17 Jan 2018 Nostalgia (I HAVE THE POWER! – He-man and She-ra) and Authenticity in acting

Hello to you.  It’s 7:56 am on this very cold Wednesday morning.  How are you?  I’ve got some stuff on my mind this morning and some of it is positive and some of it may be not so much.  I’ve allowed someone power over me via the vehicle of their craft and I am using this tool here to help me out with it.

The positive is Kyle and I have nearly devoured a wonderful and nostalgic show from Netflix called The Toys That Made Us.  Last night it was Barbie, which was in my wheelhouse for so many years and this morning it was He-man which was more in Kyle’s and after watching it, wish it had been more in mine!  I want to be like She-ra!  Watching this episode was so effective LOL!  I didn’t know that Skeletor (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skeletor) was inspired by one of the creators (Mark Taylor http://www.vaultsofgrayskull.co.uk/taylor.html) actually encountering a real corpse in a fun house (think it was this one: http://www.the13thfloor.tv/2016/03/16/real-corpse-found-in-california-funhouse-the-bizarre-life-death-of-elmer-mccurdy/)

The Toys That Made Us en Netflix

Authenticity – Acting Versus living a part

The not so positive part has to do with seeing a trailer this morning for a show being released that feels like an unintentional mockumentary of my actual life experiences only at a reversed social stratum’s perspective.  I’ve actually lived through substance abuse and the huge debris field it scattered for myself and anyone brave enough to try and help me.  I’ve actually spent time in the mental health system and been housed in it’s “facilities.”  It was not  a comical experience and anyone else who has lived through that would probably say the same thing.   More a horror/shit show than a comedy.  Only someone who has no idea of what that might feel like would want to dabble in it.  Watching the trailer was visceral and made me feel very “dark” and hurt inside.  It probably hurts me because of who is starring in it.  Without meaning to, (he doesn’t know who the fuck I am lol, he’s just working) it feels like he’s mocking a very painful part of my life experience with this show.  From the comments I saw for the trailer, there are plenty of people can’t wait to watch it.  Probably fans, like I’ve been on more than one occasion,  who will watch anything with certain names attached to it just because  whether it’s worth watching or not.

All this said, I will acknowledge that it’s probably safer for actors who haven’t struggled with these issues to play these parts than people who actually have.  Playing a role from a personal hell escaped can lead to very tragic consequences.  Case in point is deceased actor Corey Monteith from a show I once enjoyed called Glee:

https://www.usmagazine.com/entertainment/news/cory-monteiths-mccanick-movie-review-daring-performance-before-death-201399/

Cory Monteith‘s memory will live on through his intense final performance in McCanick. The 31-year-old late Glee actor, who died from a heroin and alcohol overdose on July 13, stars in the Josh C. Waller-directed film, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival on Monday, Sept. 9. Monteith has a meaty role in the small, dark, dreary and slow-moving drama.

Monteith plays small-time drug dealer and hustler Simon Weeks, who had a tough-luck childhood and turned to working the streets. Monteith is first seen in a hoodie with stringy hair, talking tough and smoking a cigarette. It is a startling change from those used to seeing him sing and dance as Finn Hudson on Glee.

Simon is being relentlessly targeted by a grizzled, tortured detective, played by David Morse. It is unclear as to why the cop is obsessed with him, though he may possibly have been linked with a congressman’s murder. Confusing flashbacks muddle the story further, and the only way to differentiate between past and present is by looking at the length of Monteith’s hair.

Though Simon is hard-living, Monteith is inspired casting. The sweetness that endeared him to Glee fans still lurks within this character. And he uses it to his advantage during crucial plot twists. As troubled as he is, you are rooting for him to make it out alive. It’s a fine, daring performance.

“He was excited. He was very happy with it, with the work that he had done,” director Josh C. Waller told Us Weekly of the late actor. “He seemed moved, emotionally. He sent me a really beautiful email [when the film wrapped] just stating how much excitement he had and how much pride he had on the work that he had done. Which I’m glad, because I know I thought he did an incredible job. Sometimes, for actors, it’s hard to watch themselves on screen or to acknowledge when they’ve done a good job. He didn’t come right out and say, ‘I did great!’ But he was very proud.”

Monteith’s other movie at the Toronto International Film Festival, All The Wrong Reasons, won the Discovery Award on Monday, Sept. 9. The Gia Milani-directed film also stars Kevin Zegers.

So…..what to say?  I HAVE THE POWER!!  The power is in my case, not to tune in. 

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16 Jan 2018 A Swamp filled with Lions and Crocodiles (Dream) and Resilience

15 Jan 2018 – Drawing from yesterday. The word Untangled came to mind – the beauty of complete and true spiritual freedom.

Hello to you. It’s 8:39 am as I begin to write to you. It’s 21 degrees, with a feels like of 6 outside right now! Definitely winter here! So how are you? Hopefully you have nutritious food, clothing, shelter, clean water, clean air to breathe and love. Unless someone chooses to go without, I think everyone should have those basic things!

So with it being colder for sleeping, I’ve been dreaming a lot. The dreams aren’t always coherent enough to share but this first one is. It’s very symbolic I think of what it’s like to try and exist in this world.

The dream began with an actual flash of text, “What went wrong?” Then the dream progressed to a family living on a farm surrounded by a swamp populated with large crocodiles (this came from a video we watched recently of a man filming crocs and his friends telling him to run because they were coming after him) and lions (this came from a recent video of seeing a woman being dragged off by a tiger and mauled nearly to death (killed her mom) at one of those animal safari parks and healthy lion cubs being killed in Sweden).

Well if you didn’t time it right, you couldn’t travel because the reptiles would get too close to the house. I actually had a showdown with two of them through a glass door. Someone had left the house and couldn’t come home because of this situation. I remember watching lions trying to climb over the crocodiles without getting bitten. It was a very uneasy relationship.

The symbolism of the dream holds true to the world we live in especially at the upper echelons it seems. I watch these human beings who claim to be civilized barely cooperating, biting each other, mauling and even complete devouring one another just to keep their “stuff” and their power. There is little compassion or empathy it seems – just doing whatever it takes to survive with little regard to collateral damage.  I haven’t lost hope in them though.  Each day I catch glimpses of the leaders and type of people I think they really want to be – people who make this world better for more than just themselves and their kin.  Progress not perfection!

Then there is this. I searched Google and Bing and found this one article that inspired me to believe we are more than just combatants in this world. This is also a great example of resilience. Today’s Daily Good article really ties into what it takes for a veteran like Brandon Dodson and so many others not to completely lose their shit after serving in the military. Resilience is a word that has figured into my own life on more than one occasion. Just when I thought I was broken beyond repair, the God of my understanding and all the accompanying Earth Angels they could send lifted me back up:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/good-news/walls-raised-for-double-amputees-home-in-vista/ar-AAuJwkw?OCID=ansmsnnews11

Walls raised for double amputee’s home in Vista

The “Walls of Honor” event was organized by the Gary Sinise Foundation, which is building the 3,000-square-foot house for Dodson, who lost both legs in Afghanistan in 2014, and his family.

Too many people overvalue what they are not and undervalue what they are.
Malcolm S. Forbes

http://www.dailygood.org/story/1820/the-gifts-of-imperfection-brene-brown/

Be like the bird that, passing on her flight awhile on boughs too slight, feels them give way beneath her, and yet sings, knowing that she hath wings. –Victor Hugo

The Gifts of Imperfection

–by Brene Brown, syndicated from spiritualityandpractice.com, Jan 16, 2018

Let Go of Who You Think You’re Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are

“Resilience — the ability to overcome adversity — has been a growing topic of study since the early 1970s. In a world plagued by stress and struggle, everyone from psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers to clergy and criminal justice researchers want to why and how some folks are better at bouncing back from hardship than others. We want to understand why some people can cope with stress and trauma in a way that allows them to move forward in their lives, and why other people appear more affected and stuck.

“As I collected and analyzed my data, I recognized that many of the people I interviewed were describing stories of resilience. I heard stories about people cultivating Wholehearted lives despite adversity. I learned about people’s capacities to stay mindful and authentic under great stress and anxiety, and I heard people describe how they were able to transform trauma into Wholehearted thriving.

“It wasn’t difficult to recognize these stories as tales of resilience because I was in graduate school during the heyday of resilience research. I knew these narratives were threaded with what we call protective factors — the things we do, have, and practice that give us the bounce.

“What Makes Up Resilience?

“If you look at the current research, here are five of the most common factors of resilient people:

“1. They are resourceful and have good problem-solving skills.

  1. They are more likely to seek help.
  2. They hold the belief that they can do something that will help them to manage their feelings and to cope.
  3. They have social support available to them.
  4. They are connected with others, such as family or friends.

“Of course, there are more factors, depending on the researchers, but these are the big ones.

