24 May 2017 Spirit walk this morning (sound and vision – Cygnet Committee David Bowie) and The Vibrations of Conflict (Kenneth Cloke, Daily Good Feature Article and Meditate.com)

Hello to you.  It’s 9:52 am and taking a break after a pretty intense spirit walk/meditation session this morning.  I can tell I’m working through more things I need to and it’s good.  The song by David Bowie Cygnet Committee felt like listening to him talk to me directly.   I know it’s not really so, but that’s how it felt! I had never heard it before today but it is certainly timely and resonates with our current days.

David Bowie – Cygnet Committee

Cygnet Committee

I bless you madly,
Sadly as I tie my shoes
I love you badly,
Just in time, at times, I guess
Because of you I need to rest
Because it’s you
That sets the test

So much has gone
And little is new
And as the sparrow sings
Dawn chorus for
Someone else to hear
The Thinker sits alone growing older
And so bitter

“I gave Them life
I gave Them all
They drained my very soul
…Dry
I crushed my heart
To ease their pains
No thought for me remains there
Nothing can they spare
What of me?
Who praised their efforts
To be free?
Words of strength and care
And sympathy
I opened doors
That would have blocked their way
I braved their cause to guide,
For little pay

I ravaged at my finance just for those
Those whose claims were steeped in peace, tranquility
Those who said a new world, new ways ever free
Those whose promises stretched in hope and grace for me”

I bless you madly,
Sadly as I tie my shoes
I love you badly, just in time,
At times, I guess
Because of you I need to rest, oh yes
Because it’s you
That sets the test

So much has gone
And little is new
And as the sunrise stream
Flickers on me,
My friends talk
Of glory, untold dream, where all is God and God is just a word

“We had a friend, a talking man
Who spoke of many powers that he had
Not of the best of men, but ours

We used him
We let him use his powers
We let him fill our needs
Now we are strong

And the road is coming to its end
Now the damned have no time to make amends
No purse of token fortune stands in our way
The silent guns of love
Will blast the sky
We broke the ruptured structure built of age
Our weapons were the tongues of crying rage

Where money stood
We planted seeds of rebirth
And stabbed the backs of fathers
Sons of dirt

Infiltrated business cesspools
Hating through our sleeves
Yea, and we slit the Catholic throat
Stoned the poor
On slogans such as

‘Wish You Could Hear’
‘Love Is All We Need’
‘Kick Out The Jams’
‘Kick Out Your Mother’
‘Cut Up Your Friend’
‘Screw Up Your Brother or He’ll Get You In the End’

And we know the flag of love is from above
And we can force you to be free
And we can force you to believe”

And I close my eyes and tighten up my brain
For I once read a book in which the lovers were slain
For they knew not the words of the Free States’ refrain
It said:
“I believe in the power of good
I believe in the state of love
I will fight for the right to be right
I will kill for the good of the fight for the right to be right”

And I open my eyes to look around
And I see a child laid slain
On the ground
As a love machine lumbers through desolation rows
Plowing down man, woman, listening to its command
But not hearing anymore
Not hearing anymore
Just the shrieks from the old rich

And I want to believe
In the madness that calls ‘Now’
And I want to believe
That a light’s shining through
Somehow

And I want to believe
And you want to believe
And we want to believe
And we want to live
Oh, we want to live

We want to live
We want to live
We want to live
We want to live
We want to live

I want to live
I want to live
I want to live

I want to live
I want to live
I want to live

Live
Live
Live

Songwriters: DAVID BOWIE
© EMI Music Publishing, TINTORETTO MUSIC
For non-commercial use only.
Data from: LyricFind

There are no strangers here; only friends you haven’t yet met. William Butler Yeats

http://www.dailygood.org/2017/05/24/the-vibrations-of-conflict/

How strange the change From major to minor, Every time we say goodbye. Cole Porter

The Vibrations of Conflict

May 24, 2017— “Cole Porter clearly got it right. But what exactly is it that changes from major to minor when we say goodbye? What permits music to express and stimulate our moods so precisely? How does it ignite or dampen our spirits, make us feel romantic or cynical, lighthearted or blue? Why do simple sequences of musical notes or complex symphonic strains cause us to weep with sorrow, waltz with elegance, march in disciplined military formations, or swirl sensuously across a dance floor? And what does any of this have to do with conflict?” Kenneth Cloake specializes in mediation, negotiation and the resolution of complex organizational, interpersonal, and public policy disputes. He shares more in this thought-provoking excerpt. (1969 reads)

http://mediate.com/articles/cloke3.cfm

The Vibrations of Conflict

Kenneth Cloke August 2003

The Vibrations of Conflict [Excerpted from Kenneth Cloke, The Magic of Mediation: A Guide to Transforming and Transcending Conflict (to be published) © 2003]

How strange the change From major to minor, Every time we say goodbye. Cole Porter

Cole Porter clearly got it right. But what exactly is it that changes from major to minor when we say goodbye? What permits music to express and stimulate our moods so precisely? How does it ignite or dampen our spirits, make us feel romantic or cynical, lighthearted or blue? Why do simple sequences of musical notes or complex symphonic strains cause us to weep with sorrow, waltz with elegance, march in disciplined military formations, or swirl sensuously across a dance floor? And what does any of this have to do with conflict?

The Music of Conflict

In a brilliant comedic sketch on the 1950’s “Your Show of Shows,” Sid Caesar and Nanette Fabray pantomimed a marital spat to the strains of the Overture to Beethoven’s 5th Symphony. Words were wholly unnecessary, as music gave the audience everything it needed to recognize the flow and commiserate with the futility of their argument.

It has often occurred to me, sometimes in the middle of a mediation, that even the most prosaic conflicts have a subtle musical quality about them. In the first place, there is the explicit music of the parties, reflected in their contrasting tempos, pitches, inflections, timbres, and tones of voice. There are solos as individuals hold forth, duets as they discuss, and dissonance as they argue and interrupt each other. There is fortissimo, pianissimo, diminuendo, and crescendo, mirroring the stages of their dialogue and transporting them from fear and rage to forgiveness and reconciliation.

Second, there is the mediator’s calming, measured, propitiating, yet hopeful tone, using tone of voice to draw the parties together. There is the refusing of invited counterpoint, the offering to each side of a solo or aria, and the prompting of a duet or chorus. There is the soprano of injury and distress, the baritone of bitterness and injustice, the bass of hopelessness and depression, and the tenor of optimism and resolution. There is the interplay of score and libretto, moving toward a single harmonious and satisfying finale. Throughout, there is the mediator, trying to orchestrate and harmonize the diverse instruments and blend them into a single symphonic whole.

Third, there is the emotional attunement of the listener to the music that transmits the emotional experience of the storyteller, allowing the listener to resonate, and thereby empathize and approximate the experience of another. Empathetic resonance allows the music to vibrate inside the listener, who experiences secondhand what the speaker experienced, and thereby discovers internally what it might have felt like to have experienced it firsthand.

Historically, it has long been recognized that music stimulates intense emotions. Plato distrusted the emotional power of sensuous music and saw it as dangerous enough to justify censorship. Schopenhauer recognized the deep connection between human feeling and music, which “restores to us all the emotions of our inmost nature, but entirely without reality and far removed from their pain.” Nietzsche described an Apollonian-Dionysian dichotomy in music, representing form and rationality versus drunkenness and ecstasy. For Nietzsche, music was the sensual, Dionysian art form par excellence, which could be used to convey all the emotions for which words would never be enough. Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva declared that “The heart: it is a musical, rather than a physical organ,” and Austrian Philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein maintained that “Every word strikes an emotional tone.”

These observations help us recognize that every emotion, attitude, and mood in conflict possesses a signature frequency and amplitude, a unique rhythm that is communicated as much through tone of voice, pitch, pace, and timing as through verbal description. These unique emotional frequencies are also communicated through body language and gestures, choice of words, and the narrative structure of conflict stories to listeners who are asked to resonate, empathize, evoke, and experience what happened to the speaker within themselves. The mediator or facilitator in this scenario can be thought of as a tuning fork, grounding the conversation in a tone or musical theme with which everyone is asked to resonate, and, if possible, combine into a single all-encompassing, harmonizing melodic strain.

It is clear that different musical rhythms evoke radically different moods. There are rhythms of control, as with marching music; rhythms of exploration as with jazz; rhythms of sadness as with the blues; and rhythms of devotion as with gospel. Each style of music evokes a different set of emotions, memories, and spiritual or energetic responses. Can we then use rhythms of speech to elicit sadness, anger, or fear? Can we counter these dusky tempos with lighter, upbeat rhythms in order to elicit joy, affection, or courage? What are the qualities of vibration that impart these special, substantive meanings? What, for example, is the vibratory quality of a sincere apology as opposed to an insincere one? And how do we know the difference between them?

