” to move that comes after you have lived somewhere a long time.  Then the “FIGMO” would happen (Finally I Got My Order or Fuck it, Got My Orders), getting order to move.  After you separate or retire….your on your own and it gets harder as time goes by. You don’t have people to come and pack you up anymore and the knowledge you have a secure job waiting for you at the next location. As much as I hate to admit it, when I served in the Air Force, there was a job security that is nearly non-existent in most any job sector in America today.

Kind of a shitty deal though. Finding job security by feeding the war machine. I have to temper that statement though.  When I was looking through the pictures and papers I have in binders this morning, to include the silly Photoshop picture of Air Force Space Command with a UFO flying over it, I am reminded of a much kinder and gentler military than I hear exists now.  We used to temper the stress of our jobs with fun…comraderie…friendship….we were family for each other.  Pretty much for the whole time I served, I was encouraged to share my gifts of writing and art.  I did little newspapers with cartoons, did drawings and wrote poems for people’s special occasions like retirements, separations, promotions, and permanent change of stations.  I remember the people who I served with both military and many civilians that made my 16 years even remotely bearable. I miss those people, not the jobs I did for the “machine.”

Anyhew….the poems

Changing Scenery Again – by Jackie Wygant (then Cammarato) National Library of Poetry, Beneath the Harvest Moon 1996

Once again we’ve found a place

But as soon as we feel settled

Order in hand, it’s time again to roam.

The boxes will come

Many good-bye will be said

A part of us will awaken

That which we thought was dead

All the treasures we bought with such care

Will soon be tossed and crushed

Loaded into a moving truck

Our apartment then empty and hushed

Soon too will come a parade of new faces

The dance of new friendships will begin

The longing to stay in our comfort

We’ll face with our usual chegrin

The scenery keeps on changing

Faces and places blending with the years

Someday we’ll be home

And when we do, be listening for the cheers!!

Jackie Wygant – it was Cammarato then) – I wrote this on 7 Aug 1998 for a decoration presentation not sure but think it may have been mine.

I wrote this around the time I left working at Air Force Space Command. I hated working there….nothing but a sea of gray cubicles and stress. My jobs there were very high visibility and stressful like arranging award ceremonies for the command and managing the records and promotion procedures for all the officers assigned to the command.

I did love the people I worked with and miss so many of them and wonder how they are to do this day. I think often of General Estes, who was the Commander of Air Force Space Command when I was there. He was not the conventional “CEO.” I would often see him riding his bike as I was running on base. I will always remember standing in line at the Base Exchange and he was in front of my ex and I. What was he buying? White socks lol. I think I remember that because it’s important to remember now matter how high you live or how low in so many ways, the ways that matter in this life, we are all the same from cradle to grave and back again.

It’s important to remember that when you get to the “high places” not to forget how you got there!

Angel on my shoulder it’s time to fly

Find another way to live

Though we are afraid, we mustn’t cry

For a lighted narrow door opens now in this wood

If we go through it

It will forever do us good

The doorways light casts away the shadows and dark

Inside of our minds and hearts

It lights a spark

Opportunity is provided, though not treasures and gold

It still sparkles like sunlit dewdrops before us

Providing us a future before our flesh grows cold

Angel on my shoulders open your wings

It’s time for us to be off

To new and finer things…..

*Happy birthday wishes to my friends Margie and Ken today wherever and whenever you are.



15 Nov 2017 Great Grandma Huff (Come Little Leaves poem by George Cooper), Stranger Things 2, dreams and Could Your Brain Be Hacked (AsapSCIENCE YouTube)

*19 Nov 2017 edit*  I was reading the book of poems I bought (Favorite Poems Old and New Selected by Helen Ferris, page 541) tonight with Kyle and came across the poem in the picture!  Turns out my Grandma Huff didn’t write it after all.  The author’s name is George Cooper!  My Grandma Becker apparently loved this poem and knew it by heart.  She must have translated it and just forgot to add the author’s name.

