14 Jan 2018 Emergence (Drawing) and What exactly is Emergence? (Peggy Holman Cultivating leadership for complex times)

Hello,  how are you?  Keeping it short.  I did a scan of the headlines and even in places I was hoping to find something positive…nope!  Thankfully a couple of WordPress blogs I read this morning did have positive messages; here are links if you wish to check them out!

https://empoweredeverydayblog.wordpress.com/2018/01/14/promise-me/

https://patrickrealstories.wordpress.com/2018/01/14/patrick-concept-of-blessings-simple-way-to-bless-others/

The final drawing I did yesterday was one I really liked and may even put to canvas at some point.  What came to mind about it was the word Emergence.  What is the definition of this word?  It’s not an easy word to define I found out!  I found Peggy Holman’s method understandable for someone like me and a couple of videos on the different spectrums of understanding.  The whole subject has lit a spark of “wow! that’s fascinating!” in my brain!

When  I was thinking of it after doing my drawing, I was thinking of shining even when we don’t want to – emerging out of our personal darkness and shining.  Quite simple compared to what I’ve watched and read this morning!

13 Jan 2018 – I really liked this drawing after I was done. The word Emergence came looking at it. It is so hard sometimes to emerge from where we are hiding, our personal darkness in order to share ourselves with others and shine our personal light in the world. Kind of a personal hokey pokey perhaps?! “One foot in, one foot out….”

http://peggyholman.com/papers/engaging-emergence/engaging-emergence-table-of-contents/part-i-the-nature-of-emergence/chapter-1-what-is-emergence/

Chapter 1. What Is Emergence?

If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.

—Carl Sagan, Cosmos

For most of us, the notion of emergence is tough to grasp because the concept is just entering our consciousness. When something new arises, we have no simple, shorthand language for it. The words we try seem like jargon. So we stumble with words, images, and analogies to communicate this whiff in the air that we can barely smell. We know it exists because something does not fit easily into what we already know.

Emergence disrupts, creates dissonance. We make sense of the disturbances that emergence creates partially through developing language that helps us to tease out useful distinctions. As the vocabulary to describe what is emerging becomes more familiar, our understanding increases. For example, disturbance, disruption, and dissonance are part of the language of engaging emergence. These terms are cousins, and I often use them interchangeably. Disruption is the most general of the three words. If something involves an emotional nuance, chances are that I call the disruption a disturbance. When conflict is involved or the disruption is particularly grating, with a lack of agreement or harmony, I will likely refer to its dissonance.

This chapter helps build a vocabulary we can all use by defining emergence. The chapter also provides a brief history of how our understanding of emergence has evolved. It offers some distinctions between strong and weak emergence and describes essential characteristics of emergence—what it looks like and how it behaves. The chapter ends by reflecting on the challenge of learning how to engage emergence.

Defining Emergence

In the preface, I defined emergence as simply as possible: order arising out of chaos. A more nuanced definition is higher-order complexity arising out of chaos in which novel, coherent structures coalesce through interactions among the diverse entities of a system. Emergence occurs when these interactions disrupt, causing the system to differentiate and ultimately coalesce into something novel.

Key elements of this definition are chaos and novelty. Chaos is random interactions among different entities in a given context. Think of people at a cocktail party. Chaos contains no clear patterns or rules of interaction. Make that a cocktail party in which no single culture prevails, so that no one is sure how close to stand to others, whether to make eye contact, or whether to use first or last names. Emergent order arises when a novel, more complex system forms. It often happens in an unexpected, almost magical leap. The cocktail party is actually a surprise party, and everyone knows where to hide and when to sing “Happy Birthday.”

Emergence produces novel systems—coherent interactions among entities following basic principles. In his bestseller Emergence, science writer Steven Johnson puts it this way: “Agents residing on one scale start producing behavior that lies one scale above them: ants create colonies; urbanites create neighborhoods; simple pattern-recognition software learns how to recommend new books.”1 Emergence in human systems has produced new technologies, towns, democracy, and some would say consciousness—the capacity for self-reflection.

A Short History of Emergence

If we want to engage emergence, understanding its origins helps. Scientist Peter Corning offers a brilliant essay on emergence.2 He brought a multitude of sources together to describe an evolution in perspectives. I have paraphrased some highlights:

  • Emergence has gone in and out of favor since 1875. According to philosopher David Blitz, the term was coined by the pioneer psychologist G. H. Lewes, who wrote, “[T]here is a co-operation of things of unlike kinds. The emergent is unlike its components . . . and it cannot be reduced to their sum or their difference.” By the 1920s, the ideas of emergence fell into disfavor under the onslaught of analysis. Analysis was seen as the best means to make sense of our world. In recent years, nonlinear mathematical tools have provided the means to model complex, dynamic interactions. This modeling capability has revived interest in emergence—how whole systems evolve.
  • Emergence is intimately tied to studies of evolution. Herbert Spencer, an English philosopher and contemporary of Darwin’s, described emergence as “an inherent, energy-driven trend in evolution toward new levels of organization.” It described the sudden changes in evolution—the move from ocean to land, from ape to human.

Although evolutionary scientists have done much of the work, people from a variety of disciplines have also struggled to explain this common and mysterious experience. What enables an unexpected leap of understanding in a field of study or practice? In 1962, Thomas Kuhn contributed to our understanding by coining the term paradigm shift to describe a tradition-shattering change in the guiding assumptions of a scientific discipline.3

Then the Santa Fe Institute, a leader in defining the frontiers of complex systems research, took the work further. Engagingly told by Mitchell Waldrop in his book Complexity, the story of how the Santa Fe Institute was born reads like a great adventure.4 In the mid-1980s, a hunch brought biologists, cosmologists, physicists, economists, and others to the Los Alamos National Laboratory to explore odd notions about complexity, adaptation, upheavals at the edge of chaos.5 Though their disciplines used different terms, they shared a common experience with this strange form of change. They were no longer alone with their questions. Others were exploring the same edges.

They gave this experience a name: emergent complexity, or emergence for short. While emergence has aspects of the familiar—Mom’s nose, Dad’s eyes—it is its own notion. It isn’t just integrating old ideas with what’s new. It is something more—and different. It is whole systems evolving over time. Single-cell organisms interact, and multicellular creatures emerge. Humans become self-conscious and track their own evolution.

In Emergence, Steven Johnson speaks of how our understanding of emergence has evolved.6 In the initial phase, seekers grappled with ideas of self-organization without language to describe it. Without a coherent frame of reference, the ideas were like a magician’s illusion: our attention was diverted to the familiar while the real action was happening unseen in front of our noses.

As language emerged—complexity, self-organization, complex adaptive systems—a second phase began. These terms focused our attention in new directions. People started coming together across disciplines to understand the nature of these patterns. The Santa Fe Institute was central to this phase.

During the 1990s, we entered a third phase, applied emergence, in which we “stopped analyzing emergence and started creating it.”7 In other words, we could see emergence occurring naturally in phenomena like anthills. And we started working with it—for example, developing software that recognizes music or helps us find mates.

