23 June 2018 Music Makes Time Travelers Of Us All (James Corden and Paul McCartney), Sewing and Drawings

Hello to you.  How are you doing in your where and when as you visit here?  I hope you are well.  We are still drying our happy tears and glowing a bit from watching this video of James Corden and Paul McCartney carpooling down memory lane in song:

Paul McCartney Carpool Karaoke

Published on Jun 21, 2018

James Corden heads to Liverpool for a special day with Paul McCartney spent exploring the city of Paul’s youth, visiting his childhood home where he wrote music with John Lennon, performing songs in a local pub and of course driving around singing a few of Paul’s biggest hits. Pre-order Paul McCartney’s new album Egypt Station and download his two new songs “Come On To Me” and “I Don’t Know” here: https://paulmccartney.lnk.to/EgyptSta… – Watch The Late Late Show with James Corden’s episodes from London only on Sky One at 10pm.

Just like looking at a photograph, singing and or hearing a song can propel us through our time on this earth.  Music makes time travelers of all of us.  Watching this made my heart ache a bit because there aren’t very many like Paul left here.  Watching this also made me incredibly grateful we have songs of love, hope and unity to turn to and some of the folks who made them yet here to sing them with us!   Thank you for doing this James and Paul!

https://musicandmemory.org/ – great organization that uses music to help people regain some of what Alzheimer’s and dementia makes them lose.

I thought it was beautiful that the inspiration for this song came from Paul’s having a visit from his deceased mother in a dream.

22 June 2018 – drawing I did when it had finally cooled down last night!

Let It Be

When I find myself in times of trouble
Mother Mary comes to me
Speaking words of wisdom, let it be.
And in my hour of darkness she is standing right in front of me
Speaking words of wisdom, let it be.
Let it be, let it be, let it be, let it be,
Whisper words of wisdom, let it be.

And when the broken hearted people
Living in the world agree
There will be an answer, let it be.
For though they may be parted there is still a chance that they will see
There will be an answer, let it be.
Let it be, let it be, let it be, let it be,
There will be an answer, let it be.

And when the night is cloudy
There is still a light that shines on me
Shine until tomorrow, let it be.
I wake up to the sound of music
Mother Mary comes to me
Speaking words of wisdom, let it be.
Let it be, let it be, let it be, let it be,
There will be an answer, let it be.

Songwriters: JOHN LENNON,PAUL MCCARTNEY
© Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
For non-commercial use only.
Data from: LyricFind
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22 June 2018 Drawings and Dream (Shadow in the barn)

Hello to you.  Hope this finds you well in mind, body and spirit.  We are doing pretty well.  I didn’t have a very restful sleep last night, lots of tossing and turning.  Doesn’t help the mosquitos have been using me as a pin cushion again lol!

I did dream though and it was quite involved.  The only part I took to the waking world was this.  There was a woman walked into a barn and there was a black cloud or shadow entity in there.  It moved towards her making that scary chattering weird “voice” sound and startled me awake.  It was refreshing that for a change this sort of thing wasn’t “after me” directly but I was fearful for the woman!  I hope there was nothing to it.  I’ve been attacked by a such a shadow before when we lived in Delaware and it was terrifying.  The next day after it happened they pulled a body out of a neighbors yard from across the street.  We were very freaked out about that!

(The chimney shadow looks a bit like what I saw in my dream only it was more like a cloud of jet black curling smoke that was intelligent)

20 June 2018 – Our chimney casting a people shadow.

(The reason I do the dividing by 2 is the splitting between our light and shadow self – this is usually required for words that require analysis, examination and the infusion of perception both biological and spiritual).

19 8 1 4 15 23

S H A D O W  = 70/7 divided by 2 = 3.5 = 8/4/2/1 – deciding if a shadow is a positive or a negative thing involves perception of both our eyes and both sides of ourselves

15 21 9 10 1

O U  I  J A = 56/11/2/1

16 1 18 1 14 15 18 13 1 12

P A R A N O R M A L = 109/10/1

4 18 5 1 13

D R E A M = 41/5 divided by 2 = 2.5 = 7 divided by 2 = 3.5 = 8/4/2/1 – dreams almost always are up for analysis, perception and examination.

19 20 18 5 19 19 5 4

S T R E S S E D (DESSERTS) = 109/10/1  (I’m tickled a bit here, you have to admit being stressed and eating some desserts fringes on a paranormal experience!)

This poem by my Mom is an example of a positive perception of a shadow.

The Shadow
By (My Mom, Jeannie Faith Becker this poem won her first place in the first Borah High School poetry contest in Boise Idaho, she was in her Senior Year)

Through the field of clover fair
Moved a shadow, swept by air

It sank upon the earth so warm –
All nature loved this slender form.

Of clover plucked from this fair land
It wove a wreath, its hair to band.

The shadow raised its head to see
Blue flashing birds fly from a tree.

It felt a surge of love for this
Fresh air, soft sky, it was bliss.

The shadow did a dance so gay,
It swirled, it swayed, then died away……

The mind and soul of the young girl
Who sat amongst the class turmoil

Returned to her with sighs of woe.
“It’s stuffy here,” she murmured low.

She frowned, then smiled, without delay,
“At least my mind can soar away

Oh!  I have found the magic key –
Imagination sets you free!”

21 June 2018 Shadows, Drawing, Dream and Building Relationships with People from Different Cultures (Community Toolbox)

Hello to you.  I hope this finds you well wherever and whenever you are.

My mind put together some keys and made a very strange dream for me last night.  In my waking world there was a visit to our door from two girls from Estonia.  They were foreign exchange students trying to sell children’s books and since Link and Spot can’t read, we didn’t buy any books lol.  Thinking about all the immigrant, refugee, racial and other tensions going on in our world.  Then just before bed I was reading from the Chronicles of Narnia about Edmund, Peter, Susan, Lucy and Trumpkin not letting a bear they killed go to waste and stripping it for meat for their travels.

Well the dream was of me meeting Vladimir Putin through a glass door.  He looked at me and mouthed the word, “White.”  In the dream I looked like I did back in the 90’s when I had let me hair grown long and wavy and I was really tan.  I said, “I am white.”  Then there is a scene of me using a hammer to cut raw meat on an anvil to make steaks for us to eat.

Weird right?!  I am still holding out for the day that our world leaders are all sitting together playing a round of Monster Hunter together or some PVP.

People doing yoga together outside on a beautiful day. (Source Internet)

25 15 7 1

Y O G A = 48/12/3 cycle

When people go to work they shouldn’t have to leave their hearts at home.
Betty Bender

It’s so complicated and yet so simple what’s going on in our world today.  For example today is World Yoga Day.  It’s so simple to imagine a bunch of people from all walks of life sitting in a natural setting together.   Focused on their breathing, meditating and in my case probably drifting off for a nap.