We appear to decide these issues by combining sensitive, even subliminal information from multiple resonating sources, including inflection, body language, eye contact, auditory signals of stress, and other signs that are often too faint to distinguish consciously, yet are perceived subliminally. Much of what we think, feel, and do in conflict is grounded in these microscopic, subliminal, nearly unconscious messages that are often beneath the level of conscious awareness. In one experiment, for example, volunteers were shown a video with peaceful visual images punctuated by a car crash that produced a characteristic stressful response in the brain. Researchers then sped up the video so that none of the subjects could recognize that there had been a car crash, yet their brains continued to respond as though they had.

The vibrations we receive from others tremble, sway, and oscillate subtly inside us. The consequence of this internalization is that all our conflict responses, from rage to reconciliation, take place within us, and do so at a level that is below that of conscious attention. We routinely make subtle assessments, such as whether we feel respected or discounted by the other person based on the vibratory quality of their speech, or their posture, attitude, or quality of presence as these resonate within us. We make these assessments by paying attention to how we feel when we are with them. As the Sufi poet Rumi wrote:

‘What if a man cannot be made to say anything? How do you learn his hidden nature?’ ‘I sit in front of him in silence, and set up a ladder made of patience, and if in his presence a language from beyond joy and beyond grief begins to pour from my chest, I know that his soul is as deep and bright as the star Canopus rising over Yemen. And so when I start speaking a powerful right arm of words sweeping down, I know him from what I say, and how I say it, because there’s a window open between us, mixing the night air of our beings.’

Indeed, there is rhythm and refrain, euphony and cacophony, not only in music, but in sight, touch, smell, taste, and thought, which are subtly present in every conversation. Unfortunately, we spend so much time and energy focusing on the relatively superficial literal meanings of what people say that we miss much of what they really mean beneath the surface of what they are saying. If we discount the words and simply focus on facial expressions, body language, tone of voice, and the ways their conversation affects us, we may gain a far better understanding of what they actually mean. We know that music strikes people in different ways, so while these effects may be experienced and encouraged, they cannot be predicted or calculated. For this reason, it makes no sense to think of conflict as being created by others without our active participation. When we describe conflict as a tango, we suggest not only that a dance partner has selected us, but that we have selected them, and agreed to sway together to an agreed-upon piece of music. Yet this fact implies that we can stop the dance or change the music whenever we decide to end it, or respond to a different strain of music. Science as Metaphor

Once we recognize that every conflict has emotional, energetic, and spiritual overtones, we can go deeper, and explore the subtle, invisible, vibratory lines along which it, and much of reality, runs. By paying attention to the music of ordinary communication we can discover a hidden fulcrum that can be used to nudge a conflict from impasse to resolution. We can use scientific understanding as a metaphor to find this fulcrum, and consider, for a moment, the part scientists believe may be played by vibration in the universe as a whole. Since Einstein, physicists have been clear that our universe consists of matter and energy which translate directly into each other, and are therefore simply different expressions of the same thing. Matter, which is merely energy moving very slowly, behaves at a quantum level like a wave. Energy, which is matter moving very rapidly, takes the form of a field whose invisible lines of force are revealed, for example, through patterns that can be seen in iron filings sprinkled on a sheet of paper covering a magnet.

Without digressing too far from our topic, many physicists now believe that all matter is composed of vibrating 10 or 11 dimensional strings or “branes,” that vibrate at different frequencies to produce all the known elementary particles. A super-symmetrical unification of all known forces and particles within a single vibrational framework would tell us that the universe does not consist simply of lumps of matter separated by vast reaches of empty space, but of a constant translation of matter into energy and back again, that is expressed through vibrations, waves, fields, “spin” and similar qualities that have no discrete corporeal existence. Particles, which we usually think of as matter, are a tiny part of the universe, separated by unimaginably vast distances. To illustrate, if a proton in the nucleus of an atom were the size of a tennis ball, its electron would be circling two miles away, and the strings scientists theorize would have the same size compared to an atom as an atom has to our solar system. Yet our focus and attention are attracted to particles, or by analogy, to the substantive issues in conflict, with little dedicated to the energetic or vibrational fields created by polarization.

If these speculations by physicists are correct and we live in a world that consists not only of particles of fixed matter, but waves of vibrating energy; if we ourselves inextricably express that world; and if our emotions and spirits are partly explained by thinking of them as wave-like, vibrational, and energetic, we are drawn to consider how our view of conflict and efforts at resolution might shift by treating them as vibrations or waves, rather than as static or particulate. There are many deep and profound issues related to the physical nature of the universe that have had a significant impact on how I think about and respond to conflict. It has been useful to me in mediation, for example, to recognize that I cannot pin down someone’s position and at the same time be precise about their momentum; that my uncertainty about them imparts a kind of structure to the mediation process; and that there is a complimentarity to conflict that allows it to be both fixed or particulate and flowing or wave-like. It has been my experience in mediation that if anything vibrates or resonates, it can be tuned to less adversarial and destructive frequencies. I have found it useful to recognize that in mediation, as in physics, there is no absolute or fixed frame of reference for the perceptions of parties, and when I am able to open heart-to-heart communications, previously hostile combatants merge to form a new, unified, collaborative state, much like a Bose-Einstein condensate in which, at temperatures near absolute zero, individual atoms lose their distinctness to form a single integrated whole and a new state of matter out of thousands of otherwise discrete parts.

I have sometimes found it useful to adopt a geometric analogy that views the parties perceptions of time and space as relative, elastic, and warped by their gravitational attraction to some emotionally massive invisible black hole of pain, around which they rotate at rapid speeds; or to think of impasse as a vacuum in conflict space, and not empty, but seething with polarizing energy that I can borrow for an instant to create something new. These diverse, seemingly inapt physical perspectives have helped me improve the way I think about and articulate what I do, and in the process, led me to new techniques that draw on these understandings.

While these physical examples are metaphoric, they point to underlying unities and relationships. Thus, if I begin with Einstein’s proof that space and time are part of a single equation; that mass bends the shape of spacetime, and that this elastic geometry of spacetime tells matter how to move, I can predict that the greater the density or mass of emotion surrounding a conflict, the greater the distortion it will create in the relational spacetime geometry that connects and separates people, and the greater the gravitational tug, which may result in their going into continuous orbit around each other, or fall more rapidly toward its’ center. Following this line, it helps my understanding of conflict to shift from linear, particle-like, mechanical theories of causation to complex, wave-like, relativistic fields with multiple interacting causes and effects. Developing a field theory of conflict will allow us to recognize its’ complex movements and energetic fluctuations at different points of time and space. Similar changes in our understanding take place when we shift from assuming conflict is regular and predictable to seeing it as chaotic, self-organizing, and sensitively dependent on initial conditions.

Geometry can also be used to enhance our understanding of relationships, since conflict is above all a relationship – not only with others, but with ourselves, the past, present, and future, and the environment in which it occurs. Space, then, translates into relative qualities of distance, angle, and trajectory, while time translates into relative qualities of speed, frequency, and direction, and the angle by which one approaches or examines something. Examining the angle of our speed and position relative to others can help define the meaning of our conflict.

Similarly, we can learn from evolutionary biology and computer algorithms about the competing and collaborating elements that are responsible for the evolution of conflict as a complex self-organizing system. Just as gravity was reduced by Einstein to the flexible geometry of spacetime, so species differentiation was reduced by Darwin to the adaptive process of evolution, in which birth and death, competition and collaboration, change and conservation combine to produce a continuously fluctuating natural selection process that carries useful lessons for conflict resolution.

Using evolution as a metaphor allows us to see that people in conflict face environmental pressures from their partners, families, cultures, organizations, and societies that subject them to the unpredictability of non-equilibrium conditions, and require them to learn and adapt in order to survive. Conflict can then be seen as a series of competitive environmental or ecological crises that require ever more advanced levels of skill and collaboration to resolve.

In these ways, nature provides us with metaphors about symmetries, forms, and patterns that can be used to analyze and affect conflict behaviors. We may then recognize that nature is not “out there” but “in here.” We are nature, perhaps constituted out of vibrating ten dimensional strings, but certainly made up of wave-like quarks, gluons, protons, neutrons, and electrons, all obeying the laws of physics. We are living, evolving organisms composed of organic compounds, bacteria, and diverse collaborating cells. We are primates with a capacity not only for rational thought, self-awareness, and strategic thinking, but irrationality, blinding emotion, and self-destruction. Every part of nature is manifested through us in countless ways that can help us understand how and why we behave as we do when we are in conflict, and lead us to newer and more powerful methods of resolution.