Hello to you.  It’s Wednesday morning, 7:22 am, as I begin to write to you.  Can you believe the month is already half over?!!  Somebody must have pushed the fast forward button or something lol!  People are asking questions about Christmas gifts and all that and I’m just not ready for it!  I’m pretty much just get me a gift card if you feel you must buy me something or donate to a charity in my name anymore.  I just don’t want anymore “stuff” unless it’s functional and or has a purpose.  Kyle’s parents asked what we wanted for Christmas and at first he didn’t have an answer and then remembered we had wanted to buy a small confection oven to replace our long dead microwave.  We are getting to that time in our lives where we just don’t want anymore crap to dust lool!

Yesterday I got a present via a text from my Aunt Ruthie.  She shared a poem with a picture of  my Great Grandma Huff about fall.  This beautiful poem is written in my Grandma Carol’s handwriting and had been hanging in my Uncle Walt’s office, her brother, until he died a couple of years ago.

14 Nov 2017 Poem with picture of by my Great Grandma Huff that was in my Grandma Beckers handwriting hanging in her brother Walts office now with Aunt Ruth Elliott

Come little leaves,” said
the wind one day.
“Come over the meadow
with me and play.
Put on your dresses of
red and gold,
The summer’s gone and the days go cold.”
As soon as the leaves heard
the wind’s loud call,
down they came tumbling
one and all.
Over the brown fields they
danced and flew
singing the soft little songs
they knew.
“Cricket, goodbye!” We’ve been
friends so long –
Little brook, sing us your
farewell song.
Say you are sorry to see us go.
Ah, you will miss us
quite well we know.”

The poem makes a little ache in my chest when I read it.  The way I interpret it is that we are like the leaves and when the wind makes it’s loud call, God, we fly away home and we are missed.  So many of my elder’s, my ancestors, my Ancient One’s have done as the leaves and have answered the wind’s call.  I miss them almost every day but keep them alive in heart and how I live my daily life.  There are very much alive in me.

Kyle and I binge watched some Stranger Things 2 yesterday.  It started out slow and now is just really picking up at Episode 4.  I feel like a lot of my drawings to even include the wisp people I was drawing have been leading up to me watching this darn show lol!  I’ve mentioned this before that sometimes my art seems to be like a tv guide lol.  Not very specific or very useful it feels like.  Kind of like what it’s like talking to someone in another room.  Unless you go to the person where they are speaking from,  all you get is just get bits and pieces but nothing specific enough to be really useful.  Anyhew…the show is so good!  I think because it’s set in the 1980’s, my teenage years, it really is hitting my nostalgia buttons!

I’ve really started to wonder lately if it is possible for human beings to be “hacked” by the unseen (be it stuff like Wifi signals, unseen bugs, vapors or the paranormal – God is energy and everything is energy so….even being hacked by “God?” Are we always driving the “car” that is our body?) and this show is certainly exploring that with the character Will who I really resonate with.  Watching him frantically drawing pictures of what he was experiencing in his mind really resonated with me and what I do outside with my chalk drawings sometimes.  I told Kyle last night, from my own experiences, I believe there is a world we all can see, one we can’t and the one we are told exists.

Stranger Things 2 | Final Trailer [HD] | Netflix

My dream factory didn’t generate the sort of dreams I had expected after binge watching such a show!  I guess that “production” is still in the works lol.

Instead I dreamt about shopping for clothes – fashion!  There was something about the wearing of a bandana on the head with a hat (this is from my character in FFXIV, Aurora, getting a new hat that has a bandana underneath) for Good Friday.  There was a woman dressed in a long tan colored felt or velvet dress.  She had black hair that was in a big bun on the top of her head and she looked like Eva Green (me thinking about Reeve Carney and Vanessa Ives yesterday I guess) and she was spinning in front of someone impossibly fast without getting dizzy.  Then she suddenly stopped, worrying and asking, “Did I damage the dress?” as she examined the bottom hem of the dress that had touched the floor while she was spinning.