This book is about creating conditions for applied emergence in our social systems. It aims to help us work with the dynamics of emergent complexity so that our intentions are realized as life-serving outcomes.

Distinctions Between Weak and Strong Emergence

Scientists distinguish two forms of emergence: weak and strong emergence. Understanding this distinction clears up some confusion. Predictable patterns of emergent phenomena, such as traffic flows and anthills, are examples of weak emergence. In contrast, strong emergence is experienced as upheaval. When disruptions dramatically change a system’s form, as in revolutions and renaissances, strong emergence has occurred.

Weak emergence describes new properties arising in a system. A baby is wholly unique from its parents, yet is basically predictable in form. In weak emergence, rules or principles act as the authority, providing context for the system to function. In effect, they eliminate the need for someone in charge. Road systems are a simple example.

Strong emergence occurs when a novel form arises that was completely unpredictable. We could not have guessed its properties by understanding what came before. Nor can we trace its roots from its components or their interactions. We see stories on television. Yet we could not have predicted this form of storytelling from books.

As strong emergence occurs, the rules or assumptions that shape a system cease to be reliable. The system becomes chaotic. In our social systems, perhaps the situation is too complex for a traditional hierarchy to address it. Self-organizing responses to emergencies are an example. Such circumstances give emergence its reputation for unnerving leaps of faith.

Yet emergent systems increase order even in the absence of command and central control: useful things happen with no one in charge. Open systems extract information and order out of their environment. They bring coherence to increasingly complex forms. In emergent change processes, setting clear intentions, creating hospitable conditions, and inviting diverse people to connect does the work. Think of it as an extended cocktail party with a purpose.

Characteristics of Emergence

Although the conversation continues, scientists generally agree on these qualities of emergence:

Radical novelty—At each level of complexity, entirely new properties appear (for example, from autocracy—rule by one person with unlimited power—to democracy, where people are the ultimate source of political power)

Coherence—A stable system of interactions (an elephant, a biosphere, an agreement)

Wholeness—Not just the sum of its parts, but also different and irreducible from its parts (humans are more than the composition of lots of cells)

Dynamic—Always in process, continuing to evolve (changes in transportation: walking, horse and buggy, autos, trains, buses, airplanes)

Downward causation—The system shaping the behavior of the parts (roads determine where we drive)

The phrase “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts” captures key aspects of these ideas. Birds flock, sand forms dunes, and individuals create societies. Each of these phrases names a related but distinct system. Each system is composed of, influenced by, but different from its mate: birds and flocks, sand and dunes, individuals and societies.

As with all change, emergence occurs when disruptions shape the interactions. In emergence, coherence breaks apart; differences surface and re-form in a novel system. The two most frequently cited dynamics:

No one is in charge—No conductor is orchestrating orderly activity (ecosystems, economic systems, activity in a city).

Simple rules engender complex behavior—Randomness becomes coherent as individuals, each following a few basic principles or assumptions, interact with their neighbors (birds flock; traffic flows).

Twelve-step programs characterize these ideas at work. Most participants are fiercely independent people who are not there to follow someone in authority. Yet with the guidance offered through 12 statements, these programs are highly complex, worldwide organizations that have influenced the lives of millions.

No doubt the simplicity of these two dynamics may leave many senior executives and government agency heads skeptical. No one is in charge? Not likely. Isn’t it interesting that the word order is a term for issuing instructions? What happens when orders come from the top? If they disrupt existing functions of the organization, sometimes it moves in novel and useful directions. And sometimes the orders produce entirely unexpected—emergent—outcomes that arise from within the system, bearing little resemblance to the orders given.

If managers say, “We’re too complex for simple rules,” chances are they’re confusing complicated and complex. We often make things more complicated than necessary. Filling out a form in a bureaucracy is a common example. Complexity is entirely different. Complexity has elegance. It is, to paraphrase Einstein, as simple as possible but not simpler.

Emergence is an energy-efficient approach to accomplishing complex tasks. Consider the different costs of handling conflict through dialogue versus war. Negotiations among a handful of diplomats can lead to breakthrough agreements for all involved. In contrast, armed conflict involves thousands and generally produces results that work for one party, along with loss of life and property for all involved. Quite a different proposition in time, money, and life!

How Does Novelty Emerge?

Two key dynamics shape how novelty arises—how systems, including us, learn and adapt. Increasingly complex and novel forms emerge from interactions among autonomous, diverse agents, like us, through

  • feedback among neighboring agents, and
  • clustering as like finds like.

Feedback

Systems grow and self-regulate through feedback. Output from one interaction influences the next interaction. We talk to a neighbor, we share some of the discussion with friends, and suddenly everyone in town knows that Sally married Harry.

Disruptions are feedback. They signal potential change. Most of us focus on the symptoms, the visible outcomes of such signals. A fight breaks out, and we concentrate on who is winning and losing. What caused the fight? How else might it be resolved? We ask different questions when we pay attention to what’s behind the feedback.

Feedback opens communication. It connects what’s inside and outside, at the top and bottom, across and within systems. It gives us a chance to notice what is emerging and discern its meaning.

Systems theory uses feedback loops to help us map how interactions influence each other. It names two types of feedback loops: reinforcing and balancing loops.

Perhaps this is how the fight erupted: I speak my mind. It pushes your buttons; you get mad and push back. Even if I hadn’t intended to irritate you, now I’m on the defensive. To protect myself, I attack you. And things escalate. In what is called a reinforcing feedback loop, output reinforces an action in the same general direction—sometimes toward more, sometimes toward less. Reinforcing loops are also called vicious or, when healthy, virtuous cycles.

Another form of feedback occurs through balancing feedback loops. Opposite forces counteract each other. Separation of powers among executive, legislative, and judiciary branches of government illustrates balancing loops. Each keeps the others in check. In healthy systems, those that continually learn and adapt, balancing loops periodically interrupt reinforcing loops, ending their perpetual growth. Without such checks we get global warming, economic meltdowns, and cancer.

Clustering

As we interact, feeding back to each other, like attracts like. Some of us bond around a shared characteristic. For example, we both like the same candidate for office. Over time, small groups with similar interests form. Perhaps parents advocate for a new style of school. With continued interaction, small groups become larger groups. Increasingly complex networks take shape when something binds them together. Parents, teachers, and small businesses unite to create new types of schools. At some point, a complex and stable cluster arises. It has unique properties unlike its individual elements. A national movement for charter schools takes off. Something novel emerges.

Humans are talented at pattern matching—clustering like with like. We even do it unconsciously. We see it indirectly in how towns and cities form. Asian districts exist in San Francisco, New York, and London. All of the auto dealerships are in the same part of town. As maps of the Internet are created, clusters of highly interconnected sites are appearing. We are experiencing emergence in process. Through our increasingly sophisticated technology, we can track complex networks forming. New tools show us the neural networks of the brain, the ecosystems of nature, and social structures in cultures. The ability to see complexity is reinvigorating interest in emergence. We can finally study complex patterns over time and space.