It starts to get very complicated when you see what happens after all those same people get up and head out into their own lives.  Kind of like what happens after a church service, a concert, a festival or a family gathering.  What happens to the peace, unity, acceptance, calm, togetherness…..love for each other?  People get behind the wheels of their cars and start honking, making angry faces and tailgating their ways out of the parking lot and on to the busy roads that lead to their daily lives.

My hope for more people is for them to be able to hold on to what they experience and learn when they are sharing space with people of all walks of life beyond the experience and into the day to day world.

Seek first to understand……..

I found this on my digital travels this morning and felt it was really good and wanted to share it with you.  What is discussed here is what I think is missing from a lot of the places that are experiencing so many problems with race, religion and sexual orientation.  A lot of people operate under assumptions, misinformation, stereotypes and just narrow minded programming starting at childhood and it can cause a lot of problems at all levels of existence in our world!  It’s never too late to change and grow!

https://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/culture/cultural-competence/building-relationships/main

Section 2. Building Relationships with People from Different Cultures

  • How do you learn about people’s cultures?

  • How do you build relationships with people from other cultures?

 

Photo of people in a circle with their hands in the middle

 

Relationships are powerful. Our one-to-one connections with each other are the foundation for change. And building relationships with people from different cultures, often many different cultures, is key in building diverse communities that are powerful enough to achieve significant goals.

Whether you want to make sure your children get a good education, bring quality health care into your communities, or promote economic development, there is a good chance you will need to work with people from several different racial, language, ethnic, or economic groups. And in order to work with people from different cultural groups effectively, you will need to build sturdy and caring relationships based on trust, understanding, and shared goals.

Why? Because trusting relationships are the glue that hold people together as they work on a common problem. As people work on challenging problems, they will have to hang in there together when things get hard. They will have to support each other to stay with an effort, even when it feels discouraging. People will have to resist the efforts of those who use divide-and-conquer techniques–pitting one cultural group against another.

Regardless of your racial, ethnic, religious, or socioeconomic group, you will probably need to establish relationships with people whose group you may know very little about.

Each one of us is like a hub of a wheel. Each one of us can build relationships and friendships around ourselves that provide us with the necessary strength to achieve community goals. If each person builds a network of diverse and strong relationships, we can come together and solve problems that we have in common.

In this section, we are going to talk about:

  • Becoming aware of your own culture as a first step in learning about other people’s culture.
  • Building relationships with people from many different cultures.

But first let’s talk about what culture is. Culture is a complex concept, with many different definitions. But, simply put, “culture” refers to a group or community with which we share common experiences that shape the way we understand the world. It includes groups that we are born into, such as gender, race, national origin, class, or religion. It can also include groups we join or become part of. For example, we can acquire a new culture by moving to a new region, by a change in our economic status, or by becoming disabled. When we think of culture this broadly we realize we all belong to many cultures at once. Do you agree? How might this apply to you?

How do you learn about people’s cultures?

Start by becoming aware of your own culture.

It may seem odd that in order to learn about people in other cultures, we start by becoming more aware of our own culture. But we believe this is true. Why?

If you haven’t had a chance to understand how your culture has affected you first hand, it’s more difficult to understand how it could affect anyone else or why it might be important to them. If you are comfortable talking about your own culture, then you will become better at listening to others talk about theirs. Or, if you understand how discrimination has affected you, then you may be more aware of how it has affected others.

Here are some tips on how to becoming more aware of your own culture:

What is your culture?

Do you have a culture? Do you have more than one? What is your cultural background?

Even if you don’t know who your ancestors are, you have a culture. Even if you are a mix of many cultures, you have one. Culture evolves and changes all the time. It came from your ancestors from many generations ago, and it comes from your family and community today.

In addition to the cultural groups we belong to, we also each have groups we identify with, such as being a parent, an athlete, an immigrant, a small business owner, or a wage worker. These kinds of groups, although not exactly the same as a culture, have similarities to cultural groups. For example, being a parent or and an immigrant may be an identity that influences how you view the world and how the world views you. Becoming aware of your different identities can help you understand what it might be like to belong to a cultural group.

Exercise:

Try listing all the cultures and identities you have: (This is just a list of suggestions to get you started. Add as many as you think describe you.)

What is your:

Religion
Nationality
Race
Sexual identity
Ethnicity
Occupation
Marital status
Age
Geographic region

Are you:

A female
A male
Disabled
From an urban area
From a rural area
A parent
A student

Have you ever been:

In the military
Poor
In prison
Wealthy
In the middle class
In the working class

Did this help you think about your identities and cultures? How have these different cultures and identities affected your life?

How do you build relationships with people from other cultures?

There are many ways that people can learn about other people’s cultures and build relationships at the same time. Here are some steps you can take. They are first listed, and then elaborated upon one at a time.

  • Make a conscious decision to establish friendships with people from other cultures.
  • Put yourself in situations where you will meet people of other cultures.
  • Examine your biases about people from other cultures.
  • Ask people questions about their cultures, customs, and views.
  • Read about other people’s culture’s and histories
  • Listen to people tell their stories
  • Notice differences in communication styles and values; don’t assume that the majority’s way is the right way
  • Risk making mistakes
  • Learn to be an ally.

Make a conscious decision to establish friendships with people from other cultures

Making a decision is the first step. In order to build relationships with people different from yourself, you have to make a concerted effort to do so. There are societal forces that serve to separate us from each other. People from different economic groups, religions, ethnic groups, and races are often isolated from each other in schools, jobs, and neighborhoods. So, if we want things to be different, we need to take active steps to make them different.

You can join a sports team or club, become active in an organization, choose a job, or move to a neighborhood that puts you in contact with people of cultures different than your own. Also, you may want to take a few minutes to notice the diversity that is presently nearby. If you think about the people you see and interact with every day, you may become more aware of the cultural differences that are around you.

Once you have made the decision to make friends with people different from yourself, you can go ahead and make friends with them in much the same way as with anyone else. You may need to take more time, and you may need to be more persistent. You may need to reach out and take the initiative more than you are used to. People who have been mistreated by society may take more time to trust you than people who haven’t. Don’t let people discourage you. There are good reasons why people have built up defenses, but it is not impossible to overcome them and make a connection. The effort is totally worth it.

Put yourself in situations where you will meet people of other cultures; especially if you haven’t had the experience of being a minority, take the risk.