Orchestrating the Vibrations of Conflict

Adopting a vibrational metaphor for conflict allows us to develop our skills by treating communications as though they were waves rather than particles, and working with their elements at a more subtle level. For example, waves possess both amplitude and frequency and can be cancelled by equal and opposite waves, or amplified and increased by adding waves of a similar frequency. We can use tone of voice to stimulate others to increase their empathy, or communicate emotion at a deep level of authenticity, or acknowledge a willingness to settle, or let go of grief and rage. All this can be done not merely by using words that convey precise meanings, but by tone, pitch, frequency, and modulation.

We can stimulate awareness through intentional acts and rituals as by shaking hands, through body movements as by nodding, through tone of voice as by whispering, through repetitive phrasing as by summarizing, through timing as by process intervention, or simply through the vibrational quality of who we are as by spirit and heart-based communications. Each of these, if used with the right person at the right time can create a sense of spiritual connection, relational synergy, emotional resonance, and sympathetic vibration without words. As Rumi also observed:

There is a way between voice and presence where information flows.

By thinking of emotions as waves or vibrations, we can consciously de-escalate our conflicts by lowering or deepening our tone of voice, slowing the pace or frequency of our comments, softening our pitch, using repetitive, modulated phrasing, and emphasizing vowel sounds as opposed to harsher sounding consonants. We can release pent-up emotion by leaning forward, nodding rhythmically and repetitively, taking a deep breath and releasing it slowly, using caressing gestures while not actually touching the other person, or using a gentle touch or pat to produce a calming effect. All these vibratory acts intersect, resonate with, and direct the attribution of meaning within the listener.

At a deeper level, it is possible to change the rhythmic patterns of our words. We can significantly alter what is communicated, for example, by repeating key words or phrases, slowing down, or using rhythmic emphasis, as was done to great effect by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and John F. Kennedy. At a deeper level still, it is possible to make peace and tranquility so powerful within ourselves that without any of these interventions, others intuitively understand that it is unnecessary to act aggressively toward us.

I frequently use vibrational qualities of voice, body language, metaphor, pacing, liturgical repetition, and my own clear, committed, heart-based intention to calm parties in mediation and induce a sense of trust and comfort in the process. To do so, I expand my awareness of what is happening in the present moment and do not get stuck in the past or the future or worry about what I am going to do next. Sometimes, as in deep meditation, I experience a subtle, background vibration that is extremely calming. This vibration does not occur as thought or emotion or body sensation, but transcends them. The phrase that best describes this state of mind is an ancient Zen definition of enlightenment, which is: being available for anything at every moment. When I am in this state, others may become calm effortlessly. In truth, conflict is inherently chaotic and so sensitively dependent on initial conditions as to be unpredictable, making it impossible to plan in advance how to respond. It has been my experience that when I have a pre-set plan it often goes awry because I cannot move naturally, in concert with what people just said or did. On the other hand, when I am able to sense the vibratory, wave-like quality of what is occurring in the conversation and am completely open, present, and available for whatever others may say or do, I am able to respond in creative, unimaginable ways that are far more effective than the best prepared strategies. This does not make strategy or planning irrelevant, but provisional and secondary to experience.

How We Attribute Meaning

The more we listen to our inner voice, the more clearly we can hear the voices of others. Indeed, when we consider how sense impressions are processed, the entire distinction between self and others begins to unravel and dissolve. It is clear, for example, that all our sensory perceptions are based on a combination of unreliable factors, including external objects that produce or reflect waves or vibrations which strike specialized sensory detectors, which transmit electrical signals through neurons to the brain, where synapses are arranged in patterns based on previously experienced patterns stored in memory, which result in our attribution of meaning. Minor errors in any of these maneuvers will result in radically distinct meanings.

Vision is a coordinated, even collaborative relationship between an object, light, the eye, nerve cells, the brain, and patterns of meaning created by our prior experiences. What we see is therefore not actually outside us, but a relationship between what is inside and outside. Light waves of specific frequency and amplitude are reflected off objects at angles that render them perceivable by the eye, but perception necessarily includes the attribution of meaning, which takes place inside us. This does not mean the things we see are not also seen by others and therefore, according to convention, objectively exist. It means that attributing meaning is highly personal, based on individual prior experiences, dependent on multiple variable inputs, interpretations, and choices that can be altered to create equal and opposite meanings. Thus, it can be argued that the people we love and hate are only a complex set of externally triggered internal vibrations we have imbued with special meaning based on past experiences, and that these meanings exist only inside us due to our unique history. While others may experience something similar, it is clearly impossible to say anything about anyone else without simultaneously describing ourselves.

Every attribution of meaning is therefore a combination of sensory perceptions and individual experiences, intentions, personalities, and innermost nature, all of which are communicated through wave-like interactions. As a result, we can chose at any time to interpret our perceptions differently, or recall and amplify a set of experiences we previously ignored, or interpret events differently. We can design fresh experiences that cancel previous wave patterns, recognize that we have selected from a mass of perceptions only those that fit a predetermined emotional pattern, discover the source of this pattern within ourselves, and consciously dismantle it. Attribution of meaning is therefore not fixed or static, but open to change and constantly evolving, as revealed in the following case study.

No More Teachers Dirty Looks – A Case Study

Several years ago, I mediated a dispute involving Rose, a teacher who was being fired for yelling at three other teachers and using what might be considered “world-class” swear words in front of children during school hours. Rose had been chair of the union at her school for twenty years and a strong advocate for teachers. The incidents that threatened her job all began six months after she stepped down as head of the union.

At the mediation, the three teachers angrily described what Rose had said and done to them. Rose responded defensively, first by denying that what she had done was so serious, then by attacking the other teachers for having provoked her, and finally by quibbling over details in their descriptions of each event. The mood was one of entrenched animosity, unyielding blame, impasse, and shared recrimination.

Sensing the determination behind her resistance and at the same time being aware of its’ utter futility, since the Principal had made it clear that without a full resolution Rose would be terminated, I did something I had not planned or thought about in advance. I stopped her mid-sentence in one of her defensive counter-attacks against her accusers, and said: “Excuse me, Rose. Can I ask you a question?” She said “Yes,” and I asked simply, softening my tone of voice, lowering my posture, and leaning towards her until I was at the very edge of her personal space: “Has anyone ever thanked you for what you have done for this school?” Her mouth dropped open and she burst into tears and sobbed uncontrollably. I decided to deepen the spiritual opening created by her response, and after a moment of warm, sympathetic silence, I turned to her accusers and asked them if they would each tell Rose directly one thing she had contributed to the school, and thank her for having done it. Now they all began crying, and as they told their stories about Rose’s dedication to teachers and the school, the defensive “vibrations” and atmosphere of impasse were totally transformed.

After the teachers finished and Rose stopped crying long enough to speak, she apologized profusely for what she had done. She said she cared so much about the school and about the teachers and children, but didn’t know how to show it, and was desperately unhappy about how useless she had become. Her “accusers” supported her by saying they knew she cared about them and about the school, and apologized to her for becoming accusatory rather than reaching out and helping her make what must have been a very difficult transition. Together they decided there was something they could still do – not merely for teachers, but for the school as a whole, by helping everyone learn from what happened, work more collaboratively as a team, and develop new teacher leaders.

I suggested they might start by letting people know how they had resolved their conflict, and asked what they wanted to do to communicate to others what they had decided and help the school heal. Rose said she felt she needed to apologize to the entire faculty and staff, and would start by asking to be put on the agenda for the next all-hands meeting. The other teachers said she should not have to do this alone, and wanted to join her in apologizing for their role in the conflict. Everyone began crying all over again, but this time with joy at their newfound solidarity. I suggested that they go together to ask the Principal to put them on the next agenda, and that they each describe at the meeting what they learned from this conflict about teaching, teamwork, and solving their problems together. They readily agreed.

I again decided to do something unplanned and push the opening just a little wider. Rose said she had gone to one of the teachers after yelling at him, apologized, hugged him, and asked him if she could take him to lunch to make up for what she had done. The teacher said it had shocked him at the time because Rose was not known as someone who hugged people or invited them to lunch. Riding this wave of collegiality, I asked them if they would all agree to hug each other each time they meet, and go to lunch as a group at least once a week between now and the end of the semester. They enthusiastically agreed, and I asked Rose whether she would agree to invite others who also had problems with her to join her for lunch, and find out what they could do together to improve the school. She agreed.