“At first, I hoped the patterns that I observed in my research would lead to a very straightforward conclusion — resilience is a core component of Wholeheartedness — just like the other guideposts. But there was something more to what I was hearing. The stories had more in common than just resilience; all of these stories were about spirit.

“According to the people I interviewed, the very foundation of the ‘protective factors’ — the things that made them bouncy — was their spirituality. By spirituality, I’m not talking about religion or theology, but I am talking about a shared and deeply held belief. Based on the interviews, here’s how I define spirituality:

“Spirituality is recognizing and celebrating that we are all inextricably connected to each other by a power greater than all of us, and that our connection to that power and to one another is grounded in love and compassion. Practicing spirituality brings a sense of perspective, meaning, and purpose to our lives.

“Without exception, spirituality — the belief in connection, a power greater than self, and interconnections grounded in love and compassion — emerged as a component of resilience. Most people spoke of God, but not everyone. Some were occasional churchgoers; others were not. Some worshipped at fishing holes; others in temples, mosques, or at home. Some struggled with the idea of religion; others were devout members of organized religions. The one thing that they all had in common was spirituality as the foundation of their resilience.

“From this foundation of spirituality, three other significant patterns emerged as being essential to resilience:

“1. Cultivating hope

  1. Practicing critical awareness
  2. Letting go of numbing and taking the edge off vulnerability, discomfort, and pain”

Syndicated from Spirituality & Health magazine. S&H was founded in 1998 for people seeking holistic health in body, mind, and spirit. It aspires to help guide the journey to self-knowledge, authenticity, and integration. Its articles draw from the wisdom of many traditions and cultures, with an emphasis on sharing spiritual practices, and look to science to help provide a context for the spiritual quest. Read more from Spirituality & Health here.

 

15 Jan 2018 Random things

Hello to you.  It’s 12:12 pm on this overcast and gray Monday.  How are you?  I hope you are well.  My dreams last night were strange.  Part of one dream involved watching Elvis Presley singing Love Me Tender in a small church.  I am thinking that was triggered by a recent headline I read about the mystery out of Graceland about a couple visiting there (Elvis Presley’s home) and the woman disappearing:  http://www.newser.com/story/254063/police-probe-mans-claim-that-wife-died-on-graceland-visit.html – Police Probe Man’s Claim That Wife Died on Graceland Visit Authorities in Tennessee have no record of her body…weird!  I hope they find her.

Elvis Presley Love Me Tender (1956) (Official Video)

 

What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies.
Aristotle

Source is Internet – view through a Kaleidoscope

15 Jan 2018 – missing the sun this morning so I will have to find ways to make my own!

I’m feeling really groggy and sleep today but wanted to stop in and say hello anyways.  We are still adjusting to having two extra dogs in the house at night.   Sleep disruption has been an issue but it’s getting better.  We are supposed to get some “weather” that includes sleet the next couple of days here.  I hope you find something of interest here today – that resonates with you.   I hope you are Loved and are Loving.  Keep a regular exercise routine up with that ball of sun in your chest!

This article from the Daily Good feels like a great one to share on the day we honor Martin Luther King.

http://www.dailygood.org/story/1895/why-the-moral-argument-for-non-violence-matters-kazu-haga/

Why the Moral Argument for Non-Violence Matters

Nonviolence is a powerful and just weapon, which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals. –Martin Luther King, Jr.

Why the Moral Argument for Non-Violence Matters

–by Kazu Haga, syndicated from wagingnonviolence.org, Jan 15, 2018

“Bernard? Oh yeah, he’s great. He was always the principles guy.”

That was what an old Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC, organizer told me when I mentioned that I had been trained by Bernard Lafayette, co-author of the Kingian Nonviolence curriculum and a legend of the civil rights era.

“I was always a strategies guy,” this elder went on to tell me. “I believed in nonviolence as an effective strategy, but Bernard was always talking about nonviolence as a principle.”

I let out a little laugh. In that moment, I was proud to have been trained by “the principles guy.”

When people talk about nonviolence in the context of social change, they’re typically talking about nonviolent organizing, nonviolent direct action, nonviolent civil resistance; arenas where the word “nonviolence” is only an adjective describing the absence of physical violence within a set of tactics and strategies. The philosophy of nonviolence and the moral question of violence are often considered too messy or complicated, even by those who do believe it to be a principle.

The civil rights movement was led largely by leaders who believed in nonviolence as a moral imperative. It was not only the most effective thing, but also the right thing. While Martin Luther King Jr. and his closest allies held to this belief, some other movement leaders — as well as the vast majority of people who mobilized for the movement — only understood nonviolence as a strategy.

Most of the movements I have participated in, even those that had a strict policy of nonviolence, tend to shy away from the moral question — possibly for fear of turning away potential participants.

And I get that. Making the argument that nonviolence should be seen as a way of life is a much harder sell than convincing people that it is the most effective strategy to accomplish a goal. Convincing people to remain nonviolent during a demonstration is a lot easier than convincing people to look at how to practice nonviolence in all areas of our life.

We find ourselves in an urgent moment in history. From climate change to the Trump agenda, we do not have the luxury to wait until tomorrow. We need a movement today. So maybe trying to make the moral argument is not the most strategic thing.

But King taught us that it is never the wrong time to do the right thing. And so, I believe the time is right to make the argument that violence itself is our biggest enemy.

Honoring violence

Making the moral argument for nonviolence does not mean placing a moral judgment on those who use or advocate for violence, especially as a means for self-defense.

As an advocate for nonviolence, I have learned a great deal from the likes of the Black Panther Party, the Zapatistas, the Deacons for Defense and the anarchists in the Spanish Civil War, among others. Their struggles and sacrifices should never be discounted, nor should we ignore the many lessons from their movements.

We should also never judge those who have used violence for self-defense in interpersonal relationships — abusive relationships, robberies, assaults, etc. If people felt like that was their only means of protecting themselves, I only pray that they were okay.

Finally, we need to acknowledge the extreme levels of violence that many people are born into because of systemic injustice. We put people into generations of poverty and invest in a culture of violence, then judge them for reacting with violence? As inarticulate as it may be, even riots are typically a cry for peace from a people who have never had it.

So violence can be an effective tool to protect yourself and others against a threat, and it can be used to express outrage about injustice. There is great value in both.

Yet violence is also limited in one very important way, and that is that violence can never create relationships.

Violence can never get you closer to reconciliation, closer to King’s “beloved community,” the reconciled world with justice for all people. And that is perhaps the most significant difference between a principled nonviolent approach and an approach using violence or nonviolence that is strictly strategic. The goals are different.

Resolution vs. reconciliation

In movements that are violent or simply use nonviolent tactics, the goal is victory, where victory is defined as “your” people beating “those” people to win your demands. The victory is over your opponents. But in a principled approach, there is no victory until you’ve won your opponents over.

In a principled nonviolent approach, the goal is always reconciliation and steps toward beloved community. The goal is always to build and strengthen relationships and to bring people and communities together, not separate them. If we are not able to find ways to bring communities together, we will always have separation, violence and injustice.

Even if you are able to achieve short-term gains, if relationships between people were harmed in the conflict and you are further away from each other as a result, then it is not a victory at all. If only your tactics are nonviolent and not your worldview, whatever issue you’re working on may get resolved, but the relationships don’t get repaired.

It was a team of incarcerated Kingian Nonviolence trainers in Soledad Prison that taught me this during a conversation we were having about the difference between conflict resolution and conflict reconciliation.

Conflict resolution is about fixing issues. Conflict reconciliation is about repairing relationships. Resolving an issue is about the mind. It’s about policies, structures, laws — the causes of violence. Reconciling a relationship is about the heart. It’s about the people, the stories, the history — the human impact of violence.

The levels of violence today are so heightened that there will be times when movements will need to use assertive and militant nonviolent tactics to stop the immediate harm and demand change.

As Marshall Rosenberg, the founder of nonviolent communication, says, we need to, “use the minimum amount of force necessary to stop the immediate harm.” And we never think about what the “minimum amount” looks like.

That is the realm of nonviolent strategies and tactics like noncooperation and civil disobedience. Tactics that could stop the construction of a pipeline, pass voter protection laws or even lead to a political revolution.

But if we stop there, the relationships between the communities are still divided, and there could still be fear, mistrust and resentment. If the human relationships are not healed, the conflict will resurface again on some other issue. Any peace gained through political revolution but not a revolution of relationships is short-lived.

Reconciliation is what a principled nonviolent approach demands.

The need for healing

The very nature of violence is unjust. As Rev. James Lawson, one of the lead trainers for the civil rights movement, has said, “Violence has a very simple dynamic. I make you suffer more than I suffer. I make you suffer until you cry uncle.” It is the very idea that we can use force, fear and intimidation to get what we want that is our enemy.

Because violence hurts. Period.