One of the first and most important steps is to show up in places where you will meet people of cultures other than your own. Go to meetings and celebrations of groups whose members you want to get to know. Or hang out in restaurants and other gathering places that different cultural groups go. You may feel embarrassed or shy at first, but your efforts will pay off. People of a cultural group will notice if you take the risk of coming to one of their events. If it is difficult for you to be the only person like yourself attending, you can bring a buddy with you and support each other in making friends.

Examine your biases about people from other cultures.

We all carry misinformation and stereotypes about people in different cultures. Especially, when we are young, we acquire this information in bits and pieces from TV, from listening to people talk, and from the culture at large. We are not bad people because we acquired this; no one requested to be misinformed. But in order to build relationships with people of different cultures, we have to become aware of the misinformation we acquired.

An excellent way to become aware of your own stereotypes is to pick groups that you generalize about and write down your opinions. Once you have, examine the thoughts that came to your mind and where you acquired them.

Another way to become aware of stereotypes is to talk about them with people who have similar cultures to your own. In such settings you can talk about the misinformation you acquired without being offensive to people from a particular group. You can get together with a friend or two and talk about how you acquired stereotypes or fears of other different people. You can answer these kinds of questions:

  • How did your parents feel about different ethnic, racial, or religious groups?
  • What did your parents communicate to you with their actions and words?
  • Were your parents friends with people from many different groups?
  • What did you learn in school about a particular group?
  • Was there a lack of information about some people?
  • Are there some people you shy away from? Why?

Ask people questions about their cultures, customs, and views

People, for the most part, want to be asked questions about their lives and their cultures. Many of us were told that asking questions was nosy; but if we are thoughtful, asking questions can help you learn about people of different cultures and help build relationships. People are usually pleasantly surprised when others show interest in their cultures. If you are sincere and you can listen, people will tell you a lot.

Read about other people’s cultures and histories

It helps to read about and learn about people’s cultures and histories. If you know something about the reality of someone’s life and history, it shows that you care enough to take the time to find out about it. It also gives you background information that will make it easier to ask questions that make sense.

However, you don’t have to be an expert on someone’s culture to get to know them or to ask questions. People who are, themselves, from a culture are usually the best experts, anyway.

Don’t forget to care and show caring

It is easy to forget that the basis of any relationship is caring. Everyone wants to care and be cared about. Caring about people is what makes a relationship real. Don’t let your awkwardness around cultural differences get in the way of caring about people.

Listen to people tell their stories

If you get an opportunity to hear someone tell you her life story first hand, you can learn a lot–and build a strong relationship at the same time. Every person has an important story to tell. Each person’s story tells something about their culture.

Listening to people’s stories, we can get a fuller picture of what people’s lives are like–their feelings, their nuances, and the richness of their lives. Listening to people also helps us get through our numbness– there is a real person before us, not someone who is reduced to stereotypes in the media.

Additionally, listening to members of groups that have been discriminated against can give us a better understanding of what that experience is like. Listening gives us a picture of discrimination that is more real than what we can get from reading an article or listening to the radio.

Exercise:

You can informally ask people in your neighborhood or organization to tell you a part of their life stories as a member of a particular group. You can also incorporate this activity into a workshop or retreat for your group or organization. Have people each take five or ten minutes to talk about one piece of their life stories. If the group is large, you will probably have to divide into small groups, so everyone gets a chance to speak.

Notice differences in communication styles and values; don’t assume that the majority’s way is the right way.

We all have a tendency to assume that the way that most people do things is the acceptable, normal, or right way. As community workers, we need to learn about cultural differences in values and communication styles, and not assume that the majority way is the right way to think or behave.

Example:

You are in a group discussion. Some group members don’t speak up, while others dominate, filling all the silences. The more vocal members of the group become exasperated that others don’t talk. It also seems that the more vocal people are those that are members of the more mainstream culture, while those who are less vocal are from minority cultures.

How do we understand this? How can this be resolved?

In some cultures, people feel uncomfortable with silence, so they speak to fill the silences. In other cultures, it is customary to wait for a period of silence before speaking. If there aren’t any silences, people from those cultures may not ever speak. Also, members of some groups (women, people of low income, some racial and ethnic minorities, and others) don’t speak up because they have received messages from society at large that their contribution is not as important as others; they have gotten into the habit of deferring their thinking to the thinking of others.

When some people don’t share their thinking, we all lose out. We all need the opinions and voices of those people who have traditionally been discouraged from contributing.

In situations like the one described above, becoming impatient with people for not speaking is usually counter-productive. However, you can structure a meeting to encourage the quieter people to speak. For example, you can:

  • Have people break into pairs before discussing a topic in the larger group.
  • At certain times have each person in the circle make a comment. (People can pass if they want to.)
  • Follow a guideline that everyone speaks once, before anyone speaks twice.
  • Invite the quieter people to lead part of the meeting.
  • Talk about the problem openly in a meeting, and invite the more vocal people to try to speak less often.
  • Between meetings, ask the quieter people what would help them speak, or ask them for their ideas on how a meeting should be run.

A high school basketball team has to practice and play on many afternoons and evenings. One team member is a recent immigrant whose family requires her to attend the birthday parties of all the relatives in her extended family. The coach is angry with the parents for this requirement, because it takes his player away from the team.

How do we understand this? How can this be resolved?

Families have different values, especially when it comes to family closeness, loyalty, and responsibility. In many immigrant and ethnic families, young people are required to put their family’s needs first, before the requirements of extra-curricular activities. Young people from immigrant families who grow up in the U.S. often feel torn between the majority culture and the culture of their families; they feel pressure from each cultures to live according to its values, and they feel they have to choose between the two.

As community workers, we need to support and respect minority and immigrant families and their values. It may already be a huge concession on the part of a family to allow a teenager to participate in extracurricular activities at all. We need to make allowances for the cultural differences and try to help young people feel that they can have both worlds–instead of having to reject one set of values for another.

As community builders, it helps to develop relationships with parents. If a young person sees her parents have relationships with people from the mainstream culture, it can help her feel that their family is accepted. It supports the teen in being more connected to her family and her community–and also, both relationships are critical protective factors for drug and alcohol abuse and other dangerous behaviors. In addition, in building relationships with parents, we develop lines of communication, so when conflicts arise, they can be more easily resolved.

Risk making mistakes

As you are building relationships with people who have different cultural backgrounds than your own, you will probably make mistakes at some point. That happens. Don’t let making mistakes of making mistakes keep you from going ahead and building relationships.

If you say or do something that is insensitive, you can learn something from it. Ask the affected person what you bothered or offended them, apologize, and then go on in building the relationship. Don’t let guilt bog you down.

Learn to be an ally

One of the best ways to help you build relationships with people of different cultures is to demonstrate that you are willing to take a stand against discrimination when it occurs. People will be much more motivated to get to know you if they see that you are willing to take risks on their behalf.