Such tools make complex stories visible. For example, at a 2010 Journalism That Matters conference, a map of Northwest news and information Web sites caught the attention of an executive editor. He noticed the competition in the center of the map. He searched long and hard to locate his organization. A colleague explained that their antiquated technology caused the problem. No doubt, priorities changed when the executive returned to the office.

Learning How to Engage Emergence

The story of emergence is still young. We have struggled with its existence, described some of its properties, and given it a name. We are early in understanding what it means to social systems—organizations, communities, and sectors such as politics, health care, and education. We are just learning how to work with it to support positive changes and deep transformation.

In social systems, emergence can move us toward possibilities that serve enduring needs, intentions, and values. Forms can change, conserving essential truths while bringing forth innovations that weren’t possible before. In journalism, traditional values of accuracy and transparency are making their way into the blogosphere, social network sites, and other emerging media.

Emergence is a process, continual and never-ending. It emphasizes interactions as much as it does the people or elements interacting. Most of us focus on what we can observe—the animal, the project outcome, the object. Emergence involves also paying attention to what is happening—the stranger arriving with different cultural assumptions that ripple through the organization or community.

Emergence is a product of interactions among diverse entities. Since interactions don’t exist in a vacuum, the context also matters. That is why just bringing diverse people together won’t necessarily lead to a promising outcome. Initial conditions set the context. How the invitation is issued, the quality of welcome, the questions posed, the physical space, all influence whether a fight breaks out or warm, unexpected partnerships form.

In truth, working with emergence can be a bit like befriending Kokopelli, a trickster of the ancient Pueblo peoples of the American Southwest, or his Norse counterpart, Loki. Working with mischievous spirits always has some catches.

Back to the Table of Contents

On to Chapter 2. What’s the Catch?

A couple of videos, if you type the word Emergence in to You Tube, there are more:

PHILOSOPHY – Metaphysics: Emergence

Emergence – How Stupid Things Become Smart Together (Kyle and I had to laugh about this)

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12 Jan 2018 There are no rules in dreams

 

12 Jan 2018 – Last drawing of the day….brrrr so cold lol! This is me dreaming about energy ships that can stack on top of each other.

12 Jan 2018 – notes of what I was thinking with regards to these stacking energy ships. Inspired by the Keshe Foundation Magrav coil stacks.

Hello to you.  It’s 5:05 pm on this cold Friday afternoon.  I normally don’t post more than once a day,  but wanted to share this “stuff” with you.  What came to me while I was explaining this to Kyle, is that what’s great is there are no rules for me when it comes to dreaming about energy, space travel etc.  I’m not obstructed by the “rules” that come with having degrees in physics, math, astronomy, engineering and all that.  I get to dream.  I get to just imagine.  I have no clue if anything I dream up would “work” in this world.  I don’t care if it all makes sense.  The ideas come from somewhere and I am not going to let rules get in the way of my recording what comes!  I feel a responsibility to just pass on what comes.  May be one of these strange things could eventually be a missing piece for someone who is actually trying to develop such things and knows how to make them work!

I did another drawing earlier in the day and Kyle and I figured out it was my “tv guide” thingy I do for our starting to watch the animated series Voltron LOL!

Voltron: Legendary Defender | Official Trailer [HD] | Netflix

12 Jan 2018 – This drawing ended up having a lot of components of the first episode of the Netflix animated series Voltron. When I looked up 1429 a lot of things came up – Joan of Arc and it being the radio frequency.   What’s funny is we got to about 14 min and 29 seconds of watching the first episode of Voltron too LOL. 

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/joan-of-arc-relieves-orleans

1429

Joan of Arc relieves Orleans

During the Hundred Years’ War, the 17-year-old French peasant Joan of Arc leads a French force in relieving the city of Orleans, besieged by the English since October.

At the age of 16, “voices” of Christian saints told Joan to aid Charles, the French dauphin, in gaining the French throne and expelling the English from France. Convinced of the validity of her divine mission, Charles furnished Joan with a small force of troops. She led her troops to Orleans, and on April 29, as a French sortie distracted the English troops on the west side of the city, Joan entered unopposed by its eastern gate. Bringing needed supplies and troops into the besieged city, she also inspired the French to a passionate resistance and through the next week led the charge during a number of skirmishes and battles. On one occasion, she was even hit by an arrow, but after dressing her wounds she returned to the battle. On May 8, the siege of Orleans was broken, and the English retreated.

During the next five weeks, Joan led French forces into a number of stunning victories over the English, and Reims, the traditional city of coronation, was captured in July. Later that month, Charles VII was crowned king of France, with Joan of Arc kneeling at his feet.

In May 1430, while leading another military expedition against the English occupiers of France, Bourguignon soldiers captured Joan and sold her to the English, who tried her for heresy. She was tried as a heretic and witch, convicted, and on May 30, 1431, burned at the stake at Rouen. In 1920, Joan of Arc, already one of the great heroes of French history, was recognized as a Christian saint by the Roman Catholic Church.

http://www.fordyce.org/scanning/scanning_info/spectrum.htm this is interesting to me.  When the numbers 1429 came up in the drawing, I thought of sound frequencies, sonar, echo’s, trying to locate someone or something.  I thought of the weird whale-like/musical sounds being recorded around the world.  It also brought back fond memories of me being a teenager and using my blue am/fm radio to try and tune in to stations in London – the BBC!  This was during a time when I was heavy into my fandom of David Bowie and other European artists:

The Radio Spectrum

This is an approximate look, to help in searching frequencies on a scanner or shortwave radio. Just be aware, having the right frequency may not be enough, in tuning to a certain frequency. The time of day, atmospheric conditions, location, mode you’re in (AM, SSB, Narrowband FM, Wideband FM, etc.), and your equipment, are also equally important. You’ll find most transmissions are broadcasted in Narrow- band FM. Some main exceptions are shortwave (AM & SSB), commercial AM radio (AM), commercial FM radio (Wideband FM), television (Wideband FM), citizens band radio (AM & SSB), aeronautical communications (mostly AM), and some military VHF/UHF (Wideband FM). Most all scanners will pick a default mode for you, depending on what frequency band you are in. But many scanners also let you manually switch between modes (AM, FM, etc.) and frequency search spacing (5 khz, 12.5 khz, etc.) if the default modes are not correct. Happy Listening!!!

FREQUENCY                    USES/SERVICES
(in Megahertz unless
otherwise indicated)


10 - 150 khz                Military/government, submarine communications
(.01 - .15 MHz)

150 - 535 khz               Longwave Band, beacons, foreign broadcasts, maritime.
(.15 - .535 MHz)

535 - 1700 khz              Your standard AM radio dial.
(.535 - 1.7 MHz)

1.7 - 30                    Shortwave/High Frequency Band.  Broadcasting, two-way 
                            government, military and commercial communications, 
                            amateur radio, CB radio (approx. 27 MHz), others.
                            