We all know that. We’ve all experienced it — physical, emotional and spiritual. It hurts to get punched, but it hurts more to feel abandoned, alone, ashamed, hopeless, desperate, unworthy, afraid, used. And too often, we are made to feel those things by people in our own families, in our own movements, in our own communities.

Being committed to a principled approach to nonviolence requires us to look at the pain that we carry ourselves, and the pain that we inflict on each other within our communities. It is easy to point the finger and say that the violence is “over there.”

I have talked to too many people who shared that the traumas they carry were only re-triggered and made worse by the violence they witnessed within movements. When we say that we are committed to nonviolence, we are not only saying that we want to stop the violence “over there” that “those people” are committing. We also try to work on the ways we ourselves perpetuate harm as a result of our own unhealed traumas. We are working to heal our own selves as much as anyone we perceive as our enemies. We are working to change how we relate to each other in own communities as much as we are working to change any policy.

Whether you live in an impoverished community or work in law enforcement where your job is to dehumanize people all day, we are not a healthy society. It hurts to witness violence, it hurts to experience violence, and it hurts to inflict violence. Each causes trauma.

Yes, we need to fight. But only so that we can create spaces to heal and to build.

Beloved community

“We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny,” King wrote in his Letter from a Birmingham Jail. “Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.”

This universal truth comes out in many cultures and traditions throughout the world. The aboriginal peoples in Australia teach us, “If you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”

That is the vision of beloved community. A world where we acknowledge our interdependence — our “inter-being,” as Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh says.

My liberation is bound up in yours. That is a beautiful concept, and a popular quote in many progressive circles. But to what extent do we really believe it? Is our liberation bound up with the liberation of some and not others? How about people who voted for Donald Trump or people who have hurt us personally? Who draws that line? Do some people fall out of the “network of mutuality” that King talked about?

What does it look like to work together to “liberate” those who commit harm? What does it mean to acknowledge that being oppressed hurts, but being an oppressor also destroys your soul? The privileges of being an oppressor doesn’t take away the violence that gets internalized when you hurt someone.

Beloved community is not about loving the people who are easy to love. It is about cultivating “agape” — a Greek word for unconditional love for all of humanity, including those who are difficult to love.

King said that the civil rights movement was a movement for the bodies of black folks and the souls of white folks. He acknowledged that being a white supremacist destroys your soul. To have so much judgment and hatred in your heart is an act of violence you do to yourself, and part of the goal of the movement was to help them. To bring them back into the network of mutuality and to remind them that they are part of beloved community.

Because our liberation depends on it.

Faith in people

The core of the theory of nonviolence for me has become an unwavering faith in the nature of humanity. That at our core, we are a species that wants to live in peace and wants to be in service and relationship; that we have the resiliency to heal no matter how hurt we are, and we have the ability to transform no matter how much harm we’ve caused.

We get asked all the time in our workshops, “Well, isn’t violence just part of human nature?” And I used to struggle responding to it, because it was hard to argue. It has always been part of our history.

Then several years ago, I met Paul Chappell, a graduate of West Point turned peace activist. During his presentation at a conference, he said that every study that has ever been conducted shows that violence is traumatic. It can cause PTSD, depression, anxiety and permanent damage to our brain. And yet not a single person has ever been traumatized by an act of love.

He then asked, “If violence is part of our nature, then why does it short-circuit our brain?” Shouldn’t we be able to engage in it and not have it cause permanent damage?

That to him was evidence that violence isn’t in our nature, that at the core of human nature are the things that fulfill us: love, joy, community, peace.

And that is what we need today: a determined and dogged belief in the goodness of people. We need the fierce tactics of nonviolence to stop the immediate harm, and the principles of nonviolence to transform the pain. Without one or the other, we are always going to be spinning our wheels, fighting the next injustice or addressing the next hurt.

I’ve been very privileged in my life. I’ve gotten to see so many people transformed from the most violent circumstances, that it might be easier for me to have faith in people. It is the greatest honor being able to work with incarcerated communities. Everyday, I get to learn from people who have survived so much violence and in many cases have inflicted so much harm, yet have transformed to become some of the greatest peacemakers I’ve ever met. It gives me faith in the resiliency of people and in the core of human nature.

And if I can have faith in their core and their ability to transform, why not the prison guards? Why not the politician who passed the laws that filled the prison? Or the corporate lobbyist who pushed for that legislation? Or the conservative voter who put those lawmakers into office?

It may take seven generations, but if we are not working for a world that works for all of us, then what exactly are we working for? If we are working to change laws and policies, but the hearts and minds of the people are still corrupt and we still see each other as exactly that — “others” — will we ever know peace?

We are in need of a truly nonviolent revolution, not just of systems and policies, but also of worldviews and relationships. We need to understand that people are never the enemy, that violence and injustice itself is what we need to defeat, and that the goal of every conflict must be reconciliation.

Each conflict we face has to be seen as an opportunity to strengthen understanding between members of a human family that have grown so far apart that we have forgotten our dependence on each other.

That is why we need a principled nonviolent approach to society’s ills. Because it is not just laws and systems that have poisoned us. It is a worldview that has made us forget that our liberation is bound up in the liberation of all people.

And only a holistic nonviolent approach — one that involves both strategies and principles — can muster the force to stop injustice in its tracks while bringing communities towards reconciliation.

Syndicated from Waging Non-Violence, a source for original news and analysis about struggles for justice and peace around the globe.Kazu Haga is a Kingian Nonviolence trainer based in Oakland, California. Born in Japan, he has been involved in many social change movements since he was 17. He conducts regular trainings with youth, incarcerated populations and activists. He is the founder and coordinator of East Point Peace Academy, and is on the board of Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice, PeaceWorkers and the OneLife Institute.

Other headlines that caught my eye:

http://www.khou.com/news/nation-world/cvs-bans-photo-manipulation-for-store-beauty-brands-will-place-alert-label-on-others/508135376

CVS bans photo manipulation for store beauty brands, will place alert label on others

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-autoshow-detroit-ford-motor/ford-plans-11-billion-investment-40-electrified-vehicles-by-2022-idUSKBN1F30YZ

Ford plans $11 billion investment, 40 electrified vehicles by 2022

http://www.newsweek.com/fossil-reveals-feathered-dinosaur-shimmered-rainbow-781516

Feathered Dinosaur Shimmered Like a Rainbow, Fossil Reveals

14 Jan 2018 drawing I did yesterday thinking about what is in the in-between spaces. What can travel and or exist in the dark spaces in between?

Very interesting videos we watched this morning from Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell

Is Reality Real? The Simulation Argument *I’ve wondered about this a lot lately!

How Bacteria Rule Over Your Body – The Microbiome *Who is in charge of our bodies really?!

 

 

 

14 Jan 2018 Emergence (Drawing) and What exactly is Emergence? (Peggy Holman Cultivating leadership for complex times)

Hello,  how are you?  Keeping it short.  I did a scan of the headlines and even in places I was hoping to find something positive…nope!  Thankfully a couple of WordPress blogs I read this morning did have positive messages; here are links if you wish to check them out!

https://empoweredeverydayblog.wordpress.com/2018/01/14/promise-me/

https://patrickrealstories.wordpress.com/2018/01/14/patrick-concept-of-blessings-simple-way-to-bless-others/

The final drawing I did yesterday was one I really liked and may even put to canvas at some point.  What came to mind about it was the word Emergence.  What is the definition of this word?  It’s not an easy word to define I found out!  I found Peggy Holman’s method understandable for someone like me and a couple of videos on the different spectrums of understanding.  The whole subject has lit a spark of “wow! that’s fascinating!” in my brain!

When  I was thinking of it after doing my drawing, I was thinking of shining even when we don’t want to – emerging out of our personal darkness and shining.  Quite simple compared to what I’ve watched and read this morning!

13 Jan 2018 – I really liked this drawing after I was done. The word Emergence came looking at it. It is so hard sometimes to emerge from where we are hiding, our personal darkness in order to share ourselves with others and shine our personal light in the world. Kind of a personal hokey pokey perhaps?! “One foot in, one foot out….”

http://peggyholman.com/papers/engaging-emergence/engaging-emergence-table-of-contents/part-i-the-nature-of-emergence/chapter-1-what-is-emergence/

Chapter 1. What Is Emergence?

If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.

—Carl Sagan, Cosmos

For most of us, the notion of emergence is tough to grasp because the concept is just entering our consciousness. When something new arises, we have no simple, shorthand language for it. The words we try seem like jargon. So we stumble with words, images, and analogies to communicate this whiff in the air that we can barely smell. We know it exists because something does not fit easily into what we already know.

Emergence disrupts, creates dissonance. We make sense of the disturbances that emergence creates partially through developing language that helps us to tease out useful distinctions. As the vocabulary to describe what is emerging becomes more familiar, our understanding increases. For example, disturbance, disruption, and dissonance are part of the language of engaging emergence. These terms are cousins, and I often use them interchangeably. Disruption is the most general of the three words. If something involves an emotional nuance, chances are that I call the disruption a disturbance. When conflict is involved or the disruption is particularly grating, with a lack of agreement or harmony, I will likely refer to its dissonance.

