13 June 2022 Earth School

Examples of the Golden Ratio in nature coexisting together

Hello to you. How are you today? I hope your doing ok! Todays post is a reflection of some exploring, questioning and learning I’ve been doing lately. When you live alone and are a nerd like I am you have time for such things! I have so many questions for Earth School! I know most people visiting my blog don’t exactly have a lot of time for themselves or for learning unless they have a specific question or are officially in a learning situation like going to school. May be something here will interest you too – I hope! If this is too much for one visit – I encourage you to come back when you can. Sending you love energy and a virtual hug.

What are you learning in Earth School today?

Romans 1:20New International Version

20 For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made,(A) so that people are without excuse.(B)

https://medium.com/@gautamnag279/what-is-so-special-about-the-number-1-61803-7e0bbc0e89e2

Why is the golden ratio called the God ratio?

The Golden Ratio (phi = φ) is often called The Most Beautiful Number In The Universe. The reason φ is so extraordinary is because it can be visualized almost everywhere, starting from geometry to the human body itself! The Renaissance Artists called this “The Divine Proportion” or “The Golden Ratio”.May 5, 2019

https://medium.com › …

What Is So Special About The Number 1.61803? | by Gautam …

Learned something new today when I was wondering about some of the environmental impacts of drilling for oil in the United States. You don’t get something for nothing or even cheap. Ultimately some cost will be paid either immediately or over the course of time:

Subsidence – sinking of the ground because of underground material movement—is most often caused by the removal of water, oil, natural gas, or mineral resources out of the ground by pumping, fracking, or mining activities.Apr 15, 2021

https://oceanservice.noaa.gov › facts

What is subsidence? – National Ocean Service

https://www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/go-outside/does-oil-drilling-cause-sinkholes-or-earthquakes/?amp

In cases where other liquids don’t move in, such as in the North Sea off The Netherlands, the porous rock layer that harbored the oil originally can collapse after extraction, causing slight amounts of land settling (known as “land subsidence”) in the rock layer surfaces above, but typically no more than a few tenths of an inch per year.

Here in the U.S., land subsidence induced by the large volume extraction of underground resources including oil and gas “is more common than most people realize,” according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a government agency which collects, monitors, analyzes and provides scientific understanding about natural resource conditions, issues and problems. Flat coastal plains and wetlands near sea level are most at risk from this potential side effect.

Have you ever heard of the term transpiration? I hadn’t either but when I was finding out about part of where our fresh drinking water comes from this term came up:

https://kids.kiddle.co/Transpiration

Transpiration is the evaporation of water from plants, especially leaves. It is a type of translocation and part of the water cycle. The amount of water lost by a plant depends on its size, the light intensity, temperature, humiditywind speed, and soil water supply.The process of Transpiration helps in regulating temperature in the plant.

Transpiration was first worked out by Stephen Hales (17 September 1677 – 4 January 1761), an English clergyman. He proved what is still believed, that the evaporation of water molecules from leaves is the main force pulling the water column up from its origin in the roots.

How transpiration works

Leaf surfaces are dotted with openings called stomata, which act rather like pores. In most plants there are more on the undersides of the leaves than on the top. The stomata are bordered by guard cells that open and close the pore. Transpiration happens when the guard cells open the stomata. This lets oxygen and water vapourflow out, and carbon dioxide flow in. The carbon dioxide is used in photosynthesis, and the oxygen is produced by photosynthesis.

https://youtu.be/YeOw-wJR9fc – Leaf Transpiration (experiment) what is transpiration?

A lot of people single and with families are struggling financially right now with the prices of most everything increasing – inflation. Sometimes getting confused about the difference between a want and a need can contribute to the daily struggle. In the times we are in it’s important to know the difference and set priorities accordingly. There are a lot of things I used to do and buy that I realized I could do without because they aren’t essential to my survival and in some cases were harmful to the environment – so many chemicals, packaging and trash! I used to waste a lot of money on these things I didn’t need and a lot of it just ended up down the drain or in a landfill:

https://study.com/academy/lesson/the-difference-between-wants-vs-needs-in-economics.html

Wants, Needs and Economics

Quite simply, the economic definition of a need is something needed to survive. In economics, the idea of survival is real, meaning someone would die without their needs being met. This includes things like food, water, and shelter:

“A want, in economics, is one step up in the order from needs and is simply something that people desire to have, that they may, or may not, be able to obtain. Again, with those two simple definitions, it doesn’t seem like there should be much to talk about, but there is. Economics deals with how we allocate scarce resources, and those scarce resources may be needed to meet someone people’s needs and other people’s wants. So, we do need to talk about wants and needs.”

A fun song I have been enjoying:

https://youtu.be/3EoI-6lQFIE – The Contours Do You Love Me