                               Shortwave
                               Approx. Range          Meter Band
	                           1.8 - 2.0                  160*
	                           2.3 - 2.495                120
	                           3.2 - 3.4                  90
	                           3.5 - 4.0                  80*
	                           3.9 - 4.0                  75
	                           4.75 - 5.06                60
	                           5.9 - 6.2                  49
	                           7.0 - 7.3                  40*
	                           7.1 - 7.35                 41
	                           9.4 - 9.9                  31
	                           10.1 - 10.15               30*
	                           11.6 - 12.1                25
	                           13.57 - 13.87              22
	                           14.0 - 14.35               20*
	                           15.1 - 15.8                19
	                           18.068 - 18.168            17*
	                           17.48 - 17.9               16
	                           18.9 - 19.02               15
	                           21.0 - 21.45               15*
	                           21.45 - 21.75              13
	                           24.89 - 24.99              12*
	                           25.6 - 26.1                11
	                           28.0 - 29.7                10*
	                           
	(In general, the lower shortwave frequencies  are received 
	better during the night, while higher frequencies are received better during the 
	day.  There are also some amateur radio bands between many of these 
	shortwave bands(*).  Consult a shortwave guide for more detailed information.)

30 - 50                     Very High Frequency Band.  Government, business, 
                            walkie-talkies.  Also, cordless phones and 'baby monitors' 
                            found about 46 - 49 MHz.

50 - 54                    	Amateur radio 6 meter band.

54 - 72                    	TV Channels 2-4.
                           	
	                        Channel 2 Audio (Wideband FM) 59.75
                           	Channel 3 Audio (Wideband FM) 65.75
                           	Channel 4 Audio (Wideband FM) 71.75

72 - 76                    	Manufacturing, remote control, eavesdropping bugs, etc.

76 - 88                    	TV Channels 5-6.

                           	Channel 5 Audio (Wideband FM) 81.75
                           	Channel 6 Audio (Wideband FM) 87.75

88 - 108                   	Your standard FM radio dial.

108 - 136                  	Aeronautical communications (AM).

136 - 138                  	Satellites.

138 - 144                  	Military communications.

144 - 148                  	Amateur radio 2 meter band.

148 - 150.8                	Military use.

150.8 - 174                	Business, highway, law enforcement, government weather, 
                            maritime.

174 - 216                  	TV Channels 7-13.

                           	Channel 7 Audio (Wideband FM) 179.75
                           	Channel 8 Audio (Wideband FM) 185.75
                           	Channel 9 Audio (Wideband FM) 191.75
                           	Channel 10 Audio (Wideband FM) 197.75
                           	Channel 11 Audio (Wideband FM) 203.75
                           	Channel 12 Audio (Wideband FM) 209.75
                           	Channel 13 Audio (Wideband FM) 215.75

216 - 220                  	Maritime and aeronautical.

220 - 222                  	Land mobile communications.

222 - 225                  	Amateur radio.

225 - 400                  	Military aviation and space.

400 - 406                  	Military and government.

406 - 420                  	U.S. Government.

420 - 450                  	Amateur radio.

450 - 470                  	Ultra High Frequency Band.  Business, industry, military, 
                            fire, local government.

470 - 512                  	TV Channels 14-20, shared with law enforcement.

512 - 825                 	TV Channels 21-69, others.

825 - 849                  	Cellular telephones (receivers/handsets).

849 - 851                  	Aeronautical telephones (ground-based towers).

851 - 866                  	Business, public safety, trunked systems.

866 - 869                  	Public safety, law enforcement, trunked systems.

869 - 894                  	Cellular telephones (towers).

                            Note: Even though listening to cellular telephone calls 
                            is technically illegal in the United States, one will 
                            usually do better listening to calls on the tower frequencies, 
                            as opposed to the handset frequencies.  This is because most 
                            cellular phones transmit less than one-watt of output.  So 
                            unless the cellular phone is very close to you, you will have 
                            much more luck scanning the more powerful towers, which 
                            transmit/receive for each cell site.

894 - 896                  	Aeronautical telephones (handsets).

                            Note: In scanning airplane telephones, you will usually do 
                            better listening to the handset frequencies, instead of the 
                            tower frequencies, unless you are very near a ground 
                            transmitter. But, in any event, call traffic heard on handset 
                            frequencies is very scant.

896 - 901                  	Private land mobile units.

902 - 928                  	Land mobile, amateur radio, personal communication units, 
                            cordless telephones.

928 - 932                  	Radio paging.

935 - 940                  	Business radio.

941 - 944                  	Government and non-government fixed services.

944 - 952                  	Broadcasters' studio-to-transmitter links.

952 - 960                  	Private fixed services, paging.

960 - 1240                 	Aeronautical navigation.

1240 - 1300                	Amateur radio.

1300 - 1350               	Aeronautical navigation.

1350 - 1400                	Radio location.

1400 - 1427                	Radio astronomy.

1427 - 1429                	Point-to-point, mobile, space.

1429 - 1660.5              	Various satellite transmission uses.

1660.5 - 1668.4            	Radio astronomy.

1668.4 - 1700              	Meteorological aids.

1700 - 1850                	Meteorological satellites, U.S. Government.

1850 - 1990                	Fixed point-to-point, microwave.

1990 - 2110                	Broadcast studio-to-transmitter links.

Strange Trumpet Sounds In The Sky (2016-2017)  – not sure what to make of this.  What came to mind is like someone placing a call to an entire planet.  It sounds like whales to me – like sonar or echo location.  Very interesting.

Published on Mar 13, 2017

All over the world, people are recording extremely loud sounds coming from the sky. In many instances, these distinctive noises, sound like someone is blowing a trumpet. How are we supposed to interpret these “apocalyptic” sounds? Should we be concerned? What is very clear, is that this is truly , a global phenomenon.

11 Jan 2018 Dream about ice dimension and increase in unexplained phenomenon being recorded

Dream about riding a special automated flying bicycle through woods. Then it was winter. There was thawing, warmth and city life things going on. As I sat by a frozen lakes edge that was melting, I saw thin layer of clear ice suspended in the sky. I poked it with a stick and actually broke through it like a dimensional hole. When I walked through the hole I made, the other side was completely frozen! There was no sun, no thawing, just endless and solid ice! The “thawing” city was an illusion.

*This is probably just my mind trying to understand the weather lately. I was reading from Walden again which for some reason tends to be a trigger or key to nature themed dreams for me.

10 Jan 2018 Jackie Wygant random thoughts drawing Alvarado TX

I did one of my random drawings yesterday afternoon. It appears to be yet another “tv guide” for this video we would watch this morning while eating breakfast!

5 UNEXPLAINED MYSTERIES in the Sky Caught on Camera

Nuke’s Top 5

Published on Jun 9, 2017

Top 5 unexplained mysteries and strange phenomenon in the sky ! Very weird and unexplainable events and sightings witnessed by REAL people and caught on camera.