We also have to educate ourselves and keep informed so that we understand the issues that each group faces and we become involved in their struggles–instead of sitting on the sidelines and watching from a distance.

In Summary

Friendship is powerful. It is our connection to each other that gives meaning to our lives. Our caring for each other is often what motivates us to make change. And establishing connections with people from diverse backgrounds can be key in making significant changes in our communities.

As individuals, and in groups, we can change our communities. We can set up neighborhoods and institutions in which people commit themselves to working to form strong relationships and alliances with people of diverse cultures and backgrounds. We can establish networks and coalitions in which people are knowledgeable about each other’s struggles, and are willing to lend a hand. Together, we can do it.

Contributor
Marya Axner

Online Resources

Brown University Training MaterialsCultural Competence and Community Studies: Concepts and Practices for Cultural Competence The Northeast Education Partnership provides online access to PowerPoint training slides on topics in research ethics and cultural competence in environmental research. These have been created for professionals/students in environmental sciences, health, and policy; and community-based research. If you are interested in receiving an electronic copy of one the presentations, just download their Materials Request Form (found on the main Training Presentations page under “related files”), complete the form, and email it to NEEPethics@yahoo.com.

The Center for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services collects and describes early childhood/early intervention resources and serves as point of exchange for users.

Culture Matters is a cross-cultural training workbook developed by the Peace Corps to help new volunteers acquire the knowledge and skills to work successfully and respectfully in other cultures.

The International & Cross-Cultural Evaluation Topical Interest Group, an organization that is affiliated with the American Evaluation Association, provides evaluators who are interested in cross-cultural issues with opportunities for professional development.

The Multicultural Pavilion offers resources and dialogue for educators, students and activists on all aspects of multicultural education.

The National Center for Cultural Competence at Georgetown University increases the capacity of health care and mental health programs to design, implement and evaluate culturally and linguistically competent service delivery systems. Publications and web links available.

SIL International makes available “The Stranger’s Eyes,” an article that speaks to cultural sensitivity with questions that can be strong tools for discussion.

Study, Discussion and Action on Issues of Race, Racism and Inclusion – a partial list of resources utilized and prepared by Yusef Mgeni.

Organizations:

Center for Living Democracy
289 Fox Farm Rd
PO Box 8187
Brattleboro, VT 05304-8187
(802) 254-1234

National Coalition Building Institute (NCBI)
1835 K Street, N.W., Suite 715
Washington, D.C. 20006
(202) 785-9400

Re-evaluation Counseling
719 Second Avenue North
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 284-0113

Southern Poverty Law Center
400 Washington Ave.
Montgomery, AL 36104

Print Resource

Axner, D. (1993). The Community leadership project curriculum. Pomfret, CT: Topsfield Foundation.

Banks, J. (1997). Educating citizens in a multicultural society. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Brown, C.,& Mazza, G. (1997). Healing into action. Washington, DC: National Coalition Building Institute.

DuPraw, M.,& Axner, M. (1997). Working on common cross-cultural communication challenges. In Martha McCoy, et. al., Toward a More Perfect Union in an Age of Diversity. Pomfret, CT: Topsfield Foundation, 12-16.

Ford, C. (1994). We can all get along: 50 steps you can take to end racism. New York, NY: Dell Publishing.

Kaye, G., & Wolff, T. (1995). From the ground up: A workbook on coalition building and community development. Amherst, MA: AHEC/Community Partners. (Available from Tom Wolff and Associates.)

McCoy, M.,&  et al. (1997). Toward a more perfect union in an age of diversity: A guide for building stronger communities through public dialogue. Pomfret, CT: Topsfield Foundation.

McIntosh, P. (1988). White privilege and male privilege: A personal account of coming to see correspondences through work in women’s studies. Wellesley, MA: Center for Research on Women, Wellesley College.

Okihiro, G. (1994). Margins and mainstreams: Asians in American history and culture. Seattle, WA: The University of Washington Press.

Takaki, R. (1993). A different mirror: A history of multicultural America. Boston: Little, Brown and

20 June 2018 Morning Chalk Drawings and World Refugee Day

Hello to you.  How are you?  My mind feels like there are just marshmallows up there lately!  Just a very surreal feeling all around for me lately.  I guess the movie we watched last night was perfect for that!  We finally watched Through the Looking Glass last night and we enjoyed it.  I loved the imagery throughout and Kyle could see many video game inspired sets.  Seeing the Alan Rickman farewell tribute was sad.  I thought his being the voice of a blue butterfly, which symbolizes freedom, was perfect for this being his last film. 

Alice Through the Looking Glass Official Trailer #2 (2016) – Mia Wasikowska, Johnny Depp Movie HD

This morning on the dog walk I saw another neighbors yard that looked like someone had messed with it.  So far there have been three that I’ve seen in our immediate neighborhood.  We aren’t quite sure if the culprit is a human or a large canine that’s getting loose.  It looked like human activity to me.  We are living in a small town that is starting to experience big city problems.  People move to small towns from larger ones and bring their problems along with them.  Taking a young person of whatever age from a place where there friends are, support systems are and where there is more to do and transplanting them into a town like ours can be quite a culture shock for them.  When you are bored, and I know this from being their age once, you sometimes do stupid shit you will regret.  All the things that are going on are things I warned the city council before the growth and development started and it’s so frustrating to see it actually happening.   

http://www.cleburnetimesreview.com/news/vandalism-occurring-at-alvarado-parks-on-a-daily-basis/article_01727e86-7000-11e8-aa1f-9b6b57c211a0.html

“Over at Parkway Park on Monday there was some graffiti of racial slurs,” he said. “It was tagged on some of the benches, the little library and the skate park. It took about four hours to try to remove the paint, which they weren’t able to do all the way so they had to just sand it down and go back later to repaint.”

Alvarado Park board member Terri Fulton said the little free libraries — built and donated by members of the Alvarado Rocks group — have been the most disheartening.

“We’re a little irritated about this,” she said. “You will see that people are constantly refilling them with books, so that means kids are using them. But there’s been spray painting on them and the other day someone busted out the Plexiglass in one of them.”

And then they are talking about growing our town….ironically for the past few days we’ve been unable to properly flush the toilet for lack of water pressure!  This has been an ongoing problem since we moved here in 2009 too!  It’s taken millions of dollars to fix just the plumbing and sewer  infrastructure.  Don’t get me started on the conditions of our roads!   

http://www.cleburnetimesreview.com/news/durington-welcomes-growth-to-alvarado/article_32870120-6b61-11e8-b234-030937a8f7a1.html

“Holden said some of the challenges the mayor discussed during the meeting scare him.