This chapter helps build a vocabulary we can all use by defining emergence. The chapter also provides a brief history of how our understanding of emergence has evolved. It offers some distinctions between strong and weak emergence and describes essential characteristics of emergence—what it looks like and how it behaves. The chapter ends by reflecting on the challenge of learning how to engage emergence.

Defining Emergence

In the preface, I defined emergence as simply as possible: order arising out of chaos. A more nuanced definition is higher-order complexity arising out of chaos in which novel, coherent structures coalesce through interactions among the diverse entities of a system. Emergence occurs when these interactions disrupt, causing the system to differentiate and ultimately coalesce into something novel.

Key elements of this definition are chaos and novelty. Chaos is random interactions among different entities in a given context. Think of people at a cocktail party. Chaos contains no clear patterns or rules of interaction. Make that a cocktail party in which no single culture prevails, so that no one is sure how close to stand to others, whether to make eye contact, or whether to use first or last names. Emergent order arises when a novel, more complex system forms. It often happens in an unexpected, almost magical leap. The cocktail party is actually a surprise party, and everyone knows where to hide and when to sing “Happy Birthday.”

Emergence produces novel systems—coherent interactions among entities following basic principles. In his bestseller Emergence, science writer Steven Johnson puts it this way: “Agents residing on one scale start producing behavior that lies one scale above them: ants create colonies; urbanites create neighborhoods; simple pattern-recognition software learns how to recommend new books.”1 Emergence in human systems has produced new technologies, towns, democracy, and some would say consciousness—the capacity for self-reflection.

A Short History of Emergence

If we want to engage emergence, understanding its origins helps. Scientist Peter Corning offers a brilliant essay on emergence.2 He brought a multitude of sources together to describe an evolution in perspectives. I have paraphrased some highlights:

  • Emergence has gone in and out of favor since 1875. According to philosopher David Blitz, the term was coined by the pioneer psychologist G. H. Lewes, who wrote, “[T]here is a co-operation of things of unlike kinds. The emergent is unlike its components . . . and it cannot be reduced to their sum or their difference.” By the 1920s, the ideas of emergence fell into disfavor under the onslaught of analysis. Analysis was seen as the best means to make sense of our world. In recent years, nonlinear mathematical tools have provided the means to model complex, dynamic interactions. This modeling capability has revived interest in emergence—how whole systems evolve.
  • Emergence is intimately tied to studies of evolution. Herbert Spencer, an English philosopher and contemporary of Darwin’s, described emergence as “an inherent, energy-driven trend in evolution toward new levels of organization.” It described the sudden changes in evolution—the move from ocean to land, from ape to human.

Although evolutionary scientists have done much of the work, people from a variety of disciplines have also struggled to explain this common and mysterious experience. What enables an unexpected leap of understanding in a field of study or practice? In 1962, Thomas Kuhn contributed to our understanding by coining the term paradigm shift to describe a tradition-shattering change in the guiding assumptions of a scientific discipline.3

Then the Santa Fe Institute, a leader in defining the frontiers of complex systems research, took the work further. Engagingly told by Mitchell Waldrop in his book Complexity, the story of how the Santa Fe Institute was born reads like a great adventure.4 In the mid-1980s, a hunch brought biologists, cosmologists, physicists, economists, and others to the Los Alamos National Laboratory to explore odd notions about complexity, adaptation, upheavals at the edge of chaos.5 Though their disciplines used different terms, they shared a common experience with this strange form of change. They were no longer alone with their questions. Others were exploring the same edges.

They gave this experience a name: emergent complexity, or emergence for short. While emergence has aspects of the familiar—Mom’s nose, Dad’s eyes—it is its own notion. It isn’t just integrating old ideas with what’s new. It is something more—and different. It is whole systems evolving over time. Single-cell organisms interact, and multicellular creatures emerge. Humans become self-conscious and track their own evolution.

In Emergence, Steven Johnson speaks of how our understanding of emergence has evolved.6 In the initial phase, seekers grappled with ideas of self-organization without language to describe it. Without a coherent frame of reference, the ideas were like a magician’s illusion: our attention was diverted to the familiar while the real action was happening unseen in front of our noses.

As language emerged—complexity, self-organization, complex adaptive systems—a second phase began. These terms focused our attention in new directions. People started coming together across disciplines to understand the nature of these patterns. The Santa Fe Institute was central to this phase.

During the 1990s, we entered a third phase, applied emergence, in which we “stopped analyzing emergence and started creating it.”7 In other words, we could see emergence occurring naturally in phenomena like anthills. And we started working with it—for example, developing software that recognizes music or helps us find mates.

This book is about creating conditions for applied emergence in our social systems. It aims to help us work with the dynamics of emergent complexity so that our intentions are realized as life-serving outcomes.

Distinctions Between Weak and Strong Emergence

Scientists distinguish two forms of emergence: weak and strong emergence. Understanding this distinction clears up some confusion. Predictable patterns of emergent phenomena, such as traffic flows and anthills, are examples of weak emergence. In contrast, strong emergence is experienced as upheaval. When disruptions dramatically change a system’s form, as in revolutions and renaissances, strong emergence has occurred.

Weak emergence describes new properties arising in a system. A baby is wholly unique from its parents, yet is basically predictable in form. In weak emergence, rules or principles act as the authority, providing context for the system to function. In effect, they eliminate the need for someone in charge. Road systems are a simple example.

Strong emergence occurs when a novel form arises that was completely unpredictable. We could not have guessed its properties by understanding what came before. Nor can we trace its roots from its components or their interactions. We see stories on television. Yet we could not have predicted this form of storytelling from books.

As strong emergence occurs, the rules or assumptions that shape a system cease to be reliable. The system becomes chaotic. In our social systems, perhaps the situation is too complex for a traditional hierarchy to address it. Self-organizing responses to emergencies are an example. Such circumstances give emergence its reputation for unnerving leaps of faith.

Yet emergent systems increase order even in the absence of command and central control: useful things happen with no one in charge. Open systems extract information and order out of their environment. They bring coherence to increasingly complex forms. In emergent change processes, setting clear intentions, creating hospitable conditions, and inviting diverse people to connect does the work. Think of it as an extended cocktail party with a purpose.

Characteristics of Emergence

Although the conversation continues, scientists generally agree on these qualities of emergence:

Radical novelty—At each level of complexity, entirely new properties appear (for example, from autocracy—rule by one person with unlimited power—to democracy, where people are the ultimate source of political power)

Coherence—A stable system of interactions (an elephant, a biosphere, an agreement)

Wholeness—Not just the sum of its parts, but also different and irreducible from its parts (humans are more than the composition of lots of cells)

Dynamic—Always in process, continuing to evolve (changes in transportation: walking, horse and buggy, autos, trains, buses, airplanes)

Downward causation—The system shaping the behavior of the parts (roads determine where we drive)

The phrase “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts” captures key aspects of these ideas. Birds flock, sand forms dunes, and individuals create societies. Each of these phrases names a related but distinct system. Each system is composed of, influenced by, but different from its mate: birds and flocks, sand and dunes, individuals and societies.

As with all change, emergence occurs when disruptions shape the interactions. In emergence, coherence breaks apart; differences surface and re-form in a novel system. The two most frequently cited dynamics:

No one is in charge—No conductor is orchestrating orderly activity (ecosystems, economic systems, activity in a city).

Simple rules engender complex behavior—Randomness becomes coherent as individuals, each following a few basic principles or assumptions, interact with their neighbors (birds flock; traffic flows).

Twelve-step programs characterize these ideas at work. Most participants are fiercely independent people who are not there to follow someone in authority. Yet with the guidance offered through 12 statements, these programs are highly complex, worldwide organizations that have influenced the lives of millions.

No doubt the simplicity of these two dynamics may leave many senior executives and government agency heads skeptical. No one is in charge? Not likely. Isn’t it interesting that the word order is a term for issuing instructions? What happens when orders come from the top? If they disrupt existing functions of the organization, sometimes it moves in novel and useful directions. And sometimes the orders produce entirely unexpected—emergent—outcomes that arise from within the system, bearing little resemblance to the orders given.

If managers say, “We’re too complex for simple rules,” chances are they’re confusing complicated and complex. We often make things more complicated than necessary. Filling out a form in a bureaucracy is a common example. Complexity is entirely different. Complexity has elegance. It is, to paraphrase Einstein, as simple as possible but not simpler.

Emergence is an energy-efficient approach to accomplishing complex tasks. Consider the different costs of handling conflict through dialogue versus war. Negotiations among a handful of diplomats can lead to breakthrough agreements for all involved. In contrast, armed conflict involves thousands and generally produces results that work for one party, along with loss of life and property for all involved. Quite a different proposition in time, money, and life!