I have a theory about why so many more unexplained things are being recorded or are happening these days.  It’s obvious part of it is due to better technology that is able to actually record things we were previously incapable of recording.  I suspect something else:  Wifi or ambient energy charged particles.  What are we “feeding” with the plethora of energy waves we are making more and more of each day?  Are we making pathways….food for tears in reality and food for previously unseen travelers or residual and intelligent hauntings?  Who needs to suck on batteries when you have cell phones and so much more to feed on!  Ghost hunters know about drained batteries.  Kyle and I have experienced on more than one occasion having batteries to devices be completely drained.   It takes energy to “manifest” in reality and we are generating oodles of it!  Who are what are we allowing access to our realities?

Bizarre I know, but that’s just what has come to mind about this lately.  There are so many more ambient energy waves than their used to be just floating all around us.  Are they charging the particles they encounter?  I’ve come to believe we are living in an “energy soup” and everyone and everything that has come before us and is with us now leaves parts of themselves in the atmosphere we all eat, drink and breathe – dander, hair, skin cells, pollen….dust.   Literally everything is energy.  Just a thought.

Strange and unexplainable things have been happening for a very long time.  I have a whole disk of orb pictures I took when I lived in Colorado many years ago.  Some were just dust particles illuminated by the flash, some were tiny bugs captured by light in plants and some I can’t explain.  What’s the most energy efficient shape in which to travel…probably a circle like an orb.  Our technological capabilities have vastly improved from those times.  The energetic “noise” we make now with all these gadgets is much more so than in ages past.

This is a picture I took of May back in 2001 when we lived in base housing at Peterson AFB CO. She seems to be looking at an orb of “something” on the ceiling right above her. Was it a bug? Dust? Something else?

The other thought that comes to mind with regards to the possibility of extraterrestrial visitors, is that they have always been here!  We are now just getting more capable technologies that actually allow us to see them.  If I were an alien trying to make contact with what could be perceived as a very hostile species (humans) I wouldn’t land on the White House front lawn!   I would use stealth technologies and diversionary tactics so there would always be a question as to what was actually being seen.  I guess I get my notes from Gene Roddenberry’s Prime Directive in Star Trek:

Prime Directive. In the fictional universe of Star Trek, the Prime Directive is a guiding principle of the United Federation of Planets prohibiting the protagonists from interfering with the internal development of alien civilizations. The Prime Directive has been used in five of the six Star Trek-based series.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime_Directive

10 Jan 2018 Chalk drawings, Memory Wire and Urban Sprawl

9 Jan 2018- First outdoor chalk drawing yesterday. This almost has an anime feel to it. I was thinking of a spiritual journey to the sun.

9 Jan 2018 – My first Memory Wire bracelet. I decided to try it instead of stretchy cord and I really like it. As I made it I was thinking about the journey of existence. There is Blood, Worlds colliding, Creation, Chakras, Rainbows…all sorts of stuff going on.  The bracelet is very comfortable to wear.  Many years ago my Mom gave me a Memory Wire bead bracelet she had a friend make for me.  Wearing it all makes me feel like Wonder Woman and her Lasso of Truth lol.  Now I have one for each wrist!

9 Jan 2018 – last drawing of the day. Very spiritual feeling to it. More than just a cross.

Hello to you.  It’s Wednesday morning, 7:59 am as I begin to write to you.  I’m sharing some of my creations from yesterday.  Since I’ve nearly maxed out my picture space here again and haven’t decided whether or not I want to buy a professional account, it’s always a nail-biter to see if all I want to share with you will even load up!  Today was a success!

Last night was interesting.  Around 5:59 pm we heard two loud booms that scared us and the dogs.  It sounded like bombs going off.  There was discussion on Next Door (neighborhood internet page) but no definitive answers.  It’s kind of like when we had the 4.0 earthquake a couple of years ago now.  You can’t prepare yourself for those types of sounds and feelings!  Hopefully it wasn’t anything bad.

Our little town is growing much faster than I think anyone thought it would.  Things that used to be o.k. aren’t o.k. anymore in the noise department with more people living in the city proper.  The gap between the folks living on the outer edge of our town and those of us living within it city limits is closing.  A phenomenon I’ve explored here before about this is called Urban Sprawl.  What happens is people will move away from large cities to get away from the chaos and then they tell two friends and they tell two friends and before you know it, they are right in the same situation they left!  When people from large cities move to small ones, they want all the amenities they had but also want peace and quiet….no traffic.  It doesn’t work that way.  Where you go, there you are….I give you Urban Sprawl!

http://www.everythingconnects.org/urban-sprawl.html

Urban sprawl refers to the expansion of poorly planned, low-density, auto-dependent development, which spreads out over large amounts of land, putting long distances between homes, stores, and work and creating a high segregation between residential and commercial uses with harmful impacts on the people living in these areas and the ecosystems and wildlife that have been displaced. Although some would argue that urban sprawl has its benefits, such as creating local economic growth, urban sprawl has many negative consequences for residents and the environment, such as higher water and air pollution, increased traffic fatalities and jams, loss of agricultural capacity, increased car dependency, higher taxes, increased runoff into rivers and lakes, harmful effects on human health, including higher rates of obesity, high blood pressure, hypertension and chronic diseases, increased flooding, decrease in social capital and loss of natural habitats, wildlife and open space. In its path, urban sprawl consumes immeasurable acres of forests, farmland, woodlands and wetlands and in its wake, leaves vacant storefronts, boarded up houses, closed businesses, abandoned and usually contaminated industrial sites, and traffic congestion, which can stretch miles from urban centers and is creating a hidden debt of unfunded infrastructure and services, urban decay, social dysfunction, and environmental degradation.

America’s Biggest Problem   –  well worth spending 14 minutes to watch this!

Published on Jul 20, 2015

Watch the new video, Agoraphobic Nation: Sprawl and Culture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DH60a…
Most of the problems that we face today in the United States, whether they are cultural, economic, social or environmental are rooted in poor urban design and planning. Due to America’s unique experience of economic growth during the 20th century, this has become the most underrated issue in the United States that most people don’t know about. People react to their immediate environment and don’t see the big picture unless they can step outside and view themselves. It’s important to recognize a problem in order to have the capacity to change it.
Some points at the end were inspired by a lecture by Andres Duany: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMvwHDFVpCE

5 Jan 2018 Hope rising (chalk drawing) 2006 Poem and missing You tube videos (This video contains content from SME, who has blocked it in your country on copyright grounds)

4 Jan 2018 – A being with a fragment of rainbow inside of them, Hope, trying to rise in a very difficult world.

Hello to you.  It’s 8:40 am as I write to you on this sunny Friday morning.  How are you?  I hope you are well.  I haven’t seen any news this morning so the Hope for having a nice day in me rises unimpeded!

I have about maxed out my picture room on here again, so I’m faced with some decisions.  Either pay for the business account or delete a bunch of stuff.    So if you visit an older post and pictures are missing, you know why.  I’ve noticed recently that a bunch of the videos I’ve shared here from You tube have been disappearing.  One in particular was a Robert Hazard’s music video, Escalator of Life!   The reason that showed up was: “This video contains content from SME, who has blocked it in your country on copyright grounds.”  So if you visit a post and a video is missing, that’s why.  Guess they are starting to “clean house.”