13 Nov 2017 – My FFXIV character Aurora in new gear to include hat with bandana under it.


Love this

The other dream was triggered by the scene in Stranger Things 2 where Winona’s character Joyce Byers (Byers is the last name of a guy I had a crush on during Senior High School that looked like David Bowie lol), is trying to figure out how to watch a VHS-C tape in a regular VHS player.  I remember having that problem – we had an adaptor to make it so you could watch the smaller sized tape in a regular VHS machine.  My dream was about my ex asking me if I liked the adult movie he had picked out lol.  Ugh.  Way to go dream factory, way to go.

Anyhew…time to get started with the day.  I hope this finds you well.  Send some sunshiney wishes this way….gray and overcast again!

Could Your Brain Be Hacked?

AsapScience, stylized as AsapSCIENCE, is a YouTube channel created by Canadian YouTubers Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown. The channel produces weekly videos that touch on many different topics of science.[1]

The two creators have a secondary channel, AsapTHOUGHT (recently renamed Greg and Mitch) which contains videos discussing several issues (not all pertaining to science).



8 Nov 2017 Intertwined (poem and drawing)

Hello to you.  It’s 2:25 pm on this rainy afternoon.  Kyle got a call earlier today asking if we might keep his youngest brother company for a couple days while his Dad has some unexpected surgery.  So our house will expand to receive his brother Cole, Henry and Suzie their dogs and we will keep Dad in our prayers for a swift recovery!  God is in charge.

Today’s message for me and anyone else it might resonate with:  “Serenity comes when you trade expectations for acceptance – Unknown”


8 Nov 2017 – Drawing to explore how we are intertwined…the light and shadows that are the me, myself and I.

Intertwined – Jackie Wygant 8 Nov 2017

Is it me or is it you?

Is there one of us

Or are there two?

In the storms and rain is you who stands tall

Or is it me who spreads my arms

While you are small?

We are threads from the same piece of thread


Until we are dead.

* a positive PS

John Cornyn writes bill to improve gun background checks after Texas church shooting

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, introduced a bill Tuesday to “incentivize” federal agencies to report criminal convictions to ensure the wrong people cannot purchase guns.

Cornyn’s bill comes in response to the deadly church shooting that left 26 dead in Texas. The shooter, Devin Patrick Kelley, was able to purchase a gun despite a 2014 domestic assault conviction. The Air Force said they erroneously failed to report the conviction.

“This critically important information from the suspect’s criminal history was not uploaded into the relevant background check databases, even though a federal law clearly requires that it be done,” Cornyn said.

Cornyn said Congress can take actions to make federal agencies properly report convictions and the number of records actually reported to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System is “staggeringly low.”

Cornyn said the reporting problems must be rectified.

“Because there was no record of it, he was able to lie his way into getting these firearms,” Cornyn said. “This is very clearly a problem, and the Air Force has now admitted that Kelley’s conviction should have barred him from ever purchasing or possessing firearms.”


29 Oct 2017 The Hotel of hunger, Wizard and the Dragon (Dreams) and Mother Earth (Poem by Henry Van Dyke)

Hello to you in your here and now. It’s a very chilly Sunday morning as I write to you. I hope this finds you well.

I don’t know if it’s because we finally got enough animal protein yesterday, it’s cooler at night for sleeping or just that Kyle was home and I felt safer but the dream factory was quite active.

The first dream I remember was something about a hotel and a hungry child, a little boy. This little boy had been relying on the now closed hotel for food, as had many others. It was being repurposed to another sort of living space. There was someone showing me the property and there was a screened in porch that magically expanded before my eyes. When we got to the kitchen the little boy was there. I told him I hoped some day he would have a good job and make lots of money so he wouldn’t be hungry anymore. The food left behind by the previous owners of the property was rotting. That was all there was to give the child was rotting food to eat.