How Does Novelty Emerge?

Two key dynamics shape how novelty arises—how systems, including us, learn and adapt. Increasingly complex and novel forms emerge from interactions among autonomous, diverse agents, like us, through

  • feedback among neighboring agents, and
  • clustering as like finds like.

Feedback

Systems grow and self-regulate through feedback. Output from one interaction influences the next interaction. We talk to a neighbor, we share some of the discussion with friends, and suddenly everyone in town knows that Sally married Harry.

Disruptions are feedback. They signal potential change. Most of us focus on the symptoms, the visible outcomes of such signals. A fight breaks out, and we concentrate on who is winning and losing. What caused the fight? How else might it be resolved? We ask different questions when we pay attention to what’s behind the feedback.

Feedback opens communication. It connects what’s inside and outside, at the top and bottom, across and within systems. It gives us a chance to notice what is emerging and discern its meaning.

Systems theory uses feedback loops to help us map how interactions influence each other. It names two types of feedback loops: reinforcing and balancing loops.

Perhaps this is how the fight erupted: I speak my mind. It pushes your buttons; you get mad and push back. Even if I hadn’t intended to irritate you, now I’m on the defensive. To protect myself, I attack you. And things escalate. In what is called a reinforcing feedback loop, output reinforces an action in the same general direction—sometimes toward more, sometimes toward less. Reinforcing loops are also called vicious or, when healthy, virtuous cycles.

Another form of feedback occurs through balancing feedback loops. Opposite forces counteract each other. Separation of powers among executive, legislative, and judiciary branches of government illustrates balancing loops. Each keeps the others in check. In healthy systems, those that continually learn and adapt, balancing loops periodically interrupt reinforcing loops, ending their perpetual growth. Without such checks we get global warming, economic meltdowns, and cancer.

Clustering

As we interact, feeding back to each other, like attracts like. Some of us bond around a shared characteristic. For example, we both like the same candidate for office. Over time, small groups with similar interests form. Perhaps parents advocate for a new style of school. With continued interaction, small groups become larger groups. Increasingly complex networks take shape when something binds them together. Parents, teachers, and small businesses unite to create new types of schools. At some point, a complex and stable cluster arises. It has unique properties unlike its individual elements. A national movement for charter schools takes off. Something novel emerges.

Humans are talented at pattern matching—clustering like with like. We even do it unconsciously. We see it indirectly in how towns and cities form. Asian districts exist in San Francisco, New York, and London. All of the auto dealerships are in the same part of town. As maps of the Internet are created, clusters of highly interconnected sites are appearing. We are experiencing emergence in process. Through our increasingly sophisticated technology, we can track complex networks forming. New tools show us the neural networks of the brain, the ecosystems of nature, and social structures in cultures. The ability to see complexity is reinvigorating interest in emergence. We can finally study complex patterns over time and space.

Such tools make complex stories visible. For example, at a 2010 Journalism That Matters conference, a map of Northwest news and information Web sites caught the attention of an executive editor. He noticed the competition in the center of the map. He searched long and hard to locate his organization. A colleague explained that their antiquated technology caused the problem. No doubt, priorities changed when the executive returned to the office.

Learning How to Engage Emergence

The story of emergence is still young. We have struggled with its existence, described some of its properties, and given it a name. We are early in understanding what it means to social systems—organizations, communities, and sectors such as politics, health care, and education. We are just learning how to work with it to support positive changes and deep transformation.

In social systems, emergence can move us toward possibilities that serve enduring needs, intentions, and values. Forms can change, conserving essential truths while bringing forth innovations that weren’t possible before. In journalism, traditional values of accuracy and transparency are making their way into the blogosphere, social network sites, and other emerging media.

Emergence is a process, continual and never-ending. It emphasizes interactions as much as it does the people or elements interacting. Most of us focus on what we can observe—the animal, the project outcome, the object. Emergence involves also paying attention to what is happening—the stranger arriving with different cultural assumptions that ripple through the organization or community.

Emergence is a product of interactions among diverse entities. Since interactions don’t exist in a vacuum, the context also matters. That is why just bringing diverse people together won’t necessarily lead to a promising outcome. Initial conditions set the context. How the invitation is issued, the quality of welcome, the questions posed, the physical space, all influence whether a fight breaks out or warm, unexpected partnerships form.

In truth, working with emergence can be a bit like befriending Kokopelli, a trickster of the ancient Pueblo peoples of the American Southwest, or his Norse counterpart, Loki. Working with mischievous spirits always has some catches.

Back to the Table of Contents

On to Chapter 2. What’s the Catch?

A couple of videos, if you type the word Emergence in to You Tube, there are more:

PHILOSOPHY – Metaphysics: Emergence

Emergence – How Stupid Things Become Smart Together (Kyle and I had to laugh about this)

12 Jan 2018 There are no rules in dreams

 

12 Jan 2018 – Last drawing of the day….brrrr so cold lol! This is me dreaming about energy ships that can stack on top of each other.

12 Jan 2018 – notes of what I was thinking with regards to these stacking energy ships. Inspired by the Keshe Foundation Magrav coil stacks.

Hello to you.  It’s 5:05 pm on this cold Friday afternoon.  I normally don’t post more than once a day,  but wanted to share this “stuff” with you.  What came to me while I was explaining this to Kyle, is that what’s great is there are no rules for me when it comes to dreaming about energy, space travel etc.  I’m not obstructed by the “rules” that come with having degrees in physics, math, astronomy, engineering and all that.  I get to dream.  I get to just imagine.  I have no clue if anything I dream up would “work” in this world.  I don’t care if it all makes sense.  The ideas come from somewhere and I am not going to let rules get in the way of my recording what comes!  I feel a responsibility to just pass on what comes.  May be one of these strange things could eventually be a missing piece for someone who is actually trying to develop such things and knows how to make them work!

I did another drawing earlier in the day and Kyle and I figured out it was my “tv guide” thingy I do for our starting to watch the animated series Voltron LOL!

Voltron: Legendary Defender | Official Trailer [HD] | Netflix

12 Jan 2018 – This drawing ended up having a lot of components of the first episode of the Netflix animated series Voltron. When I looked up 1429 a lot of things came up – Joan of Arc and it being the radio frequency.   What’s funny is we got to about 14 min and 29 seconds of watching the first episode of Voltron too LOL. 

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/joan-of-arc-relieves-orleans

1429

Joan of Arc relieves Orleans

During the Hundred Years’ War, the 17-year-old French peasant Joan of Arc leads a French force in relieving the city of Orleans, besieged by the English since October.

At the age of 16, “voices” of Christian saints told Joan to aid Charles, the French dauphin, in gaining the French throne and expelling the English from France. Convinced of the validity of her divine mission, Charles furnished Joan with a small force of troops. She led her troops to Orleans, and on April 29, as a French sortie distracted the English troops on the west side of the city, Joan entered unopposed by its eastern gate. Bringing needed supplies and troops into the besieged city, she also inspired the French to a passionate resistance and through the next week led the charge during a number of skirmishes and battles. On one occasion, she was even hit by an arrow, but after dressing her wounds she returned to the battle. On May 8, the siege of Orleans was broken, and the English retreated.

During the next five weeks, Joan led French forces into a number of stunning victories over the English, and Reims, the traditional city of coronation, was captured in July. Later that month, Charles VII was crowned king of France, with Joan of Arc kneeling at his feet.

In May 1430, while leading another military expedition against the English occupiers of France, Bourguignon soldiers captured Joan and sold her to the English, who tried her for heresy. She was tried as a heretic and witch, convicted, and on May 30, 1431, burned at the stake at Rouen. In 1920, Joan of Arc, already one of the great heroes of French history, was recognized as a Christian saint by the Roman Catholic Church.

http://www.fordyce.org/scanning/scanning_info/spectrum.htm this is interesting to me.  When the numbers 1429 came up in the drawing, I thought of sound frequencies, sonar, echo’s, trying to locate someone or something.  I thought of the weird whale-like/musical sounds being recorded around the world.  It also brought back fond memories of me being a teenager and using my blue am/fm radio to try and tune in to stations in London – the BBC!  This was during a time when I was heavy into my fandom of David Bowie and other European artists:

The Radio Spectrum

This is an approximate look, to help in searching frequencies on a scanner or shortwave radio. Just be aware, having the right frequency may not be enough, in tuning to a certain frequency. The time of day, atmospheric conditions, location, mode you’re in (AM, SSB, Narrowband FM, Wideband FM, etc.), and your equipment, are also equally important. You’ll find most transmissions are broadcasted in Narrow- band FM. Some main exceptions are shortwave (AM & SSB), commercial AM radio (AM), commercial FM radio (Wideband FM), television (Wideband FM), citizens band radio (AM & SSB), aeronautical communications (mostly AM), and some military VHF/UHF (Wideband FM). Most all scanners will pick a default mode for you, depending on what frequency band you are in. But many scanners also let you manually switch between modes (AM, FM, etc.) and frequency search spacing (5 khz, 12.5 khz, etc.) if the default modes are not correct. Happy Listening!!!