“I’ve got to be able to provide water and I’ve got to be able for you to flush the toilet, and if I can’t, there is a big problem,” he said. “We want people to come [to Alvarado], but if they do we are going to have to do some major improvements to the system. We are working on ways right now, looking at all of the development as a whole. We want to be able to look at the big picture.”

Yep….growing pains on the small town scale and then there is World Refugee Day today and our extremely sad and embarrassing goings on with immigration in my country.  I don’t even know what to do with this in my heart.  It’s a very complex and sensitive issue that can’t be handled with rough hands.  I feel like we have yet to really tackle as a globe the core issues as to “why” it’s happening in the first place.  If people have food, clean water, clothing, shelter, meaningiful work and education opportunities, and they feel safe living where they are (not in the center of crime, violence, slavery and or a war zone) will tend to stay where they are and flourish.  We apparently have oodles of  people without checkmarks in those boxes and are understandably on the move!  

18 5 6 21 7 5 5

R E F U G E E = 67/13/4/2/1

9 13 13 9 7 18 1 14 20

I M M I G R A N T = 104/5 divide by 2 = 2.5 = 7 = 3.5 = 8/4/2/1

Number of refugees worldwide

The total includes 16 million refugees and asylum seekers and 26 million internally displaced people uprooted within their own countries, according to UNHCR’s annual “Global Trends” report released today.

 

Why do immigrants and refugees  keep coming to America?  Part of it has to be money.  Someone is paying them enough money to live here.  I think if our government is going to insist on punishing these people and their children like this, they need to “follow the money.”  In all the articles I’ve looked at about this chronic issue, this element just doesn’t come up.  The blame always seems to fall on the immigrants and refugees for their existing.   Who is hiring these people to be nannies, yard workers, produce pickers, home builders, masons, welders, road construction workers, janitors etc?! 

https://blogs.voanews.com/all-about-america/2015/08/24/most-common-jobs-held-by-immigrants-in-each-us-state/If there is no economic – this article is rather dated but does show interesting information that probably hasn’t changed too much:

Most Common Jobs Held by Immigrants in each US State

There are 41 million foreign-born people living in the United States and a new map illustrates the most common jobs held by those immigrants.

Business Insider  used information from the US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, an ongoing statistical survey that samples a small percentage of the population every year. The data was assembled and processed by the Minnesota Population Center’s Integrated Public Use Microdata Series program.

The map below shows the jobs most commonly held by people who said they were born in a country other than the United States.

Immigrants make up 12.9 percent of the overall population, according to the Center for American Progress. That sounds like a lot of people, but the high point for immigration in the U.S. actually came in 1890, when 14.8 percent of the population was foreign born.

most-common-job-held-by-immigrants-in-each-state-corrected-background

While the map shows that many immigrants are housekeepers, janitors and agricultural workers, the majority of jobs thought to be overwhelmingly worked by non-natives are in fact filled by native-born Americans, according to the Center for Immigration Studies:

  • Maids and housekeepers: 51% native-born
  • Taxi drivers and chauffeurs: 58% native-born
  • Butchers and meat processors: 63% native-born
  • Grounds maintenance workers: 64% native-born
  • Construction laborers: 66% native-born
  • Porters, bellhops, and concierges: 72% native-born
  • Janitors: 73% native-born

Jobs worked by immigrants tend to pay low wages and usually require little formal education. In high-immigrant occupations, 59 percent of the workers have a high school education or lower, compared to 31 percent of the rest of the labor force.

 https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/pope-francis-criticizes-separation-of-immigrant-children-from-their-parents-on-us-border/ar-AAyUlD7

https://www.npr.org/2018/06/19/621065383/what-we-know-family-separation-and-zero-tolerance-at-the-border

https://www.madinamerica.com/2016/11/combining-art-therapy-mindfulness-refugees/ I found this article and it really resonated for me as a way to help promote internal healing for both refugees and the immigrant children we are seeing locked up in detention centers right now: 

Combining Art Therapy and Mindfulness for Refugees

Program in Hong Kong demonstrates the healing power of art therapy and mindfulness for refugees and asylum seekers

A new article, published in The Arts in Psychotherapy, describes the ways art therapy and mindfulness have benefitted refugees and asylum seekers in Hong Kong. The article describes how the program, Inhabited Studio, which provides workshops on art making and mindfulness meditation, has supported individuals in moving forward after traumatic experiences.

“The combination of art therapy and mindfulness helped participants cope day to day and allowed participants to begin to get a sense of not only who they were and what they had lived through, but potentially who they could become,” write the authors, led by Debra Kalmanowitz from the Department of Social Work and Social Administration at the University of Hong Kong.

The increasing number of Syrian refugees has raised the issue of how to support the mental health of individuals who have fled their countries and experienced political violence. An estimated 11 million refugees have left Syria since 2011 and there are over 21 million refugees worldwide. Although the majority of refugees do not develop Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, mental health professionals working with refugees often use a trauma framework.

The authors state:  “It is true that we do not want to medicalize distress and that we cannot take it out of context, and yet we cannot ignore the disadvantaged situation in which asylum seekers live or the suffering they endure.”

Both art therapy and mindfulness have been used with survivors of trauma. This theoretical article “considers how the combination of art therapy and mindfulness in work with refugees acknowledges human suffering and traumatic events while at the same time recognises the resilience that exists and the search for healing, health and growth.”

The authors describe the ways art therapy and mindfulness have been combined to provide support for refugees and asylum seekers at Inhabited Studio in Hong Kong. Inhabited Studio is a short-term group program that uses a holistic approach and provides workshops over an 8 day period. “The presence of the group allowed for the individuals to be seen, witnessed and heard (even without words) and in so doing served to share and normalize behavior and expression,” write the authors. The authors outline nine features found in the work at Inhabited Studio that may be used as broader guides for providing support to refugees.

Safety: Establishing a sense of safety is one of the most basic needs after experiencing a trauma and the authors note that it “is an on-going process and not something that is established once and maintained.” The authors found that art therapy and meditation assisted individuals in regulating their emotions, which aided in regaining a sense of emotional safety.

Doing versus thinking: The authors explain that art therapy and mindfulness emphasize doing, and describe the importance of an experiential approach. “Art making and mindfulness meditation demand a focus of the mind through activity or inactivity, action or inaction, through direct experience,” write the authors.

Changing our relationship to our thoughts and feelings: “Making art externalizes our thoughts and feelings and creates a distance between them” while “mindfulness effects relationship too; rather than trying to control the thoughts and feelings, there is an emphasis on acknowledgment and acceptance of them,” explain the authors.

Time: According to the authors, “trauma can trap a person in the past.” Since both the creative process and mindfulness are grounded in the present moment, they can be helpful activities for those who are overwhelmed by memories.