28 June 2006 by Jackie

Before me the road is cleared of trees and any vision of the past

The view out of me is blank and clear

Behind me lies the wreckage twisted and sharp

Painful to touch, painful to feel it brings tears easily to my eyes

Sometimes these new days are so bright I am blinded in my happiness

I find at times I cannot believe what unfolds can be real and true

Can these blessings really be for me in all that I have been?

I spread my arms wide and the rain falls

I lift my head to the heavens and sun shines

I kneel down and the earth trembles

I look around me and the walls fall down

All is laid bare and new; the earth scoured clean the lion roars

From behind the curtain of uncertainty the doors of eternity open

Before me now the shadow passes and light is left in it’s wake

The White Tree shimmers in the dew slipped dawn

There are no leaves just shimmering silver

A new Hope for a new time……..

 

4 Jan 2018 – chalk drawing and meditation from yesterday morning. I don’t know why I keep thinking someone is trapped underneath the pyramids lol. That’s what this is about to include the stuff on the right. Just my imagination run amok probably.

4 Jan 2018 Strange things, Blue Moon (drawings), Digital Dark Age and Myths and Monsters (Netflix)

3 Jan 2018 – I know this is a strange drawing. As I’ve mentioned before with how things work for me when I’m drawing – I just draw. The numbers were just what I heard in my head.  A year or so ago now I had a very vivid dream that involved gray aliens.  More than one of them was standing around me.  I can remember asking them “What are you doing to my face?!”  When I saw my face in the dream, it was half human and half alien.  Every time they were around in the dream after that I couldn’t see them but Spot would start barking at seemingly nothing.  I don’t have a bad feeling about them at all.

3 Jan 2018 – I’m trying to get in the habit of making a “hard copy” of my chalk drawings.  We are systematically, as I’m finding from experience, being erased through digital censorship*see article I shared. Anyhew… as you can see, the translation changes from chalk to paper and pen.

3 Jan 2018 – What came to mind on this one was “station.” I’ve been interested in recent videos I saw of interesting craft appearing around the space station.

3 Jan 2018 – The translation came out to be quite different that what I drew in chalk!

3 Jan 2018 – “Blue moon” – this was the last drawing of yesterday.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/newsscienceandtechnology/scientists-warn-we-may-be-creating-a-digital-dark-age/ar-BBHKb6t?ocid=sfyou may want to consider going a little “old school” on things about your life that you want preserved for posterity or risk being “erased.”  I’ve already started running into format issues when trying to open documents I saved on CD’s several years ago.  If it’s important to you, you might want to make a real hard copy of it.  I still keep hard copy journals etc. 

Adam Wernick, Science Friday

Scientists warn we may be creating a ‘digital dark age’

You may think that those photos on Facebook or all your tweets may last forever, or might even come back to haunt you, depending on what you have out there. But, in reality, much of our digital information is at risk of disappearing in the future.

Unlike in previous decades, no physical record exists these days for much of the digital material we own. Your old CDs, for example, will not last more than a couple of decades. This worries archivists and archaeologists and presents a knotty technological challenge.

“We may [one day] know less about the early 21st century than we do about the early 20th century,” says Rick West, who manages data at Google. “The early 20th century is still largely based on things like paper and film formats that are still accessible to a large extent; whereas, much of what we’re doing now — the things we’re putting into the cloud, our digital content — is born digital. It’s not something that we translated from an analog container into a digital container, but, in fact, it is born, and now increasingly dies, as digital content, without any kind of analog counterpart.”

Computer and data specialists refer to this era of lost data as the “digital dark ages.” Other experts call the 21st century an “informational black hole,” because the digital information we are creating right now may not be readable by machines and software programs of the future. All that data, they worry — our century’s digital history — is at risk of never being recoverable.

Surprisingly, many of the world’s largest companies and data-based enterprises still rely on an old storage medium: magnetic tape. In 1952, IBM introduced the first magnetic tape data storage system, ushering in the modern era of electronic computing. An early tape unit could hold about 2.3 megabytes per reel on two tapes.

The medium has come a long way, says Lauren Young, Science Friday’s web producer and the lead reporter on a three-part series called “File Not Found,” which explores issues of data storage (and loss) of all kinds. A single cartridge of today’s magnetic tape can hold hundreds of terabytes of data, the equivalent to hundreds of millions of books, Young says. “This past summer, IBM increased the amount a cartridge can hold to 330 terabytes, which is 330,000 gigabytes per cartridge. Big companies like Google and particle physics labs like Fermilab all have massive libraries of tape with thousands and thousands of cartridges.”

While most companies use digital technologies for first-line storage, in many cases, magnetic tape is the backup to the backup. This, too, can present problems, in the form of evolving magnetic formats and a phenomenon known as “bit rot.” Over time, the digital information on tape, and in other digital formats, can decay or degrade if it is not stored properly or is subjected to other adverse conditions.

Kari Kraus, an associate professor in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland in College Park and who helps run a project that rescues and resurrects digital relics, including video games and virtual worlds, knows about bit rot, and its close relative “software rot,” in which old files, games and other data becomes unusable because no format exists to read and reproduce the information.

“Different storage media have different lifespans,” Kraus says. “In our project, we worked a lot with magnetic media like floppy disks and those only have a lifespan of, say, 10 to 14 years. Optical media like DVDs and CD-ROM, I believe have even less. It is going to be a problem across different storage media.”

IBM 729: The IBM 729 Magnetic Tape Unit was IBM's iconic tape mass storage system from the late 1950s through the mid-1960s.© Credit: Wikimedia Commons The IBM 729 Magnetic Tape Unit was IBM’s iconic tape mass storage system from the late 1950s through the mid-1960s.

Lauren Young says some researchers see hope in one of the newest technologies: DNA storage. “Basically, researchers have found a way to store data onto DNA, which is a billion-year-old molecule that can store the essence of life,” Young explains. “It’s pretty incredible that they can do that. It’s all synthetically made; it’s not genomic DNA.”

In this case, storage capacity is measured in petabytes; that is, millions of gigabytes. Science Magazine writes: “A single gram of DNA could, in principle, store every bit of datum ever recorded by humans in a container about the size and weight of a couple of pickup trucks.”

Kari Kraus understands the urgency but says she cannot make up her mind whether the phrase, digital dark ages, is overblown or not. “We have architectural ruins; we have paintings in tatters. The past always survives in fragments already,” she says. “I guess I tend to see preservation as not a binary — either it’s preserved or it’s not. There are gradations of preservation. We can often preserve parts of a larger whole.”

Related video: Twitter is too big for the Library of Congress to archive (provided by Newsy)

We started watching this on Netflix – very interesting.  The art/graphics with it are amazing:

Myths & Monsters – Trailer – Netflix [HD]

Published on Dec 2, 2017

Myths and Monsters takes its audience on a journey through the mythic landscape of Europe, revealing the origins of the most famous legends this continent has produced and exploring why they have endured so long.