I later heard from the Principal how shocking and transformational it was to see Rose, the tough-talking union advocate, hugging everyone and inviting all her former enemies to lunch. He said the faculty meeting at which they apologized had transformed the culture in the school, triggered a profound conversation about how the faculty and staff needed to care more for each other, and actually resulted in better teaching and fewer disciplinary problems with students.

In retrospect, it is clear that while Rose was thoroughly defended against insult, isolation, and attack, she was utterly defenseless against compliment, inclusion, and acknowledgement. Her toughness was a barrier erected to protect herself against her own vulnerability, which collapsed at the slightest push in the right direction. Analyzed in vibrational terms, the gentleness, kindness, and open-heartedness that were contained in the question I asked regarding acknowledgement conveyed a vibrational frequency that spoke directly to her heart and touched a deep chord that released her pent-up emotions. What allowed me to discover that question was not merely a sense of intellectual futility about the way the conversation was going, or a sense of emotional frustration over her lack of ownership, or the depth of understanding in the teachers’ stories, or even a physical discomfort with the stress-filled accusatory/defensive dynamic that filled their argument, but a spiritual, energetic, vibrational sense of what must lay beneath those layers of defensiveness and rationalization.

By going to my heart and asking a question that came directly from the vibrational quality I wanted to elicit, I was able to touch her heart in ways I could not have done by asking a question from intellect. Although it happened very quickly, the question flowed from intuition, empathetic resonance, and my willingness to place myself in her shoes. From there, I asked what would have made me do as she did, and was able to find a question that would reveal whether my intuition was correct.

These moments of “sublime mediation,” or what is sometimes called “crazy wisdom,” represent a kind of “peripheral mind,” which, like peripheral vision, consists of paying attention to the background rather than the foreground, and empowering one’s intuition. In this state, it is possible to notice the subtle vibrational differences between anger and caring, defensiveness and pain, and within myself, between judgement and empathetic resonance. Intuition is not infallible, and for this reason should take the form – not of an answer, but of a question that might be asked by a three year old. If my intention is clear and I have no judgements, agendas, or stake in the outcome, I may be able to combine innocence and curiosity with directness and honesty in a simple, disarming, heart-based question that suddenly exposes the nucleus of the conflict.

 

Biography

Kenneth Cloke is Director of the Center for Dispute Resolution and a mediator, arbitrator, consultant and trainer, specializing in resolving complex multi-party conflicts, including community, grievance and workplace disputes, organizational and school conflicts, sexual harassment and discrimination lawsuits, and public policy disputes, and in designing conflict resolution systems for organizations. He is a nationally recognized speaker and leader in the field of conflict resolution, and a published author of many journal articles and several books, including Mediation: Revenge and the Magic of Forgiveness and Mediating Dangerously: The Fontiers of Conflict Resolution . His consulting and training practice includes organizational change, leadership, team building and strategic planning. He is a co-author with Joan Goldsmith of Thank God It’s Monday! 14 Values We Need to Humanize The Way We Work, Resolving Conflicts at Work: A Complete Guide for Everyone on the Job, Resolving Personal and Organizational Conflict: Stories of Transformation and Forgiveness; The End of Management and the Rise of Organizational Democracy, and The Art of Waking People Up: Cultivating Awareness and Authenticity at Work. His latest book, Journeys into the Heart of Conflict will be published in 2015.

He received a B.A. from the University of California; a J.D. from U.C.’s Boalt Law School; a Ph.D. from UCLA; an LLM from UCLA Law School; and has done post-doctoral work at Yale Law School. He is a graduate of the National Judicial College in Reno, Nevada. His university teaching includes law, mediation, history and other social sciences at a number of colleges and universities including Southwestern University School of Law, Pepperdine University School of Law, Antioch University, Occidental College, USC and UCLA.

24 May 2017 Meeting famous musicians and the half-breed (Dreams)

Good morning to you.  How are you today, now?  It’s 6:41 am as I begin to write to you and I hope this finds you well in your place in time. Last night I did a lot of dreaming and actually got some deep sleep for a change.  Link’s bites are healing – amazing stuff organic apple vinegar!  Nothing really worked but that to help stop him from itching so much.

I had more than the two dreams I am going to share but these are the important ones I think.

I dreamt about talking to my brother-in-law Drew about meeting famous musicians and how nice it would be.  I always wanted to meet David Bowie but it just wasn’t meant to be.  There was something about his fiancé Ale’s hoodie being cut into three parts and sewn back together.  The next one was about stopping a stray dog from running into the street.  Kyle was greeting dogs in a yard and I saw men/boys coming that didn’t like it (they were carrying what looked like gun cases) and one of the dogs in the yard tried to run but I stopped him before getting in the street – the dog looked like a mix of a King Cavalier spaniel and a Chihuahua.

The second dream was unlocked by a couple of things.  All the thoughts I’ve been about what has been going on in Europe, specifically Great Britain, thinking about Diana last night, having Queen Elizabeth on my mind and having seen some historical footage of her recently on PBS and the news I had heard about the Queen getting on Harry and William about airing their laundry too much in public.  The dog in the dream makes me think of Prince Harry.  I couldn’t access this article but it is the one that came to mind.

What the dog in my dream looked like – King Cavalier and Chihuahua Mix

  1. News about Queen Elizabeth Getting On Harry And

    bing.com/news
    Queen Elizabeth Thinks Prince William & Prince Harry Need to Put a Lid on It
    The Stir · 2 days ago

    According to a new report, Queen Elizabeth has had it up to her scepter with Prince William and Prince Harry baring their souls … feels “lonely” sometimes. While the public, understandably, can’t …

23 May 2017 Night Rose (drawing)

Good evening to you, it’s 9:26 pm and before I head to the bath for a soak, wanted to share this one last drawing for today.  There were many others I did but this one is special.  It is an amalgam of my first best friend Laura and a woman I thought she looked a lot like and that I greatly admired Princess Lady Diana.   Diana comes to my when I think of  all the turmoil going on in Britain right now.  I am certain if she was still here, she would be out trying to bring comfort to those hurting!  Much love to everyone.

23 May 2017 My spirit walk at home and Combichrist – Get Your Body Beat

These pictures are the result of my spirit walk at home today.  The rain stopped and the wind blew enough to dry off my canvas to do it.  For me, what a spirit walk is about is allowing myself to flow and process, without question or examination, what comes to me.  This is my daily practice.  What comes may be confusing and off-putting so some or crystal clear to others.  I’m just passing things along as they come, as I feel I am supposed to do with this.  Nothing belongs to me and if I can help even one other person, albeit it just be me, than so be it.  As you will read in the lyrics below, I have given up on giving a fuck what anyone else feels, thinks or believes about me.  All that matters is what I am doing, thinking and feeling.  I do censor myself with what I share here and anywhere else for concern of others to a certain extent, but not to the point it obstructs the overall message.  What is here is in no way to imply that I am anything other than just me, Jackie.  Just one of 7 billion plus “channels” for which information of this nature can be sent and received.  Mindfulness, awareness and paying attention – this is what you must practice each day and I am trying to do that.  What I have come to realize for myself is the image I am developing of the God is a being of energy made up of each one of us as part of the one.  It’s partially why things are not going so well right now — imagine there being 20 of different versions of you in one room trying to solve a problem?!  One of you is Christian.  One of you is a Jew.  One of you is an Muslim.  One of you is Black, White, Brown, Yellow or even Gray skinned.  One of you is an artist.  One of you is an car mechanic and so on but all still the one You.  This is why “group-think” like governments, religions and other organizations like major corporations frequently experience discord, in-fighting and literal division of the “cells” and factions.  We are biologically incapable of perceiving the world all of the same way!  There must be learning to agree to disagree….compromise….being willing to walk in another’s shoes.

My prayers go out to every living being on this planet today like they always do – especially the folks in Manchester.  As always my prayer is for whatever is for the greatest good of all which I hope doesn’t include the caning, maiming, abuse, neglect and murder of anymore people that can’t help being who they were born to be.   People can’t just “stop being gay, straight, or otherwise.”   They can make choices about their religious, political and entertainment which is part of the direction perspective can go with being “gay, straight or other – LGBTQ.”  Fear is at the core of most wars whatever the battlefield.  I’m sick, tired and frankly bored with wars, the perpetual “loops” aren’t you?!