FREQUENCY                    USES/SERVICES
(in Megahertz unless
otherwise indicated)


10 - 150 khz                Military/government, submarine communications
(.01 - .15 MHz)

150 - 535 khz               Longwave Band, beacons, foreign broadcasts, maritime.
(.15 - .535 MHz)

535 - 1700 khz              Your standard AM radio dial.
(.535 - 1.7 MHz)

1.7 - 30                    Shortwave/High Frequency Band.  Broadcasting, two-way 
                            government, military and commercial communications, 
                            amateur radio, CB radio (approx. 27 MHz), others.
                            
                               Shortwave
                               Approx. Range          Meter Band
	                           1.8 - 2.0                  160*
	                           2.3 - 2.495                120
	                           3.2 - 3.4                  90
	                           3.5 - 4.0                  80*
	                           3.9 - 4.0                  75
	                           4.75 - 5.06                60
	                           5.9 - 6.2                  49
	                           7.0 - 7.3                  40*
	                           7.1 - 7.35                 41
	                           9.4 - 9.9                  31
	                           10.1 - 10.15               30*
	                           11.6 - 12.1                25
	                           13.57 - 13.87              22
	                           14.0 - 14.35               20*
	                           15.1 - 15.8                19
	                           18.068 - 18.168            17*
	                           17.48 - 17.9               16
	                           18.9 - 19.02               15
	                           21.0 - 21.45               15*
	                           21.45 - 21.75              13
	                           24.89 - 24.99              12*
	                           25.6 - 26.1                11
	                           28.0 - 29.7                10*
	                           
	(In general, the lower shortwave frequencies  are received 
	better during the night, while higher frequencies are received better during the 
	day.  There are also some amateur radio bands between many of these 
	shortwave bands(*).  Consult a shortwave guide for more detailed information.)

30 - 50                     Very High Frequency Band.  Government, business, 
                            walkie-talkies.  Also, cordless phones and 'baby monitors' 
                            found about 46 - 49 MHz.

50 - 54                    	Amateur radio 6 meter band.

54 - 72                    	TV Channels 2-4.
                           	
	                        Channel 2 Audio (Wideband FM) 59.75
                           	Channel 3 Audio (Wideband FM) 65.75
                           	Channel 4 Audio (Wideband FM) 71.75

72 - 76                    	Manufacturing, remote control, eavesdropping bugs, etc.

76 - 88                    	TV Channels 5-6.

                           	Channel 5 Audio (Wideband FM) 81.75
                           	Channel 6 Audio (Wideband FM) 87.75

88 - 108                   	Your standard FM radio dial.

108 - 136                  	Aeronautical communications (AM).

136 - 138                  	Satellites.

138 - 144                  	Military communications.

144 - 148                  	Amateur radio 2 meter band.

148 - 150.8                	Military use.

150.8 - 174                	Business, highway, law enforcement, government weather, 
                            maritime.

174 - 216                  	TV Channels 7-13.

                           	Channel 7 Audio (Wideband FM) 179.75
                           	Channel 8 Audio (Wideband FM) 185.75
                           	Channel 9 Audio (Wideband FM) 191.75
                           	Channel 10 Audio (Wideband FM) 197.75
                           	Channel 11 Audio (Wideband FM) 203.75
                           	Channel 12 Audio (Wideband FM) 209.75
                           	Channel 13 Audio (Wideband FM) 215.75

216 - 220                  	Maritime and aeronautical.

220 - 222                  	Land mobile communications.

222 - 225                  	Amateur radio.

225 - 400                  	Military aviation and space.

400 - 406                  	Military and government.

406 - 420                  	U.S. Government.

420 - 450                  	Amateur radio.

450 - 470                  	Ultra High Frequency Band.  Business, industry, military, 
                            fire, local government.

470 - 512                  	TV Channels 14-20, shared with law enforcement.

512 - 825                 	TV Channels 21-69, others.

825 - 849                  	Cellular telephones (receivers/handsets).

849 - 851                  	Aeronautical telephones (ground-based towers).

851 - 866                  	Business, public safety, trunked systems.

866 - 869                  	Public safety, law enforcement, trunked systems.

869 - 894                  	Cellular telephones (towers).

                            Note: Even though listening to cellular telephone calls 
                            is technically illegal in the United States, one will 
                            usually do better listening to calls on the tower frequencies, 
                            as opposed to the handset frequencies.  This is because most 
                            cellular phones transmit less than one-watt of output.  So 
                            unless the cellular phone is very close to you, you will have 
                            much more luck scanning the more powerful towers, which 
                            transmit/receive for each cell site.

894 - 896                  	Aeronautical telephones (handsets).

                            Note: In scanning airplane telephones, you will usually do 
                            better listening to the handset frequencies, instead of the 
                            tower frequencies, unless you are very near a ground 
                            transmitter. But, in any event, call traffic heard on handset 
                            frequencies is very scant.

896 - 901                  	Private land mobile units.

902 - 928                  	Land mobile, amateur radio, personal communication units, 
                            cordless telephones.

928 - 932                  	Radio paging.

935 - 940                  	Business radio.

941 - 944                  	Government and non-government fixed services.

944 - 952                  	Broadcasters' studio-to-transmitter links.

952 - 960                  	Private fixed services, paging.

960 - 1240                 	Aeronautical navigation.

1240 - 1300                	Amateur radio.

1300 - 1350               	Aeronautical navigation.

1350 - 1400                	Radio location.

1400 - 1427                	Radio astronomy.

1427 - 1429                	Point-to-point, mobile, space.

1429 - 1660.5              	Various satellite transmission uses.

1660.5 - 1668.4            	Radio astronomy.

1668.4 - 1700              	Meteorological aids.

1700 - 1850                	Meteorological satellites, U.S. Government.

1850 - 1990                	Fixed point-to-point, microwave.

1990 - 2110                	Broadcast studio-to-transmitter links.

Strange Trumpet Sounds In The Sky (2016-2017)  – not sure what to make of this.  What came to mind is like someone placing a call to an entire planet.  It sounds like whales to me – like sonar or echo location.  Very interesting.

Published on Mar 13, 2017

All over the world, people are recording extremely loud sounds coming from the sky. In many instances, these distinctive noises, sound like someone is blowing a trumpet. How are we supposed to interpret these “apocalyptic” sounds? Should we be concerned? What is very clear, is that this is truly , a global phenomenon.

12 Jan 2018 Time Travelers (chalk drawing) and How to Overcome Stress by Seeing Other People’s Joy (http://www.dailygood.org)

11 Jan 2018 – it’s been very cold and windy here the past couple of days so I haven’t been out chalk drawing as much. The sun is out but it’s not supposed to break 40 degrees today!

Hello to you.  It’s 9:01 am as I write to you.  The sun is shining out back but I know it’s still very cold LOL!  We are watching the in-laws dogs Henry and Suzie….last night was as the dogs say…RUFF!  We were up at midnight cleaning up poop and watching You tube Nuke’s Top 5 Lists lool!  There is always an adjustment period when combining packs!

My prayers go out to all those in California and all other parts of the world today.   Whether you are trying to survive the elements of Mother Nature or those of Humankind’s making, I hope you have what you need to get through it.  I hope you know you aren’t alone in this world even if often it may seem like it.  I decided to visit one of my favorite websites for positive stories and found this one.  I hope something in it will resonate in your heart today.

Learn to make the mediator between what you think and what you do be your heart.  If you feel your heart sink below center at the prospect of a thought or an action, chances are whatever it is isn’t the right thing for you!

“If it ain’t light, it ain’t right!” – Carol Lee

 

If you carry joy in your heart, you can heal every moment. –Carlos Santana

http://www.dailygood.org/story/1725/how-to-overcome-stress-by-seeing-other-people-s-joy-kelly-mcgonigal/

How to Overcome Stress by Seeing Other People’s Joy

–by Kelly McGonigal , syndicated from Greater Good, Nov 21, 2017

 If you’re feeling stressed or overwhelmed, don’t cut yourself off from other people, says Kelly McGonigal. Instead, double down on your capacity for connection.

One evening when I walked into a classroom to teach my Science of Stress course, I found a newspaper waiting for me on the lectern. A student had brought in an article called “Stress: It’s Contagious.” The report claimed that stress is “as contagious as any airborne pathogen” and compared its toxicity to secondhand smoke.

As an example, the news story described a study showing that participants had an empathic physiological stress response when they observed another person struggling. One of the researchers commented, “It was surprising how easily the stress was transmitted.”

As someone who studies both stress and empathy, I get asked about this research a lot. Does it mean that empathy is a liability, increasing your risk of exhaustion, depression, or burnout? If you are highly empathic, are you doomed to become a reservoir for other people’s pain and suffering?