(After reflecting on this dream, it seemed to almost be a story that is playing out before all of us. Our earth that we have relied on for all of our lives is being repurposed. The screened in porch makes me think of geoengineering, weather modification or spraying the sky to block the sun. The rotting food – well recently there has been a lot of vegetable recalls because of Listeria for example ( We are destroying the earth for which our survival depends and if we aren’t careful, all that is going to be left for our children is rotted food.)

The second dream.

The dream was about a flood and people in the rising waters saw sparkling baby slippers and weren’t sure if they should take them from the unattended shop they were in front of. They took them. There was another shop with parts of a collection of heart jewelry and fairy figurines out front. The shop was attended and the woman collecting together the heart jewelry and fairy figurines was dissuaded from taking these items like the others in the flood. She was invited into the shop because somehow she had summoned a dragon in all this and the wizard in the shop took her to a private room and said, “You have managed to summon a dragon and you are going to show me precisely how you did it.”

(After reflecting on this dream, I know the woman in the dream is me as I have and like heart themed jewelry and have collected fairy and dragon figurines. I perceive the flood as being an analogy for what we are experiencing in our world and the choices different people make when faced with overwhelming odds. Some people choose to have children. Some people choose to loot and plunder….remember the pictures after Katrina? The dragon part has a lot to do with my long interest in Vlad Tepes, dragons and just last night moving further along in the FFXIV Heavensward expansion where the Archbishop Thordan VII reminds me of Anthony Hopkins who was a Dragon of sorts as Hannibal.

If you curious to learn about the FFXIV storyline, here are some links. I think you will find the story of the relationship between the dragons and humans to be all too familiar – the quest for power by whatever means, murder, betrayal and lies to quell the masses and keep them placated…from revolting:

If a man cannot atone for his sins in the course of his all-too-fleeting life, must his progeny then be held to account? Must every subsequent generation be judged as well?

—Archbishop Thordan VII

Do you know what sort of man becomes Lord Commander of the Temple Knights? One who comes from good stock. I did not, yet here I am. Now why do you suppose that is? Because I swiftly learned to tell the difference between words, deeds, and beliefs.


I am vengeance incarnate! I am Nidhogg! Thou shall die by my hand!

—Estinien, Nidhogg’s Shade

Henry Van Dyke

Henry Van Dyke (10 November 1852 – 10 April 1933 / Germantown, Pennsylvania)
poet Henry Van Dyke

Mother Earth – Poem by Henry Van Dyke

Mother of all the high-strung poets and singers departed,
Mother of all the grass that weaves over their graves the glory of the field,
Mother of all the manifold forms of life, deep-bosomed, patient, impassive,
Silent brooder and nurse of lyrical joys and sorrows!
Out of thee, yea, surely out of the fertile depth below thy breast,
Issued in some strange way, thou lying motionless, voiceless,
All these songs of nature, rhythmical, passionate, yearning,
Coming in music from earth, but not unto earth returning.

Dust are the blood-red hearts that beat in time to these measures,
Thou hast taken them back to thyself, secretly, irresistibly
Drawing the crimson currents of life down, down, down
Deep into thy bosom again, as a river is lost in the sand.
But the souls of the singers have entered into the songs that revealed them, –
Passionate songs, immortal songs of joy and grief and love and longing:
Floating from heart to heart of thy children, they echo above thee:
Do they not utter thy heart, the voices of those that love thee?

Long hadst thou lain like a queen transformed by some old enchantment
Into an alien shape, mysterious, beautiful, speechless,
Knowing not who thou wert, till the touch of thy Lord and Lover
Working within thee awakened the man-child to breathe thy secret.
All of thy flowers and birds and forests and flowing waters
Are but enchanted forms to embody the life of the spirit;
Thou thyself, earth-mother, in mountain and meadow and ocean,
Holdest the poem of God, eternal thought and emotion.