Making meaning: Meaning making involves both making sense of the trauma and of one’s current experiences. The authors explain how art therapy and mindfulness can assist in meaning making because “both lead to an awareness of the self and the context of the self in relation to the event, the group, the culture, the violence and or society.” To illustrate this, one of the participants of Inhabited Studio reported, “I am very proud of this drawing… it tells me something very clear that I did not know.”

Flexibility: Individuals who have experienced trauma may get stuck in their thinking patterns. The creative process can facilitate mental flexibility, and mindfulness can make it easier to tolerate intense negative emotions and still return to an emotional equilibrium.

Catharsis: “Art therapy can facilitate the expression of feelings that are associated with the trauma, suffering, and coping, such as anger, rage, vulnerability, depression, frustration or joy and pleasure. This can lead to a sense of relief as well as reveal that which was previously unconscious,” explain the authors.

Increased self-awareness and self-knowledge: Both self-awareness and self-knowledge can be promoted by art making and mindfulness practices. One participant described how the process of making multiple pieces of art helped her to clarify her emotions, “I have many mixed feelings although I am looking towards a better future. So the next painting I tried to sort out the colours to help me next time to be more focused… to know exactly what I want.”

Coping with loss: The authors report, “Art therapy and mindfulness together allowed for the expression of loss and also to begin a process of the formation of a new identity… It took strength and imagination to create a new identity and the open structure, along with the non-judgemental attitude of the Studio provided the potential.”

“Political violence has far-reaching effects. It can challenge the community and society, lead to fragmentation and destruction and impact on culture at large. Political violence impacts on the individual and can lead to the breakdown of relationships between individuals, community and society itself,” write the authors. Refugees and asylum seekers who have experienced trauma and political violence deserve support services that do not pathologize their experiences, but instead honor both their suffering and strength.

The focus on art therapy for refugees is part of a larger trend to explore how art can be used in therapeutic ways (for example, art therapy for veterans with PTSD or for individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, and music therapy for children and adolescents). The authors in the present article state that the “overlap between art therapy and mindfulness in this context represent the realities of the suffering of the participants as well as the possibility of working towards enhancing coping and resilience.”

Kalmanowitz, D., & Ho, R. T. (2016). Out of our mind. Art therapy and mindfulness with refugees, political violence and trauma. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 49, 57-65. (Abstract)

 

Here are some links to some music I was exploring this morning.  I am on the hunt for new sounds and this Electro Swing and Modern Jazz struck a chord:

Club Des Belugas – The Beat Is Rhythm

Orkestra Obsolete play Blue Monday using 1930s instruments – BBC Arts – I love the version done by Orgy for this song so finding this tickled me.

Electro Swing Collection – ads in between

Published on Dec 2, 2014

PLAYLIST OF INDIVIDUAL SONGS
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6-TW…

SONGS
0:00:00 Parov Stelar – All Night
0:02:42 Jamie Berry (ft Rosie Harte) – Peeping Tom
0:06:12 Scott Bradlee & Post Modern Jukebox – Thrift Shop (Baker&Bart Electro Swing Remix)
0:09:59 Parov Stelar – The Mojo Radio Gang
0:12:38 Lionel Hampton – It Don’t Mean A Thing
0:16:14 Caravan Palace – Dragons
0:20:27 Tape Five – Geraldines Routine
0:23:32 Caravan Palace – Suzy
0:27:40 Jamie Berry (ft Octavia Rose) – Delight
0:33:24 Dunkelbunt (Ft Boban) – Cinnamon Girl
0:37:20 Jamie Berry – Sweet Rascal
0:41:28 Parov Stelar – Booty Swing
0:44:40 Parov Stelar – Libella Swing
0:49:00 Parov Stelar – Catgroove
0:53:29 Parov Stelar – Chambermaid Swing
0:59:15 Jamie Berry – Dirty Stop Out
1:05:25 Parov Stelar – Beatbuddy Swing
1:09:44 Parov Stelar – Josephine

 

19 June 2018 Digital Time Travel

Hello to you.  How is your here and now as you visit here?  I hope you are well in mind, body and spirit.  I hope if you have hit a rough patch in your life, whatever it is, that you have an excellent support system and a path out charted….that you are being loved through whatever you are facing.

In learning you will teach, and in teaching you will learn.
Phil Collins

May you experience each day as a sacred gift woven around the heart of wonder.
John O’Donohue

We’re all just walking each other home.
Ram Dass

I time traveled a bit this morning to 17 Sept 2015 when Kyle and I visited the Ft. Worth Botanical Gardens. This is so beautiful. If we lived in a non-drought part of the world I would love to have this in my backyard. Great for meditation!

Today I did some digital time traveling to the 1980’s and just a couple of years ago.  Isn’t it amazing how easily we can do that now?  The only glitch I have is I guess how I label my pictures when I save them.  I guess I’m using too many words which confuses my computer later when I go looking for things.   It’s almost to the point I want to go back to saving stuff on CD’s lol.

Since my formative years took place in the 1980’s, my favorite music and many of my best memories are locked into that time zone.  I think this is probably the case for folks my age.  The internet has lots of funny meme’s about the 1980’s.  Since I’m limited on my picture space, which I’ve been rapidly filling again lol, I’ll just share this one:

19 June 2018 – I was in an 80’s nostalgia mood this morning and found this – too funny!

Eddy Grant – Electric Avenue (Official Music Video)   – for those that don’t get the meme, this is the song it’s about

I try to listen to many different types of music from as many realms as possible, but few genres of music affect me as positively as music from the 80’s does.  A lot of the music I hear now sounds the same.  Every once in awhile I’ll hear something that catches me but a lot of times it’s older groups.

18 June 2018 Fragile Stasis (Drawing) and Stasis – Point of No Return (1993 song)

Just stopping by to say hello.  I hope this finds you well in mind, body and spirit.

18 June 2018 – Drawing I did this morning hoping rain clouds would come and wash it away….nope! I was thinking about the fragile stasis of our world bound together by the elements of nature.

19 20 1 19 9 19

S T A S I S = 87/15/6/3 cycle

In the heat of summer boredom, the word Stasis took me to many different places.  On my digital travels I found this song done in 1993 that took me to familiar musical grounds.  It’s very reminiscent of the style of Hearts of Space, Art of Noise, Tangerine Dream, Vangelis, etc.  Hope you enjoy it too.

Stasis – Point Of No Return

sta·sis
[ˈstāsis]

NOUN
formal
technical
  1. a period or state of inactivity or equilibrium.
    “long periods of stasis” ·

    [more]
    “creative stasis”
    synonyms: inactivity · inaction · inactiveness · inertness · passivity · apathy ·

    [more]
    antonyms: activity · energy
  2. civil strife.