One solution is to create stronger emotional barriers—to put on a psychological Hazmat suit to protect against the stress and suffering you don’t want to catch. I’ve seen this approach adopted by many people in the helping professions, including health care, social work, and teaching.

If you are feeling similarly overwhelmed by how affected you are by the emotions of others, I’d like to offer another possibility for preserving your well-being: Double down on your capacity for empathy. Instead of trying to become immune to other people’s stress, increase your susceptibility to catch other people’s joy.

The benefits of positive empathy

While modern psychological science has largely focused on empathy for negative states, a new field of research dubbed “positive empathy” shows that it is also possible to catch happiness.

You might have seen studies showing that seeing other people in pain can activate the pain system in your own brain. It turns out your brain will also resonate with positive emotions. For example, when you witness other’s good fortune, it can activate the brain’s reward system. Moreover, this kind of contagious happiness can be an important source of well-being. The tendency to experience positive empathy is linked to greater life satisfaction, peace of mind, and happiness. It is also associated with greater trust, support, and satisfaction in close relationships.

Those around you may benefit from your empathic joy, as well. One study examined the experience of empathic joy in teachers in fourteen different U.S. states. The teachers who had more frequent experiences of positive empathy toward their students felt more connected to them. This positive attitude led to more positive interactions with students, as observed by classroom evaluators, and higher academic achievement by their students.

Importantly, positive empathy doesn’t just make you feel good; it can also inspire you to do good. The tendency to feel empathic joy is associated with a stronger desire to help others thrive, and a greater willingness to take action to do so. Positive empathy also enhances the warm glow you feel from helping others—making compassion much more sustainable.

Search for small moments of joy

Joy is a big-sounding word, and so we tend to look for classic expressions of “big” joy—huge smiles, exclamations of delight, hugs and cheers. The kind of joy associated with winning the lottery and marriage proposals.

Yet other forms of joy exist all around us. As you begin to look for joy, you will notice more and more of them. There is the joy of pleasures, simple or sublime, such as enjoying a delicious meal, listening to music, or savoring how it feels to hold a baby in your arms. There is the joy of purpose, and how it feels to contribute, work hard, learn, and grow. There is the joy of being connected to something bigger than yourself, be it nature, family, or faith. There is the joy of wonder—being curious, experiencing new things, and feeling awe or surprise.

There is the joy of being acknowledged and appreciated by others—sensing what you have to offer, and knowing that you matter. There is the joy of being your best self—how good it feels to use your strengths in service of something you care about, or to express your most deeply held values. There is the joy of having your needs met—being helped, listened to, or held in a comforting embrace. There is the joy of laughter, and especially shared laughter, and especially shared laughter when everything seems to be falling apart.

These are just a few of the possible joys you can witness. When you keep your eyes open for them, you learn a lot about how much possibility there is for joy for ordinary moments, and even difficult circumstances.

Ultimately, this is how I think of empathic joy: as a resource that allows you to stay engaged with life not just when things go well, but also when they are difficult. It’s not just a practice of celebrating and amplifying the good; it also allows us to sustain hope when we face the reality of suffering unrelieved and needs yet unmet.

How to catch joy

What if right now, your empathy radar seems tuned in only to stress, unable to resonate with other people’s happiness? Maybe you even feel the opposite of contagious joy: envy at other people’s success, isolated by others’ happiness, reminded by their good fortune of what you long for, or lack.

If so, you aren’t alone. Philosophers and psychologists have observed that, for many people, empathy for negative emotions is more instinctive than for positive states.

Fortunately, you don’t have to rely only on instincts; empathic joy can be cultivated. In Buddhist psychology, empathic joy is considered one of the four brahmavihāras (sublime attitudes), alongside equanimity, loving kindness, and compassion. Like other mindsets, empathic joy can be deliberately trained as a way to deepen your wisdom and well-being. With practice, you can strengthen your capacity to notice, resonate with, and celebrate the happiness of others.

Here are five of my favorite everyday practices for catching joy. As you strengthen your intention to notice joy, you will surely discover your own favorite ways to witness and share in the happiness of others.

1. Watch a child or animal play. Delight in their joy, energy, and wonder. Let yourself smile or laugh as their playfulness awakens a similar spirit in you.

2. Watch an athletic, artistic, or other kind of competition without taking sides. Appreciate the effort, skill, or artistry of all competitors—and celebrate the joy of whoever wins. Feel glad for their success, and watch how they celebrate it with others. See if you can extend your empathic joy to how they share the moment with friends, family, coaches, or teammates.

3. Help someone else celebrate their happiness. If someone shares good news, ask them to tell you more, and listen whole-heartedly. If you become aware of an accomplishment or milestone in a person’s life, write them a congratulatory email or Facebook post. Go beyond “pro forma” congratulations and really feel the joy of helping someone savor something positive.

4. Witness the good in others. Set the goal to notice when others display character strengths like kindness, honesty, courage, or perseverance. Take joy in seeing the good. Feel heart-glad about what you observe. Let yourself feel inspired by their actions to do good yourself.

5. Let someone else do something nice for you. This might not seem like a practice of empathic joy, but it becomes one when you begin to pay attention to how happy it makes the other person. Sometimes our own discomfort with receiving kindness, or fear of being a burden to others, gets in the way of seeing that joy.

As Pema Chodron writes in The Places that Scare You:

“Rejoicing in ordinary things is not sentimental or trite. It actually takes guts. Each time we drop our complaints and allow everyday good fortune to inspire us, we enter the warrior’s world. We can do this even at the most difficult moments. Everything we see, hear, taste, and smell has the power to strengthen and uplift us.”

From this point of view, it becomes possible to open your heart to what can feel, at first, like a vulnerability. To let your natural capacity for empathy connect you to both the pain and joy of others, and to trust that this capacity is a blessing, not a liability.


This article is syndicated from Greater Good, the online magazine of the Greater Good Science Center (GGSC). Based at UC Berkeley, the GGSC studies the psychology, sociology, and neuroscience of well-being, and teaches skills that foster a thriving, resilient, and compassionate society. Author Kelly McGonigal, PhD, is a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University, and a leading expert in the new field of “science-help.” She is the author of The Willpower Instinct and The Upside of Stress.

Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.
Lao Tzu

The universe is change; our life is what our thoughts make it
Marcus Aurelius

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow.
Albert Einstein

11 Jan 2018 Dream about ice dimension and increase in unexplained phenomenon being recorded

Dream about riding a special automated flying bicycle through woods. Then it was winter. There was thawing, warmth and city life things going on. As I sat by a frozen lakes edge that was melting, I saw thin layer of clear ice suspended in the sky. I poked it with a stick and actually broke through it like a dimensional hole. When I walked through the hole I made, the other side was completely frozen! There was no sun, no thawing, just endless and solid ice! The “thawing” city was an illusion.

*This is probably just my mind trying to understand the weather lately. I was reading from Walden again which for some reason tends to be a trigger or key to nature themed dreams for me.

10 Jan 2018 Jackie Wygant random thoughts drawing Alvarado TX

I did one of my random drawings yesterday afternoon. It appears to be yet another “tv guide” for this video we would watch this morning while eating breakfast!

5 UNEXPLAINED MYSTERIES in the Sky Caught on Camera

Nuke’s Top 5

Published on Jun 9, 2017

Top 5 unexplained mysteries and strange phenomenon in the sky ! Very weird and unexplainable events and sightings witnessed by REAL people and caught on camera.

I have a theory about why so many more unexplained things are being recorded or are happening these days.  It’s obvious part of it is due to better technology that is able to actually record things we were previously incapable of recording.  I suspect something else:  Wifi or ambient energy charged particles.  What are we “feeding” with the plethora of energy waves we are making more and more of each day?  Are we making pathways….food for tears in reality and food for previously unseen travelers or residual and intelligent hauntings?  Who needs to suck on batteries when you have cell phones and so much more to feed on!  Ghost hunters know about drained batteries.  Kyle and I have experienced on more than one occasion having batteries to devices be completely drained.   It takes energy to “manifest” in reality and we are generating oodles of it!  Who are what are we allowing access to our realities?

Bizarre I know, but that’s just what has come to mind about this lately.  There are so many more ambient energy waves than their used to be just floating all around us.  Are they charging the particles they encounter?  I’ve come to believe we are living in an “energy soup” and everyone and everything that has come before us and is with us now leaves parts of themselves in the atmosphere we all eat, drink and breathe – dander, hair, skin cells, pollen….dust.   Literally everything is energy.  Just a thought.

Strange and unexplainable things have been happening for a very long time.  I have a whole disk of orb pictures I took when I lived in Colorado many years ago.  Some were just dust particles illuminated by the flash, some were tiny bugs captured by light in plants and some I can’t explain.  What’s the most energy efficient shape in which to travel…probably a circle like an orb.  Our technological capabilities have vastly improved from those times.  The energetic “noise” we make now with all these gadgets is much more so than in ages past.