A 3DD Production for Netflix.
Presented by Nicholas Day

Directed by Daniel Kontur
Written by William Simpson

Produced by Daniel Kontur, William Simpson

Executive Producers – Dominic Saville, Patricia Hickey, Cal Seville

Cinematography by Pablo Rojo
Edited by Ashley Hall
Music by Murat Evgin

Animations by ODD Budapest.

 

1 Jan 2018 A glimpse of light and classic reads (The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins 1859)

Hello to you.  It’s 7:06 am on this first day of 2018.  It was quiet last night for a change.  People actually obeyed the city ordinance  of no fireworks in city limits for a change, which we as dog owners and early to bed types appreciated!

This morning when I went to shake out a rug I looked up and there were white twinkling lights I hadn’t seen in a long time!  Stars!  ZOMG!  I went to the back and caught a glimpse of something else lovely I haven’t seen in a long time, a sunrise!  I just went out back to take a peek and there were mauve clouds!  So beautiful!  We’ve had a gray lid on top of us for about two weeks now.  To see the stars, a sunrise….natures lights….what a blessing!

Light in the Gray poem by Jackie Wygant 1 Jan 2018

It has been gray and dreary

The air cold and biting

Far from holiday cheery

But this morning,  in the distance I saw a twinkling white light

A shimmering star against a velvet blue

Twinkling bright

A gift for year that begins anew

Perhaps a glistening sign

Of peace for me….peace for you.

 

I downloaded several classic stories to my Kindle yesterday to include this one and I’m really enjoying it:

The Woman in White https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Woman_in_White_(novel)

The Woman in White (novel)

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The Woman in White
The Woman In White - Cover.jpg

Cover of first US edition
Author Wilkie Collins
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre Mystery novel, Sensation novel
Publisher All the Year Round

×

Publication date
26 November 1859 – 25 August 1860
OCLC 41545143
Preceded by The Dead Secret
Followed by No Name

The Woman in White is Wilkie Collins‘ fifth published novel, written in 1859. It is considered to be among the first mystery novels and is widely regarded as one of the first (and finest) in the genre of “sensation novels“.

The story is sometimes considered an early example of detective fiction with protagonist Walter Hartright employing many of the sleuthing techniques of later private detectives. The use of multiple narrators (including nearly all the principal characters) draws on Collins’s legal training,[1][2] and as he points out in his Preamble: “the story here presented will be told by more than one pen, as the story of an offence against the laws is told in Court by more than one witness”. In 2003, Robert McCrum writing for The Observer listed The Woman in White number 23 in “the top 100 greatest novels of all time”,[3] and the novel was listed at number 77 on the BBC‘s survey The Big Read.[4]

Characters[edit]

  • Walter Hartright – A young teacher of drawing, something of an everyman character, and distinguished by a strong sense of justice.
  • Frederick Fairlie – A wealthy hypochondriac land-owner: the uncle of Laura Fairlie, distinguished principally by his mock-politeness toward all other characters.
  • Laura Fairlie – Mr. Fairlie’s gentle, guileless, pretty niece: an heiress and orphan.
  • Marian Halcombe – Laura’s elder half-sister and companion; not attractive but intelligent and resourceful. She is described as one “of the finest creations in all Victorian fiction” by John Sutherland.[5]
  • Anne Catherick (“The Woman in White”) – An eccentric young woman distinguished by her insistence on white clothes; an illegitimate daughter of Laura’s father.
  • Jane Catherick – Anne’s unsympathetic mother; in league with Sir Percival Glyde in committing her daughter to the asylum. Depicted as an unpleasant character.
  • Vincent Gilmore – Lawyer to the Fairlies and close friend.
  • Sir Percival Glyde, Baronet – Laura’s fiancé and then husband; able to appear charming and gracious when he wishes but often abrasive.
  • Count Fosco – Sir Percival’s closest friend; his full name is Isidor Ottavio Baldassare Fosco. A grossly obese Italian with a mysterious past: eccentric, bombastic, urbane but intelligent and menacing. He keeps canaries and mice as pets. The Count greatly admires Marian for her intellect, so much so that he is willing to compromise several weak points in his plan (such as allowing Marian to retrieve Laura from the asylum) for her sake.
  • Countess Fosco – Laura’s aunt: once a giddy girl but now humourless and in near-unbroken obedience to her husband.
  • Professor Pesca – A teacher of Italian and good friend of Walter. The professor finds Walter the Limmeridge job, introducing him to Laura and Marian and proves to be Fosco’s unexpected nemesis.

Plot[edit]

Walter Hartright, a young art teacher, encounters and gives directions to a mysterious and distressed woman dressed entirely in white, lost in London; he is later informed by policemen that she has escaped from an asylum. Soon afterward, he travels to Limmeridge House in Cumberland, having been hired as a drawing master on the recommendation of his friend, Pesca, an Italian language master. The Limmeridge household comprises the invalid Frederick Fairlie, and Walter’s students: Laura Fairlie, Mr. Fairlie’s niece, and Marian Halcombe, her devoted half-sister. Walter realizes that Laura bears an astonishing resemblance to the woman in white, who is known to the household by the name of Anne Catherick: a mentally disabled child who formerly lived near Limmeridge, and was devoted to Laura’s mother, who first dressed her in white.

Over the next few months, Walter and Laura fall in love, despite Laura’s betrothal to Sir Percival Glyde, Baronet. Upon realizing this, Marian advises Walter to leave Limmeridge. Laura receives an anonymous letter warning her against marrying Glyde. Walter deduces that Anne has sent the letter and encounters her again in Cumberland; he becomes convinced that Glyde originally placed Anne in the asylum. Despite the misgivings of the family lawyer over the financial terms of the marriage settlement, which will give the entirety of Laura’s fortune to Glyde if she dies without leaving an heir, and Laura’s confession that she loves another man, Laura and Glyde marry in December 1849 and travel to Italy for six months. Concurrently, Walter joins an expedition to Honduras.

After six months, Sir Percival and Lady Glyde return to his house, Blackwater Park in Hampshire; accompanied by Glyde’s friend, Count Fosco (married to Laura’s aunt). Marian, at Laura’s request, resides at Blackwater and learns that Glyde is in financial difficulties. Glyde attempts to bully Laura into signing a document that would allow him to use her marriage settlement of £20,000, which Laura refuses. Anne, who is now terminally ill, travels to Blackwater Park and contacts Laura, saying that she holds a secret that will ruin Glyde’s life. Before she can disclose the secret, Glyde discovers their communication and becomes extremely paranoid, believing Laura knows his secret and attempts to keep her held at Blackwater. With the problem of Laura’s refusal to give away her fortune and Anne’s knowledge of his secret, Fosco conspires to use the resemblance between Laura and Anne to exchange their two identities. The two will trick both individuals into traveling with them to London; Laura will be placed in an asylum under the identity of Anne, and Anne will be buried under the identity of Laura upon her imminent death. Marian overhears part of this plan but becomes soaked by rain, and contracts typhus.