This song was playing on my Ipod shuffle when the battery suddenly failed.  I went to my phone that also has my playlist on it and the song was next along with  “Live from NY radio…..”  That will make sense to some of those who know me.  Just passing things along as they come.

Combichrist “Get Your Body Beat” Music Video

 

http://lyrics.wikia.com/wiki/Combichrist:Get_Your_Body_Beat

Combichrist:Get Your Body Beat Lyrics

1,908,746pages on
Get Your Body Beat

This song is by Combichrist and appears on the album What The Fuck Is Wrong With You People? (2007) and on the Soundtrack album No Redemption (2013).

Trick your brain to set the score
Can you take the pain at all?
I try to understand you girl
But you gotta earn it
Fuck it up and let it go

Get your body beat
Let your blood flow
Get your body beat
Let your blood flow
Get your body beat
Let your blood flow
Get your body beat
Let your blood flow

Doesn’t matter what you say
Never understood at all
Don’t give a fuck what people say
Glad your piece is just for show
Grab its neck and don’t let go

Get your body beat
Let your blood flow
Get your body beat
Let your blood flow
Get your body beat
Let your blood flow
Get your body beat
Let your blood flow

Get your body be-at

Uploaded on Jun 10, 2006

Get Your Body Beat, Combichrist’s new single released in the summer of 6/6/06 following the music video containing clips from the movie “The Gene Generation”

 

23 May 2017 Home Repairs (is it only about profit?), evening drawings and Against the Clock: How Tech Has Changed Our Perception of Time (Daily Good Feature article)

Good morning to you. It’s 11:28 am as I begin to write to you on this very wet Tuesday morning. More rain came through but didn’t preclude the folks working on replacing siding on our house from completing the job today. Just as they finished it started pouring down rain lol.

In talking with the subcontractor Home Depot used to do the work on our house, I found out about a couple of things worthy of discussion. One was the burden of disposal of supplies after a job (cardboard etc) being put on the contractor and two, how jobs are coordinated.

Apparently after a job is complete Home Depot doesn’t seem to have a system in place for the subcontractors they hire to dispose of materials and packaging for material after a job is complete. It is put on the subcontractor to do this and for the one that was hired to do our house, it can be an expensive problem. With the volume of cardboard and material he has to dispose of, he can’t just put it curbside for trash pick-up and it is expensive to take it to the landfill. Cardboard shouldn’t be going to a landfill anyways! I found myself rather surprised that a major company like this wouldn’t have a system in place for this. If they did, and they might but just not here, which means lack of standardization and cohesion in business practice in my opinion, they would be doing their part to help the environment. I don’t understand why every Home Depot and Lowe’s wouldn’t have a contract set up with recycling companies to take care of all reusable/recyclable waste from the jobs they do and the business they conduct each day. I feel everything we use should be reusable and or recyclable.

Job coordination. The steps that occurred for us to get new siding on our house involved a sales man to come out and make the pitch, a person who came out and did measurements for the job and then the subcontractor who actually did the work – oh and don’t forget the engineers and job coordinators and schedulers! Each of the parts leading up to the actual installation were loosely, if not connected at all. This doesn’t make sense to me. What does make sense to me is the subcontractor and each of these people should be involved with the process from start to finish. Working together as a team for cohesiveness and continuity all the way through the process to ensure the best quality of jobs are done. This way everyone is in the loop!

Engineers design things through drawings, models and simulations but seldom are directly involved or see the outcome of their designs and this is unfair to all those in the steps that follow. The vision of the engineer does not involve being on the ground where there is weather conditions to contend with as was with our job – rain. They do not see how much work sometimes has to be done to make their designs “work” properly because it’s one thing to imagine something and quite another to make it reality.

We are very pleased with the work but disappointed in the process!

What I see from the perspective of a homeowner from our latest home repair experience, is in businesses like Home Depot and Lowe’s, they seem to be focused on the end rather than the means to get there. Meaning, they seem to be placing more emphasis on what they will get for the job, than what it takes to do the actual job like the people who work for them directly and indirectly, supplies and the environmental impact of the resources they buy, sell and use for their businesses. I would venture to bet this is an issue for most major corporations in our world these days. It used to be about taking care of those who worked for you so they would want to do their best for you in turn. It used to be about caring about the quality of your goods and services and customer satisfaction….not just profit.

Profit from misery of any kind be it emotional, physical, mental and or spiritual is a flawed modality in which to conduct business. You get as good as you give.

There are some who are in the business of profit that I suspect will never be content, never satisfied, never “full”…..there will never be enough. I would say to them that you can’t put tangible into the space reserved for the intangible. It’s like trying sustain light in a black hole.

3 Aug 2016 – sometimes we see things from a single point of light (our front door peephole)

http://www.dailygood.org/2017/05/23/against-the-clock-how-tech-has-changed-our-perception-of-time/

Forever is composed of nows.
Emily Dickinson

Against the Clock: How Tech Has Changed Our Perception of Time

Against the Clock: How Tech Has Changed Our Perception of TimeMay 23, 2017— Alan Burdick’s most recent book, “Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation,” chronicles his quest to understand the nature of lived time. He recently joined Douglas Rushkoff, media theorist and author of “Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now,” for a conversation on what we miss about the nature of time when we only think about it as a number. The conversation touches on the tension between experienced time and number time, how to align more closely to the body’s natural chrono-biology, and how, because of technology, we are losing the experience of the expansiveness of time. (1605 reads)

Forever is composed of nows. –Emily Dickinson

 

Against the Clock: How Technology Has Changed Our Experience of Time

–by Heleo Editors, syndicated from heleo.com, May 23, 2017

Alan Burdick is a staff writer and former senior editor at The New Yorker whose first book, Out of Eden: An Odyssey of Ecological Invasion, was a National Book Award finalist and won the Overseas Press Club award for environmental reporting. His most recent book, Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation, chronicles his quest to understand the nature of lived time. He recently joined Douglas Rushkoff, media theorist and author of Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now, for a conversation on what we miss about the nature of time when we only think about it as a number.

This conversation has been edited and condensed. To view the full conversation, click the video below. 

https://www.facebook.com/video/embed?video_id=381176748913913

Douglas: [Both our books are] about time, or about the now. For me, the Present Shock was that there are two kinds of time. The Greeks have two words for time: “chronos”, which is like time on the clock, and “chiros”, which is more like readiness, human time. You crash the car at 4:27, but when do you tell dad that you crashed the car? I always say, “After he’s had his drink, before he’s opened the bills.” That’s chiros, human time, the way we experience time, versus real time or number time.

For me, it became important in the digital age, as our style of clock time changed, what does that do to our understanding of real time? You looked at the same relationship in a different way.

Alan: I started out feeling like I understood what space-time is, but that doesn’t really have a lot to do with the time that we actually live in from moment to moment. Then there’s clock time. I came to understand what that is, and it turns out to be really strange. But I didn’t really understand what is this stuff in us that we call time? It turns out that we have all kinds of clocks in us—in our cells, in our mind—and I had begun with a notion that there is this tension between clock time and technological time. I didn’t even want to wear a watch for a long time.

Then I came to embrace it, as I began to understand that time isn’t just a thing that I put on my wrist, but it’s a thing that we create organically between us, almost like a language.

Douglas: Right, if you burrow deep into it, it becomes real again. [When] the clock went up in the clock tower in the medieval village, people stopped trading value and started working for time. It was the invention of the employee and hourly wages, which led to five centuries of “time is money,” which is why in some ways the watch or the Google Calendar feels oppressive. Then you pushed through that and found something reassuring.

Alan: I think so. Even cavemen had to deal with time, to a certain degree. Even if their clock is just the sun, daylight and nighttime, you need time in order to coordinate your activities, even if it’s hunting wooly mammoths. “Let’s all meet at the cave entrance at sunrise.” Then we get it in our clock towers, and now we have it on our wrists, and it is this organizing force, for better or worse. But it does start to get oppressive when you’ve got it on your phone and you pull your phone out of your pocket, and there’s the time, and you’re always thinking about the time. It gets a little overwhelming.

“Indigenous cultures tended to use the moon as a way of organizing their sense of time, and when they used the moon, they were getting in sync with some stuff that we’re only learning about now, the different neurotransmitters that tend to dominate during different weeks of a lunar cycle.”

Douglas: And that stream of time feels like it doesn’t really take into account the way my organs and the body and the culture moves through temporal landscapes. There’s the circadian rhythms or chrono-biology through which we experience the world. Indigenous cultures tended to use the moon as a way of organizing their sense of time, and when they used the moon, they were getting in sync with some stuff that we’re only learning about now, the different neurotransmitters that tend to dominate during different weeks of a lunar cycle. It’s like our obsession with that number makes us lose track of all these other cycles that are moving along with it.

