4 Sept 2019 Horse Apple Tree – Alvarado TX

2 Sept 2019 Jackie Wygant cell phone picture horse apple tree next to abandoned house near The Family Dollar Alvarado TX

The other day I was walking to the Family Dollar down the street and happened to notice this beautiful tree living near an abandoned house across the street from our local Elementary School.  I got to thinking about how nice it would be if that property could be annexed to the school for learning about plants and nature; like a nature learning center or something.  There is a large field next to it I imagined being turned into a community garden and it could also be part of the learning center.  I imagined children learning how to grow their own food and appreciating nature like I do.

https://lancaster.unl.edu/enviro/pest/nebline/hedgeapple.htm

Facts and Myths of Hedge Apples
by Dr. Barbara Ogg, Extension Educator

This article appeared in the October 2001 NEBLINE Newsletter

This time of year, hedge apples – the fruit from the Osage-orange tree – are being sold at farmer’s markets, garden centers, and other locations. Many people have heard that these fruits can be used as an insect repellent, but the truth is that many people don’t know much else about this unusual tree and its fruit.

The Tree and Its Fruit:

Osage-Orange Tree - Click on Image for Larger ViewThe Osage-orange is a small to medium-sized tree, having a short trunk and a rounded or irregular crown. The twigs are buff to orange-brown and are armed with one-half inch long spines. The stems exude a milky sap when cut. The Osage-orange is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are produced on separate trees. The small, green flowers appear in May or June. Female trees produce 3-to 5-inch diameter fruit which ripen in September or October and fall to the ground.

Native Habitat and Current Distribution:

The Osage-orange is native to a small area in eastern Texas, southeastern Oklahoma, and southwestern Arkansas. This region is the home of the Osage Indians which gives the tree its common name. Settlers found that the Osage-orange transplanted easily, tolerated poor soils, extreme heat, and strong winds and had no serious insect or disease problems. It was widely planted in the Midwest as a living fence because, when pruned into a hedge, it provided an impenetrable barrier to livestock. The development of barbed wire curtailed its widespread planting, but many Osage-orange trees can still be found in fence rows.

Osage-orange fence post - Click on Image for Larger viewUses of the Osage-Orange:

The wood is extremely hard, heavy, durable and shrinks or swells little compared to the wood of other trees. The wood is used for fence posts, treenails, furniture, and archery bows. In fact, many archers consider the wood of the Osage-orange to be the world’s finest wood for bows. Another common name for this tree, bodark, is from the French bios d’arc meaning “bow wood.” This tree also produces a bright yellow dye which can be extracted from the wood.

The fruit of the Osage-orange is a nuisance in the home landscape and has little value. Hedge apples are not an important source of food for wildlife as most birds and animals find the fruit unpalatable. The thorny trees do provide nesting and cover for wildlife.

The belief about the use of hedge apples for insect control is widespread and persistent. it is claimed that placing hedge apples around the foundation or inside the basement will repel or control insects. A few years ago, Iowa State University toxicologists extracted compounds from hedge apples. When concentrated, these compounds were found to repel insects.

Scientists also found that natural concentrations of these compounds in the fruit were too low to be an effective repellent. So, don’t be fooled into spending much to use hedge apples as an insect repellent.

If you decide to pick hedge apples to check out the repellency yourself or to use the fruit as a fall decoration, it would be wise to wear gloves. The milky juice present in the stems and fruit of the Osage-orange can irritate the skin.

Insects, Spiders, Mice and MoreReturn for more information on Insects, Spiders, Mice and More

Looking for information about a specific insect pest or your local wildlife? Visit here.


USE OF THE EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS: You may reproduce the Educational Resource Guides for educational purposes but not for sales purposes (unless otherwise indicated as a sales item–these items may not be reproduced). Videotapes are copyrighted and may not be reproduced. If you have questions about using any photographs or images, visit Credits for use. You’re also welcome to link to “Insects, Spiders, Mice and More” from your website. Please credit: University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension in Lancaster County (http://lancaster.unl.edu/enviro/pest/bug.htm)

https://www.ridingthebeast.com/ – site I use to look at words and phrases.  It helps me learn in a different way.

horse apple tree” in the English Ordinal system equals 163

(empath – 63)

hedge apples” in the English Ordinal system equals 98

(together – 98)

Osage-Orange tree” in the English Ordinal system equals 155

(shared – 55)

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18 Feb 2019 Flowers

flowers in Simple Gematria equals: 98

17/8/4/2/1 or 17 divided by 2 = 8.5 = 13/4/2/1 or 13 divided by 2 = 6.5 = 11/2/1 or 11 divided by 2 = 5.5 = 10/1 or 10 divided by 2 = 5 divided by 2 =

2.5 = 7 divided by 2 = 3.5= 8 divided by 2 = 4 divided by 2 = 2 divided by 2 comes back to 1

For some there is no question that they like flowers.  For some there is a question which flowers they like.  For some they like flowers but are allergic to them so they cannot enjoy flowers except from a great distance.  For some they know for certain they do not like flowers and avoid them at all cost.  For some it is not enough to dislike flowers.  They will go out of their way to destroy flowers for others so that no one may enjoy them.

What happens with the like or dislike of flowers could also cross over to people and anything else with a spirit, anything or anyone that comes from the God of my understanding.

A further look at how the sum for the flower breaks down:

nine eight in Simple Gematria equals: 91

nine one in Simple Gematria equals: 76

seven six in Simple Gematria equals: 117

one one seven in Simple Gematria equals: 133

one three three in Simple Gematria equals: 146

one four six in Simple Gematria equals: 146

(rose = 57/12/3 cycle)

DSC_0569 27 April 2018 rose in the morning sun Alvarado TX

Fluttershy’s Coronation Dress by Bethiebo on deviantART – I don’t have permission to use this image so I won’t.  For those unfamiliar, My Little Pony has a character named Fluttershy and she is one of my favorites.  When I was in a very dark depression it was at first the original MLP and then the current show that helped lift me out.  The show was like a life preserver from God to me and I’m very grateful for it.  The show is positive and tries to teach life lessons in a way many levels, many ages of people, can comprehend in a loving way.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lauren_Faust – never knew what she looked like until today.  She looks a lot like my husbands avatar for Monster Hunter Lol!  Thank you for your work Lauren and all those who work with you to try and make the entertainment world a better place for people like me.