 

17 June 2018 Drawings and Positive Reality Television

Hello to you.  Not tired yet so figured I would go ahead and put this together now.  Today has been a good day.  A cloud went by this morning and left a couple droplets for us but nothing heavy yet.  We are getting those fissures in the backyard where the earth splits wide and deep enough I can put an entire tree branch down in it!  It’s feast or famine for us when it comes to rain.

Kyle and I started watching a fun show called 100% Hotter on Netflix.  It’s one of those shows where a train wreck of a person shows up dressed how they like to dress and then gets transformed by a fashion consultant, hair dresser and makeup artist.  We are watching this show for the same reason we love the Queer Eye show and loved Tattoo Nightmares.  We enjoy watching shows where help people become a better version of themselves.  It’s uplifting to watch caring people help someone who doesn’t have a very high opinion of themselves or don’t really know that they are amazing.

There are so many young people in our world that use over the top hair, makeup, style/clothes as literal body armor to get through this life when they should be able to be who they are without all that.  It’s fun to dress up for cosplay, for Halloween or parties but some people wear these things all the time.  It’s truly amazing to see who has been hiding when they remove the fake tan, the layers of foundation, eye makeup and lipstick.  Such truly beautiful spirits.  We are about 5 episodes into the show and the only complaints we really have are some of the clothing choices and the rating system where they go and ask people to rate how they see the people they are working with.  Sometimes that is pretty brutal.  Other than that is just amazing what these folks manage to do for these people that come in.

100% Hotter Wednesday at 8pm on 5STAR

We are really enjoying Queer Eye for so many reasons.  They are not just taking somebody and dressing them up.  These guys are tackling the whole person and have been touching on some very sensitive issues in such a beautiful way.  They have dealt with the really sensitive subject of the relationship between blacks and police.  They have dealt with Christianity and homosexuality.  They have shown someone coming out after many years to their parent.  They have dealt with isolation and have gotten into the “why’s” behind why people sometimes let themselves go or isolate themselves from the world.  Kyle and I watch this show and are like, we need these guys to come to our house.  They also have done some AMAZING transformations to the living spaces of the people they work with.

Queer Eye | Official Trailer [HD] | Netflix

I found this song I’ve never heard before and thought it was perfect for this theme:

Francesca Battistelli Free To Be Me Lyrics

“Free To Be Me”

 

At twenty years of age I’m still looking for a dream
A war’s already waged for my destiny
But You’ve already won the battle
And You’ve got great plans for me
Though I can’t always see’Cause I got a couple dents in my fender
Got a couple rips in my jeans
Try to fit the pieces together
But perfection is my enemy
On my own I’m so clumsy
But on Your shoulders I can see
I’m free to be me

When I was just a girl I thought I had it figured out
My life would turn out right, and I’d make it here somehow
But things don’t always come that easy
And sometimes I would doubt

‘Cause I got a couple dents in my fender
Got a couple rips in my jeans
Try to fit the pieces together
But perfection is my enemy
On my own I’m so clumsy
But on Your shoulders I can see
I’m free to be me

And you’re free to be you

Sometimes I believe that I can do anything
Yet other times I think I’ve got nothing good to bring
But You look at my heart and You tell me
That I’ve got all You seek
And it’s easy to believe
Even though

‘Cause I got a couple dents in my fender
Got a couple rips in my jeans
Try to fit the pieces together
But perfection is my enemy
On my own I’m so clumsy
But on Your shoulders I can see
I’m free to be me

 

 

17 June 2018 Love note, Father’s Day and Ladder to Pleiades (Michael P. Branch)

Hello to you.  How are you?  We are waking up and enjoying a bit of cool this morning….still no rain but I have faith it will arrive right on time.  It always does.

There was a beautiful love note in the mail box this morning from my beautiful cousin and it was a great way to start off this day!  She is one of those earth angels that lives too far away but lets me know she’s there for me just when I need it!  Thank you cousin!   I love you!

Starting off the day with such a message of love is a perfect for Father’s Day.  This morning I am reminded of how blessed I am to have and to have had so many amazing men in my life.  My Dad, my husband, my Grandpa’s, my Uncles, Kyle’s Dad and his Grandpa when he was here.  Kyle’s brother Mark is not only a Father but celebrating his birthday today too.  Amazing men who do not carry their extra titles in life lightly.   They do anything and everything they can to make the lives of those they love and care about better in their own ways.

My Dad can be best symbolized by one thing, a heart.  He is the type of man who would do anything for you and not expect anything in return.  I feel like he loves and cares for me without too many conditions lol.  Having a daughter like me isn’t always very easy!  It’s hard living far away and not being able to see each other very often.  So when we do get time together we make it count!

Heart cloud over our house (19 Aug 2017)

The Dad of our house is my sunshine, my sweetheart….my everything.  We didn’t choose to have two-legged children but we still consider ourselves a family.

This made me think of my Dad and I sitting out back using his telescope to look at the moon together when I was a young girl:

http://www.dailygood.org/more.php?n=5506

Ladder to the Pleiades

MY DAUGHTER, Hannah Virginia, who recently turned three years old, is teaching me about the stars. Far from being a liability to her, my own profound astronomical ignorance has turned out to be her boon and, through her, a boon to me as well. The most important thing the kid has taught me is the brilliant, open secret that if you don’t go outside and look up, you won’t see anything. Every night before bedtime she takes my hand and insists that I get my bedraggled ass up and take her outside to look at the stars. If this sounds easy, ask yourself if you can match her record of going out every single night to observe the sky — something she has done without fail for more than a year now. That she has somehow brought her celestially illiterate father along is more amazing still.

Following the inexorable logic that makes a kid’s universe so astonishing, Hannah insists on looking for stars no matter the weather. At first I attempted the rational, grown-up answer: “It just isn’t clear enough to see anything tonight, honey.” But her response, which is always the same, is so emphatic and ingenuous that it is irresistible: “Dad, we can always check.” And so we check. And it is when we check that the rewards of lifting my head up and out of another long day come into focus. One cold and windy night we stepped out and discovered, through a momentary break in an impossibly thick mat of clouds, a stunning view of Sirius blazing low in the southeast. Another evening we stood in an unusual late-winter fog and saw nothing — but then we heard the courtship hooting of a nearby great horned owl, followed immediately by the distant yelping of coyotes up in the hills. We even stand out in snowstorms to stargaze, and while we’ve never seen any stars on those white nights, we’ve seen and felt and smelled the crisp shimmering that arrives only on the wings of a big January storm. Snow or no snow, Hannah knows those stars are up there, so she does easily what is somehow difficult for many of us grown-ups: she looks for them. And whether she sees stars or not, in seeking them every evening she has forged an unbreakable relation with the world-within-a-world that is night.