Alan: All times become basically equivalent, even though they actually aren’t.

Douglas: Right, generic, it’s just a number. It’s not just a number.

Alan: That was really interesting to me, this notion that there are different better times of the month to be doing things. Your own schedule takes that into account. Can you say more about that?

Douglas: I did take it into account until I surrendered back to the demands of the world. I got disciplined when I found out that the four weeks of the lunar cycle and the first week of a new moon tends to be dominated by acetylcholine, the next week is dominated by serotonin, then dopamine, then norepinephrine. I started looking up what happens to a body and a brain when it’s bathing in acetylcholine versus dopamine. I realized, in the first week of a new moon, acetylcholine, I’m going to do lots of gathering of new ideas. The second week, the serotonin week, it’s as if you’ve got a bunch of Prozac in you: I’m going to work, to barrel through and get my writing done.

Dopamine week is a party week, a week that I stop writing, force myself to not write, to engage with people. Then the norepinephrine week is the fight or flight week, which is when you pull back and get very analytic. That’s where I would put all my notecards on the wall, make my crazy wall of ideas, and reorganize things, what goes in what chapter. When I worked that way, I actually wrote fewer days per month, but I got more done.

My productivity went up, and my sense of well-being went up too. It felt like a discipline at first, and then it almost felt like there was an internal compass I was getting in touch with. It made sense—there’s four seasons, there’s four parts of the breath, there’s four directions. Not being religious about it, but being aware of it.

Alan: But you let all that go?

Douglas: Well, it let me go. The problem is the demands of the modern life. You’ve got the inbox, and there’s all these people and everybody wants something, or you’re in book promotion mode. When a book comes out, your schedule is no longer your own, the publisher calls, there’s NPR that wants to talk to you at four in the morning, you’re up. You serve that, but you can’t live like that all the time.

Alan: When I was working on this, I had a full time job, and so I always had to decide, “Am I going to get up super early, at four o’clock in the morning?” which is a time of the day not particularly conducive to doing anything except lying in bed. “Or am I going to stay up until two o’clock in the morning?” What I ended up doing was neither. I would go to bed early, and then wake up at midnight or one o’clock in the morning and work for two or three hours. It was like there was this whole other day packed away in the middle of the night. I actually learned there’s a great book about the history of the night.

It turns out that before the advent of modern lighting, people did not sleep eight hours straight. They would go to bed, have what they called the “first sleep”, and then they would wake up at midnight or one. Sometimes they’d stay in bed, but a lot of people got out and dealt with their cows or their fields, or they would even go into the village and do a little work in their shop.

Douglas: At night? With little candles?

Alan: Yeah, and then they would go back to bed at two or three in the morning.

Douglas: The opposite of siesta. That’s so weird, but in a way that’s perfect.

Alan: But it all went away with electric lights, because now—

Douglas: You stay up later.

Alan: Now we think you can colonize any part of the day.

Douglas: Right, the colonization of human time. I’m sure there’s people from the captology labs of Stanford thinking, “How can we use what we’ve learned from [Why Time Flies] to make people spend more time on our website, but think that it’s only been a minute?”

Alan: Science has half-figured out how. Mars has a 25-hour day, and our circadian cycles are 24 hours long, so if we do make it there and live there, it’s like crossing three time zones every two days. They figured out a way to zap you with certain wavelengths of light at certain times of day that will actually give you a 25th hour of the day.

“Time can go faster, or slower, depending on what drug [a person takes] or what they’re doing—meditation, ecstatic experience, entertainment experiences—there’s a joy in it. The disconnection from the clock itself is exhilarating, whichever way it happened.”

Of course you’re spending that hour of the day being exposed to peculiar wavelengths of light, so I’m not sure you’re really gaining.

Douglas: The joy of your book is this sense of connection and disconnection from the clock, this sense of what does it take for a person to move into almost a god-like place. Time can go faster, or slower, depending on what drug [a person takes] or what they’re doing—meditation, ecstatic experience, entertainment experiences—there’s a joy in it. The disconnection from the clock itself is exhilarating, whichever way it happened.

Alan: I was in Alaska for a couple of weeks in the summer, where the sun never sets. It’s freaky and disorienting. It’s absolutely beautiful. But people divided themselves up into two groups. There were the people who just went with it and slept whenever they wanted and ate whenever they wanted. They were in their own temporal world. Then other people, including myself, felt like, in order to remain sane, “I am going to wear my watch and go to bed at 9:30, even if it’s broad daylight, and I’m going to wake up at six a.m., even if it’s broad daylight, and I’m going to live according to my watch.”

Douglas: That’s a little bit like Lord of the Flies—there’s the ones who stay with civilization, maintain the codes to stay sane, and the others who are like, “We’re free, let’s go nuts.” But you want both in your life. You want to have those moments where you’re disengaged. Because our brain is working all the time to make sense of this stuff. You’ve got this great section where you say that one of the main things the mind does is it takes all these data points from reality, and desperately tries to string them together into something that makes sense.

You said it almost as if it’s quite possible it makes no sense. We’re just doing this in order to have a coherent experience of this chaos.

Alan: Part of time is understanding and grasping the order in which things happen in time—sequence. That actually turns out to be a lot more plastic than we give it credit for. You can fool the brain into thinking that B comes before A, in some cases.

I took part in an experiment in which you press a keypad and move your mouse on the screen, but effectively, it had the appearance of the cursor moving before I pressed the button, so effect came before cause. It was super freaky. Every time, I would see my cursor move and think, “I’m going to fool it now and not press the button,” and then I couldn’t stop myself from pressing the button.

How would you describe your relationship to time?

Douglas: It’s gotten screwed up. I don’t blame tech, but I blame the way we’re applying tech, at least. It has to do with my ability—and I feel like this is a national problem—to have perspective on the past. I feel like the past used to be smaller, because it happened a long time ago, and now… The simplest way to say it is if a person I utterly forgot about from second grade now tries to friend me on Facebook, they come into my present without the scale of a person from far away.

They’re at the same scale as any other friend on Facebook, and I feel like this whole nationalism thing, whether it’s Britain doing Brexit, or Trump saying, “Make America Great Again,” it abuses a false connection to the past. It’s exploiting this inability to have proper proportion and perspective on the past. That feels so digital to me.

Alan: When Edison invented the phonograph, there was this scathing review in the Spectator, of this critic saying, “We’re completely disregarding the virtues of oblivion, the benefit of being able to forget.” Now that every voice can be stored forever, we’re going to be haunted by these voices that won’t ever go away.

Douglas: That’s true. Somewhere in Talmud there’s this rule that Jews are not supposed to remind someone of something embarrassing from their past. You can’t say, “I remember when you were 12, and you used to…” Because it doesn’t give the person the liberty to move past that. You keep bringing them back to it.

This whole effort, whether it started with My Life Bits and Facebook timelines, that everyone’s supposed to record their history as if Yale University Library Archives is waiting to store our entire history for future researches—most of us are not that interesting. But everyone is doing that. That’s a strange thing, it pulls you out of the chiros, the present, it doesn’t give you those when time flies moments. It keeps tying you back.

Alan: I have this vision of Facebook in 100 years in which even people who have died, their Facebook presence continues—not only remains, but expands. We’ll not only be able to see pictures of them, but we’ll hear their voices. Your great-grandmother will be calling you with advice about who you should or shouldn’t date. It will all not only be available, but will start speaking.

Douglas: With AI, Ray Kurzweil-ian now-ness to it.

Alan: We’re going to be nostalgic for futurism, because it’s going to be all past-ism.

Douglas: The other thing that got me weirded out from your book was I thought that atomic clocks didn’t really work right, which is why they moved them every once and awhile. But it’s not.

Alan: No, Earth is the problem.

We’re drifting away from the sun, but the sun is getting bigger. That could be a problem in five billion years. In the 1960’s, seconds were defined from the top down: there’s the day, rotation of the Earth, 24 hours, 60 minutes in an hour, 86,450 seconds in a day. It’s just division, a theoretical thing.

Then physicists were like, “Well, if you get a cesium atom and it goes through nine billion plus phase transitions in the span of a second, as defined by this 86,000 metric, then we can do the same thing,” and that’s what we’ve been doing, except that we get farther and farther away from that 1960 definition of the top-down second, because that keeps slowing down.