This is a picture I took of May back in 2001 when we lived in base housing at Peterson AFB CO. She seems to be looking at an orb of “something” on the ceiling right above her. Was it a bug? Dust? Something else?

The other thought that comes to mind with regards to the possibility of extraterrestrial visitors, is that they have always been here!  We are now just getting more capable technologies that actually allow us to see them.  If I were an alien trying to make contact with what could be perceived as a very hostile species (humans) I wouldn’t land on the White House front lawn!   I would use stealth technologies and diversionary tactics so there would always be a question as to what was actually being seen.  I guess I get my notes from Gene Roddenberry’s Prime Directive in Star Trek:

Prime Directive. In the fictional universe of Star Trek, the Prime Directive is a guiding principle of the United Federation of Planets prohibiting the protagonists from interfering with the internal development of alien civilizations. The Prime Directive has been used in five of the six Star Trek-based series.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime_Directive

10 Jan 2018 Chalk drawings, Memory Wire and Urban Sprawl

9 Jan 2018- First outdoor chalk drawing yesterday. This almost has an anime feel to it. I was thinking of a spiritual journey to the sun.

9 Jan 2018 – My first Memory Wire bracelet. I decided to try it instead of stretchy cord and I really like it. As I made it I was thinking about the journey of existence. There is Blood, Worlds colliding, Creation, Chakras, Rainbows…all sorts of stuff going on.  The bracelet is very comfortable to wear.  Many years ago my Mom gave me a Memory Wire bead bracelet she had a friend make for me.  Wearing it all makes me feel like Wonder Woman and her Lasso of Truth lol.  Now I have one for each wrist!

9 Jan 2018 – last drawing of the day. Very spiritual feeling to it. More than just a cross.

Hello to you.  It’s Wednesday morning, 7:59 am as I begin to write to you.  I’m sharing some of my creations from yesterday.  Since I’ve nearly maxed out my picture space here again and haven’t decided whether or not I want to buy a professional account, it’s always a nail-biter to see if all I want to share with you will even load up!  Today was a success!

Last night was interesting.  Around 5:59 pm we heard two loud booms that scared us and the dogs.  It sounded like bombs going off.  There was discussion on Next Door (neighborhood internet page) but no definitive answers.  It’s kind of like when we had the 4.0 earthquake a couple of years ago now.  You can’t prepare yourself for those types of sounds and feelings!  Hopefully it wasn’t anything bad.

Our little town is growing much faster than I think anyone thought it would.  Things that used to be o.k. aren’t o.k. anymore in the noise department with more people living in the city proper.  The gap between the folks living on the outer edge of our town and those of us living within it city limits is closing.  A phenomenon I’ve explored here before about this is called Urban Sprawl.  What happens is people will move away from large cities to get away from the chaos and then they tell two friends and they tell two friends and before you know it, they are right in the same situation they left!  When people from large cities move to small ones, they want all the amenities they had but also want peace and quiet….no traffic.  It doesn’t work that way.  Where you go, there you are….I give you Urban Sprawl!

http://www.everythingconnects.org/urban-sprawl.html

Urban sprawl refers to the expansion of poorly planned, low-density, auto-dependent development, which spreads out over large amounts of land, putting long distances between homes, stores, and work and creating a high segregation between residential and commercial uses with harmful impacts on the people living in these areas and the ecosystems and wildlife that have been displaced. Although some would argue that urban sprawl has its benefits, such as creating local economic growth, urban sprawl has many negative consequences for residents and the environment, such as higher water and air pollution, increased traffic fatalities and jams, loss of agricultural capacity, increased car dependency, higher taxes, increased runoff into rivers and lakes, harmful effects on human health, including higher rates of obesity, high blood pressure, hypertension and chronic diseases, increased flooding, decrease in social capital and loss of natural habitats, wildlife and open space. In its path, urban sprawl consumes immeasurable acres of forests, farmland, woodlands and wetlands and in its wake, leaves vacant storefronts, boarded up houses, closed businesses, abandoned and usually contaminated industrial sites, and traffic congestion, which can stretch miles from urban centers and is creating a hidden debt of unfunded infrastructure and services, urban decay, social dysfunction, and environmental degradation.

America’s Biggest Problem   –  well worth spending 14 minutes to watch this!

Published on Jul 20, 2015

Watch the new video, Agoraphobic Nation: Sprawl and Culture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DH60a…
Most of the problems that we face today in the United States, whether they are cultural, economic, social or environmental are rooted in poor urban design and planning. Due to America’s unique experience of economic growth during the 20th century, this has become the most underrated issue in the United States that most people don’t know about. People react to their immediate environment and don’t see the big picture unless they can step outside and view themselves. It’s important to recognize a problem in order to have the capacity to change it.
Some points at the end were inspired by a lecture by Andres Duany: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMvwHDFVpCE

9 Jan 2018 Sum of the One

8 Jan 2018 My outdoor chalk drawing yesterday. The phrase “Sum of One” came to mind thinking of how what is done to one is done to all of us.

Hello to you.  How are you in your today?  I’m doing well today.

We were happy to get a call yesterday evening to tell us Kyle’s wedding ring replacement was ready to pick up.  We are very pleased with both bands!

9 Jan 2018 – it was tricky taking a picture like this with one hand lool!

While we were at the shopping center in Burleson (we try to maximize all the trips that involve leaving the house), he did his customary run to Gamestop whereby he talked himself out of buying any new games.  I limited myself to some Memory Wire instead of stretchy cord for making bead bracelets at Michaels.  At 5 and Below we found something that has been very hard to find this year, a “real” calendar!  We don’t like digital calendars.  Without power you can’t access them for later reference.  When Kyle has to fill out papers for outages he finds having the paper kind of calendar for reference is much easier.   What’s funny too is on the way there we found $2 on the ground.  It was just more than enough to pay for the calendar!   The theme of the calendar we chose was Zen – yay!

Kyle and I had a laugh while in 5 and Below.  I don’t know if you remember me mentioning Kyle and I spending like 9 months trying to find a My Little Pony Celestia.  She was the last Pony to complete the collection Kyle started for me.  Well guess what?!  We found not only one Celestia, but an entire  bin full of them in there!  I wish I had taken a picture!  That happens to us quite often when we can’t find something.  We will finally find it and then the item we were seeking will show up EVERYWHERE! Lol!  BOOM TONS OF CELESTIA’S!  Lol.  I hope they all get great homes.

This is picture of my Grandma Carol Becker celebrating her 75th birthday – (Princess Celestia and Princess Luna from My Little Pony)

This month’s calendar message:  Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony – Mahatma Gandhi

Yesterday we received the Mighty Paw double dog leash and it’s working great!  I took the kids for a spin yesterday after it came in and Kyle took the reigns this morning.   We are both very pleased with the gadget.

Sometimes walking two dogs (or one depending on the dog!) by yourself or with another person can be challenging.  When Links family came by for Christmas, his Mom Tippie and Dad Tyler were hooked up to one (different brand) and it was working really well.  Their son is a pain in the ass, aka “Diablo Blanco,”  to walk so figured this might help and so far so good!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072BF547Q/ref=cfb_at_prodpg

9 Jan 2018 – never mind the blob of me in red and gray. Just wanted to show you what it looks like with two dogs actually hooked up with it.

Mighty Paw Double Dog Leash, Two Dog Adjustable Length Dog Lead, Premium Quality No-Tangle Leash for 2 dogs   (US $15.99)

WHY USE TWO LEASHES AND BOTH HANDS? Enjoy the most convenient and comfortable way to walk two dogs with the Mighty Paw adjustable-length (reflective) double dog leash.

  • WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT? The adjustable lead length accommodates big dogs, small dogs, or both! With our EZ-glide hardware, the leash quickly adjusts from 16-24 inches. The leash accommodates dogs from 0-100 pounds.
  • TANGLE FREE: Never worry about your dogs getting tangled with our innovative tangle-free swivel piece. Our leash rotates freely keeping your dogs comfortable no matter how wild and adventurous.
  • WEATHER-PROOF MATERIAL WITH REFLECTIVE STITCHING: Made with weather-proof nylon and durable hardware, the Mighty Paw double dog leash is sure to last for years to come. To keep you and your dogs safe when the sun goes down, we have added reflective thread stitching along the entire length of the product.
  • CHOOSE WITH HANDLE OR WITHOUT: Add the neoprene padded handle for maximum comfort or simply attach to your every day walking leash, the choice is yours! Regardless of your decision, order worry free with our 90 day 100% money back guarantee

Anyhew….time to get off this thing and go out and see if my chalk slab is dry yet.  I hope this finds you well.  Remember no matter what, make the mediator between your head and your hands your HEART!  Love finds a way to navigate through even the most impossible of challenges.