Questions are the waypoints along which Hannah’s orbit around things can be plotted, and she has asked so many questions about stars for so many nights in a row that at last I’ve been compelled to learn enough to answer some of them. In doing so I’ve stumbled into placing myself, my family, my home, on the cosmic map whose points of reference wheel across the sky. We’ve learned a surprising number of stars and constellations together. Now that we’re in our second year of performing our nightly ritual, we’re also having the gratifying experience of seeing our favorite summer stars, long gone in the high-desert winter, come round again on the year’s towering, dark clock.

The other evening after supper, my wife asked Hannah to make a wish. Without hesitating she replied, “I wish I could have a ladder tall enough to reach the stars.” As usual, I didn’t know what to say. It is impossible to dismiss a three-year-old kid when she articulates hopes that are at once so perfectly reasonable and so beautifully impossible.

Before she goes to sleep, Hannah and I look at the six-dollar cardboard star wheel I bought to help us identify constellations. Too tired to make much of it, I toss the disk down on her bed in mild frustration. She picks it up, holds it upright in front of her in both hands, stares earnestly out beyond the walls of her room, and begins to turn it left and right as if it were a steering wheel.

“Where’re you going?” I ask.

“Pleiades,” she says. “You want to come?”

Michael P. Branch is professor of literature and environment at the University of Nevada, Reno; book review editor of the journal ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment; and coeditor of the University of Virginia Press book series Under the Sign of Nature: Explorations in Ecocriticism. His books include John Muir’s Last Journey: South to the Amazon and East to Africa (Island Press, 2001) and Reading the Roots: American Nature Writing before Walden (University of Georgia Press, 2004). Branch has contributed to a number of magazines including OrionEcotoneSlateIsotopeHawk and HandshawWhole Terrain, Utne ReaderPlaces, and Red Rock Review. He also writes a monthly blog essay, called “Rants from the Hill,” for High Country News.

 

16 June 2018 The World Goo, Authentic Self and Love

16 June 2018 – I’ve been wanting to draw these flowers a lot lately.

Hello to you.  How are you from wherever and whenever you are stopping to visit from?  I hope this finds you well in mind, body and spirit today.  We are doing well here.  Had a nice walk this morning.  Saw a neighbor out running that I hadn’t seen in awhile and had just been wondering how he was!  He never speaks to us, but as someone who used to run a lot, I understand he’s trying to get some time alone.  We went by one of the last work sites in the new development and heard the workers playfully bantering and being silly together.  It made me smile to hear them being so happy to be working.  Last night was free of the stuff that was going on last night but Kyle was up at 3 am instead!  Ugh!

The phrase “Be You” has been coming to me a lot lately.  Normally I embrace it as a positive creed but these days it occurs to me that phrase can ring hollow for most people.  Most people, to include myself at times, don’t even know what those two words together mean!  Be you?!  A nice phrase if you already have some idea of who you are or who you want to be!

In today’s world it is hard to separate yourself from all the worldly “goo” that tries to get into all your particles.  I have been here 50 years and that’s a lot of goo to be exposed to lol!  It’s almost a daily effort to sort myself….to keep from being overcome by the goo of life outside this house.  Unless you go completely “off the grid,”  and I mean all that’s modern in your house is a flushing toilet, there is no true escape!

What it means to “Be You” can sometimes mean a very lonely and isolated existence if you aren’t careful.   We have been living in the same place for nearly 9 years and have may be one person near us we can truly say is just beyond an acquaintance.

Something that helped me a lot in recent years was attending a couple of Level 1 Quantum Touch energy healing classes.  I learned that if you focus on what you love the most in life you can raise your energy vibration to heal yourself and to help others with healing (inside and out).

Have you ever felt that warm wash across your chest when you see someone you care about, doing something you truly enjoy, hearing a great message,  hold your significant other, dog, cat, or other special being in your life, hear a favorite song,  see a beautiful sight?  That’s what love energy feels like.  It can be a barometer for staying in “your center” or the space of your heart and help you navigate around the world goo.

Love energy is one way I have found that helps me stay true to myself, to know who I am.  When I am not feeling my heart energy then I know I have drifted away from my authentic self.

Quantum-Touch: The Power to Heal – I’ve experienced healing and shared this with others helping them heal.  It really works.  Usually, when I’ve shared this, the healing starts at the emotional/spiritual (inside) level first.    What I like most about this modality is Richard’s emphasis on who is the healer.  The healer is the person getting well! 

 

Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive.
Dalai Lama

 

15 June 2018 Rough Night (dreams) and Blessed are the Peacemakers (drawing)

14 June 2018 – took this yesterday afternoon. One of my favorite sights is the sun coming through clouds.

Hello to you.  How are you?  I’m not sure how I’m doing lol.  Last night was really rough.  At about 1020 am I woke up screaming.  I thought I saw something coming down from the ceiling over my head.  Link was like, “PINEAPPLES!”  He doesn’t like it when I get upset.  We all went back to sleep and then around 1053 am I had a waking dream where it was like Kyle was at the end of the bed, I could see his shadow on the living room wall.  He was telling something off and then I heard a voice in my head “turn on the light”, so I did.  Well Kyle and dogs said screw  you Mommy and left the room after being woke up yet again.  Everything was fine until about 6:05 am when I heard a man’s voice that sounded like Kyle on my side of the bed, in my head, not with my ears say, “Because I have something to tell yah.”  This startled me awake especially since Kyle was snoring on the other side of the bed!

Not quite sure what’s going on.  The last time I woke up screaming because I thought something was on the ceiling was a couple of months ago when I was having a cycle.  I’m sure there is some logical explanation for it all.  Have you ever heard someone in your head but not with your ears before?

This morning I saw in the headlines that a man of peace, an journalist from India was shot after leaving his work.  My prayers to all who loved him:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/14/world/asia/kashmir-journalist-killed.html

Kashmiri Journalist Shujaat Bukhari, a Voice for Peace, Is Killed

My evening drawing could be for him and all those in the world like him that have tried and are still trying to bring people together in this world:

http://biblehub.com/niv/matthew/5.htm – This message came to mind when I was doing my drawings yesterday.

9Blessed are the peacemakers,

for they will be called children of God.

15 5 1 3 5 13 1 11 5 18

P E A C E M A K E R = 77/14/5 divided by 2 = 2.5 = 7 divided by 2 = 3.5 = 8/4/2/1

3 8 9 12 4 18 5 14

C H I L D R E N = 73/10/1