Douglas: But as far as human bodies are concerned, that’s the only one that matters. When we change time from the segments of the day from the portions of the cycles of life to these independent durations, a second is no longer a part of a minute. That’s screwed up, too. Doesn’t that turn time from this way of understanding our experience to this tyranny of numbers?

Alan: The way that national clocks create time is they have atomic clocks that tick seconds, and then you can add seconds up to figure out the time of day. But the phrasing they use is they “realize” seconds, and they “disseminate” the time. It’s like propaganda.

Douglas: I love that, though. Time is the ultimate propaganda because death is the ultimate fear. Time is the best medium through which to trigger and exploit that Becker denial of death stuff.

Alan: Do you have tricks for turning off the time?

“When we talk about this experience of time flying as we get older, the years seem to go by faster, what’s actually happening, studies show, is that we’re under more time pressure as we get older.”

Douglas: It’s hard when there’s a child going to school in the morning. This is a big project, but I’m wondering if there’s a way to be free of the Google Calendar, if I could do it for a month or two. I don’t like that I spend a large portion of my day answering emails which means putting more things into that calendar, most of which I don’t even really want to do. Then, if the Google Calendar is dictating my next month, and there’s only three hours in it left for me, that’s not good. I don’t want to keep doing things now that screw up the passage of time in the future. I’m bankrupting my own temporal landscape.

Alan: When we talk about this experience of time flying as we get older, the years seem to go by faster, what’s actually happening, studies show, is that we’re under more time pressure as we get older. It’s not that the years are actually going by faster, it’s that we are spending more of our later years scheduling. We’ve got more to do, you’re looking at your calendar more, you’re trying to get more done in the same amount of time than you were when you were five or 10 years old. Of course time went a lot slower when you were five or 10, because you didn’t have a schedule, you weren’t thinking about time.

Douglas: We didn’t have play dates. That infinite, open sky quality of childhood, which is [now] less and less wandering around the neighborhood and finding worms, good stuff. There was an expansiveness. After reading your book, I would say the expansiveness was expansiveness of time. I thought of it as space; it wasn’t, it was time.

Alan: It was the expansiveness of not thinking about time.

Douglas: That’s a liberty I think we deserve, and I’m going to make it come back, I am.


Syndicated from Heleo.com. Heleo seeks to elevate ideas and deepen the cultural conversation. From science to business, healthy living to the arts, Heleo features insightful writing and in-depth conversations with the world’s top writers and thinkers. 

 

22 May 2017 My spirit walk in town today – the three Mary’s

Hello to you.  It’s 3:39 pm and Kyle and I are back from lunch at our favorite local place, Taqueria Torres and my 3 hour walk in town!  I had to get out for some peace as they are hard at work on the house AND fixing the street in our neighborhood and it is noisy lol!  I’m grateful but it’s hard for me to have spirit time when there is a lot going on.  So I packed my camera bag with shoelaces for a strap (the strap that belongs to the bag is Spot’s make-shift harness for dog walks) and set out.  Kyle stayed home with the dogs and the folks working on the house.

It is amazing what happens when you allow yourself to go on a walk with the God of your understanding or as my friend Patty Ladale says, “internal navigation system.”  If the voice inside says go right, you go right and just walk and then you find something that leads to something else.  That’s what happened today and I am sharing my walk with you in pictures.  Where my walk lead was to two Mary’s and our local cemeteries Veterans Memorial and then lunch at our favorite Mexican food place that has a 3rd Mary on display inside, I’ve shared her with you before (last pic in gallery).

I hope my sharing this with you can help you somehow reader.  Thank you for allowing me space in your time to share this.  Love to you!

 

22 May 2017 My outdoor chalk meditation this morning – if you mind the “why”, you don’t have so many “what’s” (core of problems and preventing/solving them)

This meditation was spurred by my feeling a great deal of sorrow and anxiety after my post this morning.  What came to me, “It doesn’t matter where it is coming from, just let it pass through….feel it.”  I sat down by the large garden gate and just cried.  Then I saw a large snail moving slowly on the small side garden next to the house and I thought of my birth mom  Jeanne.  On 25 May she would be 75 and adding there is a lot of symbology in all those numbers and dates….5’s, 7’s and 12’s.  Watching the snail I thought of the slow passage through the “garden gate.”  I thought of my Mom and the slow passage through the “garden gate”…..passing through.  Then I thought again of what I’ve come to believe is the process of heaven to earth and back again…it is all connected by water.  Water is the key to it all and with what I and so many others have been witnessing going on in our shared skies…heavens….it’s like watching an attack on heaven.  What comes up, comes down and then back again.  The clouds are the key to the random nature of all things and what are clouds?  Vapors, a solid ship made from what it receives from the Earth.  If we contaminate the Earth we also contaminate “Heaven.”  When you take a drink of water, pure and untainted drinking water, you are taking a drink of Heaven and the potential of the future.  It’s a perfect system and we have been putting price tags on it…..trying to possess and control it.  What goes up, comes back down and so it is for all things.  We must clean up the “Messy Garden” and in turn restore the Heavens…restore balance between Heaven and Earth.

Nothing I am writing or exploring is new or revelationary – we’ve been in this “loop” for millennia…since forever.  I’ve just found a different way to convey it.  God will keep changing the dial, changing the “channel” until we learn these basic truths.  Everyone is looking for an answer.  Many can’t possibly imagine the answers could be so simple – it’s too easy!  No it’s quite complicated to try to get 7 billion plus parts of one body to cooperate for one common purpose…..peace.   Think of how complicated it is for just one person to find peace within themselves?  Magnify it to the Earth, to all dimensions and Universes….each thought a person has in a day to a deity size….yeah…it’s not easy but it is possible.  Anything is possible if you have Faith….that was my Mother’s middle name and mine is Joy which is what comes from true Peace.

22 May 2017 Staff Sgt Edwin Caba and Thomas Ponce (Daily Good Feature articles about our relationship with Animals), The Spiral (poem), Drawings and August Rush (movie)

Good morning to you. It’s 7:25 am on this wet Monday morning….it rained again last night! No complaints here! The workers will have some soggy boxes of materials to work with today but we had been assured it won’t affect the quality of the siding installation.

A couple great articles from the Daily Good that I wanted to pass on – those who know me know that I love nature and animals very much.

http://www.dailygood.org/2017/05/21/sergeant-helps-abandoned-animals-in-afghanistan-find-homes/

The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated. Mahatma Gandhi

Sergeant Helps Abandoned Animals in Afghanistan Find Homes

May 21, 2017— While Staff Sgt. Edwin Caba served in Afghanistan, a litter of puppies born on his base brought a sense of much needed joy and relief to the soldiers. Many didn’t want to part with them once their tour ended. Enter Nowzad Dogs. Since 2007, the nonprofit has reunited more than 700 soldiers with the animals they cared for on duty. As the only official animal shelter in the country, it also helps find homes for abandoned animals in Afghanistan. Founder Pen Farthing, a former Royal Marine sergeant, named the organization after after Nowzad — a dog that adopted Farthing, and followed him back to base after he broke up a dogfight. The dog had such an effect on Farthing that he found a way to take her home. In doing so, he realized he wanted to help others do the same. (947 reads)

American Humane

http://www.americanhumane.org/program/military/

We are committed to helping America’s veterans and recognizing their heroic contributions to our country – both on and off of the battlefield

American Humane has been first to serve with the U.S. military for a century: Our animal rescue program was born on the battlefields of World War I Europe, where, at the request of the U.S. Secretary of War, volunteers with American Humane deployed to rescue and care for 68,000 wounded war horses each month.

We continue to proudly honor this legacy today through American Humane’s Lois Pope LIFE Center for Military Affairs. The program, founded through the generosity of philanthropist and passionate veterans advocate, Lois Pope, offers meaningful support to our Armed Forces with two key areas of focus: first, providing lifesaving service dogs to veterans suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress (PTS); second, protecting America’s hard-working military dogs and recognizing their heroic contributions to our country – both on and off of the battlefield.

About American Humane Lois Pope LIFE Center for Military Affairs

Philanthropist Lois Pope is one of the nation’s leading advocates for America’s active-duty military, veterans, and military animals.