While Marian is ill, Laura is tricked into traveling to London, and the plan is accomplished. Anne Catherick succumbs to her illness and is buried as Laura, while Laura is drugged and conveyed to the asylum as Anne. When Marian visits the asylum, hoping to learn something from Anne, she finds Laura, who is dismissed as a deluded Anne when she claims to be Laura. Marian bribes the nurse, and Laura escapes. Walter has meanwhile returned from Honduras, and the three live incognito in London, formulating plans to restore Laura’s identity. During his research, Walter discovers Glyde’s secret; he was illegitimate, and therefore not entitled to inherit his title or property. In the belief that Walter has discovered or will discover his secret, Glyde attempts to incinerate the incriminating documents; but perishes in the flames. From Anne’s mother (Jane Catherick), Walter discovers that Anne never knew what Glyde’s secret was. She had only known that there was a secret around Glyde and had repeated words her mother had said in anger to threaten Glyde and then later got the idea into her head that she knew the secret. The reason that Glyde’s parents never got married was that his mother was already married to an Irish man, who left her. While he had no problem claiming the estate, he needed a marriage certificate between his parents to borrow money. So he went to a church in a village, where his parents had lived together and where the pastor, that had service there had died a long ago, and added a fake marriage into their church register. Mrs. Catherick had helped him getting access to the register and was awarded a golden watch with chain and an annual payment.

With the death of Glyde, the trio is safe from persecution, but still, have no way of proving Laura’s true identity. Walter suspects that Anne died before Laura’s trip to London, and proof of this would prove their story, but only Fosco holds knowledge of the dates. Walter figures out from a letter he got from Mrs. Catherick’s former employer, that Anne was the illegitimate child of Laura’s father. On a visit to the Opera with Pesca, he learns that Fosco has betrayed an Italian nationalist society, of which Pesca is a high-ranking member. When Fosco prepares to flee the country, Walter forces a written confession from him, by which Laura’s identity is legally restored, in exchange for a safe-conduct from England. Laura’s identity is restored and the inscription on her gravestone replaced by that of Anne Catherick. Fosco escapes, only to be killed by another agent of the society. To ensure the legitimacy of his efforts on her part, Walter and Laura have married earlier; and on the death of Frederick Fairlie, their son inherits Limmeridge.

Themes and influences[edit]

The theme of the story is the unequal position of married women in law at the time. Laura Glyde’s interests have been neglected by her uncle and her fortune of £20,000 (then an enormous sum of money) by default falls to her husband on her death. This provides the motive for the conspiracy of her unscrupulous husband and his co-conspirator Fosco. In his later Man and Wife, Collins portrays another victim of the law’s partiality, who takes a terrible revenge on her husband.

Publication[edit]

The novel was first published in serial form in 1859–60, appearing in Charles Dickens‘ magazine All the Year Round (UK) and Harper’s Weekly (USA). It was published in book form in 1860.[6]

Critical reception[edit]

The novel was extremely successful commercially, but contemporary critics were generally hostile.[6] Modern critics and readers regard it as Collins’ best novel:[6] a view with which Collins concurred, as it is the only one of his novels named in his chosen epitaph: “Author of The Woman in White and other works of fiction”.[7]

Adaptations[edit]

Theatre[edit]

Film and television[edit]

Literature[edit]

Computer games[edit]

  • “Victorian Mysteries: Woman in White” created by FreezeTag Games (2010)

References[edit]

  1. Jump up ^ Wilkie Collins (26 November 1887). “How I Write my Books”. The Globe. 
  2. Jump up ^ “Mr Wilkie Collins in Gloucester Place”. Number 81 in ‘Celebrities at Home’, The World. 26 December 1877. 
  3. Jump up ^ McCrum, Robert (12 October 2003). “100 greatest novels of all time”. London: Guardian. Retrieved 27 October 2012. 
  4. Jump up ^ “BBC – The Big Read”. BBC. April 2003, Retrieved 18 October 2012
  5. Jump up ^ The Woman in White, notes by John Sutherland, ISBN 0-19-283429-0
  6. ^ Jump up to: a b c Symons, Julian (1974). Introduction to “The Woman in White”,. Penguin. 
  7. Jump up ^ Peters, Catherine (1993). The King of Inventors. Princeton University Press. 
  8. Jump up ^ “The Woman in White”. Samuel French Ltd. Retrieved 2 October 2012.

The Woman in White – Original Theatrical Trailer

29 Dec 2017 Before Bed Drawing and The Flash (Season 3)

29 Dec 2017 – One of my “before bed” drawings. A lot going on in this one! Like I mentioned before. When I draw I don’t usually have an idea before I start. I just draw and sometimes what comes is kind of strange lol!

Hello to you.  It’s Friday morning, 7:14 am as I start to write to you.  Hope this finds you well wherever and whenever you are at this moment.  It’s still cold and overcast here after many days.  Thank goodness for my sun lamp!

Last night we finished Season 3 of The Flash (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3107288/?ref_=nv_sr_1) and talk about some twists!  We were both crying at the end!  We think Grant Gustin is an awesome Flash (wish they used him in the movies too) and really enjoy the chemistry between all of the characters this season.   Barry (Grant Gustin)  and Iris (Candice Patton) are just beautiful together.  It was so fun they added actor Tom Felton of the Harry Potter verse to the cast.

A Mark Twain quote I hadn’t remembered seeing before came up in this final episode and I liked it so much I wrote it in my Pink Spirit book.

“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” —Mark Twain.

Heard the song Runnin Home to You from episode 17  in my head as I was waking up this morning.  We really enjoyed this episode because it was about the power of love!  I also enjoyed it because it was a small Glee cast reunion!  The Music Meister was Darren Criss (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2023050/?ref_=tt_cl_t14) …miss that show!

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5668430/?ref_=ttep_ep17

Storyline

Barry and team are surprised when Mon-El and Hank Henshaw arrive on their Earth carrying a comatose Supergirl who was whammied by the Music Meister. Unable to wake her up, they turn to Team Flash to save her. However, the Music Meister surprises The Flash and puts him in a similar coma, one that Team Flash can’t cure. Kara and Barry wake up without their powers in an alternate reality where life is like a musical and the only way to escape is by following the script, complete with singing and dancing, to the end.

The Flash 3×17 Barry & Iris “Runnin’ Home To You”

Published on Mar 21, 2017

Flash 3×17 Supergirl Crossover, Song #5 Musical Episode

28 Dec 2017 Timelessness (drawing and poem) and Maksim/Royal Philharmonic Orchestra/Julian Kershaw-Somewhere in Time/The Old Woman (from Somewhere in Time)”

Timelessness by Jackie Wygant

Woven thread of blood, flesh and light

Through the particles of creation

You shine bright.

A flicker, a flash, a leaf on the wind

Where you end

I begin.

Here there is no marking a passage, just flowing through

This space to that space

Is how I always find you.

 

Maksim – Somewhere in Time (one of my favorite movies that I can’t watch often – just wrecks me lol!)