The driving force behind the establishment of the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial in Washington, D.C., the nation’s first and only permanent public tribute to the four million living disabled veterans and those who have died, she recently endowed the American Humane Lois Pope LIFE Center for Military Affairs. The Center builds on American Humane’s 100 years of work with the U.S. military by providing life-changing, life-saving programs to:

Help military K-9 teams on and off the battlefield

Help veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress and Traumatic Brain Injury obtain lifesaving service dogs

Reunite retired military dogs who are left overseas with their former handlers

Support military families in need with healing therapy animals

Recognize and honor the life-saving contributions of military hero dogs

Provide healthcare to America’s four-legged warriors when they finish service to their country, so that they can enjoy the healthy, happy retirement they so richly deserve

With her help – and yours – American Humane is opening a second century of caring for our military heroes – at both ends of the leash.

http://www.dailygood.org/story/1592/thomas-ponce-on-behalf-of-all-living-beings-awakin-call-editors/

The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man Charles Darwin

Thomas Ponce: On Behalf of All Living Beings

May 22, 2017— Thomas Ponce is a 16-year-old animal rights advocate and a citizen lobbyist from Casselberry, Florida. He is the founder of Lobby For Animals, the Coordinator for Fin Free FL, and founder of Harley’s Home, which is used as his school-based animal rights club. A vegetarian at age of 4, he began writing about animal rights at the age of 5. Soon after, Thomas’s parents realized that his advocacy for animals was not a phase, but a way of life. “I feel that it is our responsibility as both citizens and human beings to use our minds, hearts and voices to speak up against the injustices we see in the world,” explains Thomas. More in this in-depth interview with this teen activist. (321 reads)

Last night we were testing to see whether or not the DVD’s we bought worked. Kyle put in his movie choice, The Incredibles and nope…will have to return it as the disk skips. So the last one to test was August Rush. He originally wasn’t going to watch it with me because he thought of it as “my movie” and because Jonathan Rhys Meyers was in it. He’s felt that my interest in Jon has been “off-putting” which is fair. The first two times I went to the hospital, were precipitated or had something to do with my fascination with his potrayal of Alexander Grayson in the NBC show Dracula. Kyle has some residual PTSD from going through what we’ve been through, as I explained in a blog recently: https://saymber.com/2017/05/07/7-may-2017-caretakers-can-get-ptsd-too-poem-bird-drawings-from-this-morning-and-the-shamanic-view-of-mental-illness-jayson-gaddis/ .  Anyhew,  it is what it is and we can only move forward. Everything happens for a reason. The DVD disk worked and Kyle ended up watching the whole film with me. He enjoyed it – how could you not love a movie about music?!  Music, to quote August/Evan from the film, “we love it more than food.”

The opening scene from this movie is the closest I’ve seen to what it’s like when I am outside with or without my music. I connect with everything and it is like having wings – flying without having to leave the ground.

August Rush Opening

 

https://saymber.com/tag/city-of-alvarado-animal-shelter/

Spiral

by Jackie Wygant 21 July 2011

Ancient and primitive as time and space

All things go round and round

Bend from the beginning and back into the same place

The travelers wear different skins and voices

Wear thin the grass on the mountain

As they make the same choices

Different colored eyes and skin rise, breathe and become dust

Their creations gleam and shine so briefly

For soon the torrents of the jet stream char the sky with rust

Back to back, shoulder to shoulder

In their separateness bound with twine

They watch as the future is on fire while the past still smolders

The lessons written in every tongue, most primitive stain

Too painful to remember the truth

They live the past again

Twisting and turning

Always to the beginning

Returning

21 May 2017 The Game and the Messenger (drawings)

Hello to you.  It’s 2:08 pm this overcast but lovely Sunday.  Just finished a pretty “heady” meditation outside and this is what came out of it.  I know some of this may not make sense or seem pretty far out, but that is the difference between the spirit world and the reality we all share.  When you spend time with the God of your understanding and just “shut yourself” up for a minute, it’s amazing what happens and the insights you might be shown.   One of the biggest challenges I have always had is talking too much – either inside or outside of myself.  Lately when I’ve been doing these drawings I will try to think too hard at first and then will come the voice, “just draw!”  Just like anything in this life that you want to do well, it takes practice.  The lead man doing our siding installation said he trained for 9 years to know how to do what he does.   I told Kyle this morning, it’s taking me 49 years to get this far and I still have much to learn!  You are never complete.  You are never finished.  You are never done.  This process of refinement is an eternal process because perfection does not exist.  There is perfection in imperfection because there is always room left to learn and grow beyond this moment of who we are.

I don’t know everything there is to know about this life and all it’s mysteries – each day is another day in Earth School!  (for my friend Castle).

 

21 May 2017 Dreams, Drawings , Dr. Strange revisited and Streams in the Desert message for today

Hello to you – it’s Sunday morning and we just had a nice bit of rain, lightning and thunder pass through….yay!  Clean canvas!

Link woke me up again this morning with his scratching and I yelled out loud, “God damn it!!!” really loud and went to the spare bedroom to try to go back to sleep.  When I got up this morning, I got to clean up Link’s “panic poop” he did trying to find me after I left the bedroom. I deserved that! It’s not Link’s fault he’s got bug bites that wake him up in the night!  Not God’s fault either!

ANYWAYS! I ended up dreaming about my mother-in-law Beth and her son Cole coming home to yet another house I didn’t recognize (this happens a lot when I dream about Beth and Cole) while Kyle and I were there. Kyle and I were upstairs and I could see her and Cole walk in the door, it was light out. She had bought candles.  One I remember had a Halloween theme to it and I said, “How did you know I needed to buy another candle?” (in real life I do lol!). There had been a child there with us before the came in, he had dark hair, that slipped out before they came home like a ghost.  I can’t remember his face and something about dirty dishes in the dishwasher.

Did some drawings yesterday and one of them seems to coincide with the Doomsday vault getting flooded in Svalbard Norway. I drew the picture and then when I got on my computer, saw the headline. A lot of what I’ve been experiencing, thinking about and drawing is coinciding with what we saw again in Dr. Strange as we started watching it last night. Just going with it.  I hope my sharing this with you can provide an insight into your own spiritual journey.  Every day is a chance to begin it, that is if you haven’t already!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/05/20/norway-boost-doomsday-vault-entrance-tunnel-breached/

Norway to boost Doomsday vault after entrance tunnel was breached

Credit: Ralph Lee Hopkins /National Geographic

By David Millward

20 May 2017 • 11:02pm

Defenses at Norway’s “Doomsday vault” where thousands of varieties of crop seeds are stored in case of natural disaster are to be reinforced.

The move follows water gushing into the tunnel entrance after the permafrost melted last year.

Although no seeds were damaged there is concern that the vault, which is buried deep inside a mountain near the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, could be vulnerable.

In watching Dr. Strange again, I’ve noticed a couple of things that I also felt after the first time we saw it — the special effects overshadow the movie. The scenes with special effects are just too long and I would have liked to have seen more story and dialogue. I feel they should have let Ben “be British” because I could tell from watching him that it was awkward not to be – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Strange. Ben is an amazing British actor – he IS Sherlock Holmes to me like Christopher Reeves will always be my Superman, Chris Hemsworth Thor, Tom Hiddleston Loki, Heath Ledger The Joker and Jonathan Rhys Meyers Alexander Grayson (Dracula) – you get the idea. Sometimes the casting of an actor/actress to a role is like it was made just for them and other times it seems like watching someone wear very uncomfortable clothes and shoes….just doesn’t fit. I can see why they cast him for the part – he looks the part! Could have stepped right out of the comic book renditions of Dr. Strange. It’s important to remember that it’s more than a “look” that brings a character to life.

May 21

“I call to remembrance my song in the night.” (Psalm 77:6)

I have read somewhere of a little bird that will never sing the melody his master wishes while his cage is full of light. He learns a snatch of this, a bar of that, but never an entire song of its own until the cage is covered and the morning beams shut out.

A good many people never learn to sing until the darkling shadows fall. the fabled nightingale carols with his breast against a thorn. It was in the night that the song of the angels was heard. It was at midnight that the cry came, “Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him.”

Indeed it is extremely doubtful if a soul can really know the love of God in its richness and its comforting, satisfying completeness until the skies are black and lowering.

Light comes out of darkness, morning out of the womb of the night.

James Creelman, in one of his letters, describes his trip through the Balkan States in search of Natalie, the exiled queen of Serbia.

“In that memorable journey,” he says, “I learned for the first time that the world’s supply of attar of roses comes from the Balkan Mountains. And the thing that interested me most,” he goes on, “is that the roses must be gathered in the darkest hours. The pickers start out at one o’clock and finish picking them at two.

“At first it seemed to me a relic of superstition; but I investigated the picturesque mystery, and learned that actual scientific tests had proven that fully forty percent of the fragrance of roses disappeared in the light of day.”

And in human life and human culture that is not a playful fanciful conceit; it is a real veritable fact. – Malcom J. McLeod.