5 July 2018 Milk Glass Vase, Watching a Different Sort of Darren Criss, The Practice of Walking (Daily Good)

Hello to you.  Just a quick visit.  I’m really tired.  I haven’t had much sleep the past couple of days.  We had a really nice visit with Kyle’s family yesterday and that of course included lots of furry people too.  It was just nice to get caught up as we hadn’t seen each other in several months.  They understood that it was best to steer clear of us until my cycle was over.  So we had burgers and chicken from the grill, some potato and macaroni salads, the blueberry pie Beth made from scratch and my chocolate pudding pie.  We played  a round of Yahtzee and Kyle and his Dad were the only ones to actually roll Yahtzee’s lol!  There were far too many zero’s on my score sheet but it was so fun to play together.  I like the sound of the dice in the cup when you shake it for your roll lol!  I like my dice shaken but not stirred lool!

What is Yahtzee?

Yahtzee

Yahtzee
Yahtzee is a dice game made by Milton Bradley, which was first marketed as Yatzie by the National Association Service of Toledo, Ohio, in the early 1940s. Yatzie was included in a game set called LUCK – 15 Grand Dice Games. It was marketed under the name of Yahtzee by game entrepreneur Edwin S. Lowe in 1956. Lowe is also responsible for introducing Bingo to the U.S. market. The game is a development of earlier dice games such as Poker Dice, Yacht and Generala. It is also similar to Yatzy, which is popular in Scandinavia
This mornings drawing isn’t what I had wrote myself a note to draw.  I was supposed to draw a mermaid for my dear Cindy! I will be sure to do that after I’m rested so she actually looks like a mermaid!  I’m not firing on all cylinders lol!  One of the two milk glass pieces my Aunt Ruth gave me that belonged to my Grandparents made it into things today.  When you think of milk glass do you immediately think about dipping an oreo or something in a glass of milk?  Well there is a type of glass that is actually called Milk glass:

5 July 2018 Milk glass vase that belonged to Grandma and Grandpa Becker Alvarado TX

https://www.countryliving.com/shopping/antiques/g2965/milk-glass-facts/ – a vase like the one I have is actually in this article, valued at about $10.  It’s worth much more in sentimental value of course!
“Opaque Glass originated in 16th century Venice and came in a variety of colors, including white, pink, yellow, blue, and brown. The white variety beloved today rose to prominence during the Victorian era, when 
it was coveted as an economic dead-ringer for porcelain. (The Victorians also get credit for coining the term “milk glass.”) Its production and popularity waned during the Great Depression but saw a resurgence after World War II. Thanks to a frenzy of mass production during the 1950s and 1960s from companies such as Anchor Hocking, Fenton, and Westmoreland, the mid-century finds are readily available today—many for mere milk money. Here are some pretty pieces to add to your own collection.”
—————————————————-
Last night Mom Beth and I stayed up late and watched about half of The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story starring Darren Criss (Blaine from Fox show Glee):https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Assassination_of_Gianni_Versace:_American_Crime_Story

The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story is the second season of the FX true crime anthology television series American Crime Story. The season premiered on January 17, 2018,[1][2] and concluded on March 21, 2018. It consists of a total of 9 episodes,[3] and explores the murder of designer Gianni Versace by spree killer Andrew Cunanan, based on Maureen Orth‘s book Vulgar Favors: Andrew Cunanan, Gianni Versace, and the Largest Failed Manhunt in U.S. History.[2][4]

I normally don’t like to watch television shows with gun violence or based on real stories.  I used to but with the way things have gotten in this country, I don’t need it in my entertainment too.  This said, this was Darren Criss and Beth and I both have an appreciation for him ever since his role as Blaine on Glee.  While it was strangely delightful watching him dance around in a Speedo at one point, it was equally awful watching him murder people and be the kind of human being he was asked to be for this part.  At least they didn’t do the cardinal sin of showing the harming of a dog (physically.)  Ryan Murphy was at the helm of this production.  You could tell.  He knows how to do character development almost too well!  There were times as I was watching that I squirmed, felt a great awkwardness with watching Darren as Andrew being a sociopath and just never telling the truth.  I was physically uncomfortable, cringed and just felt so mortified for the people being portrayed that had once been alive and how Darren Criss’s character Andrew Cunanan destroyed them.

The last I saw of the show last night was the part that brought Beth and I both to tears and it was enough that I don’t know if I could watch anymore of the series.  It’s when he killed the young architect David Madson.  Ryan really put together a sequence for this that just really brought home the message that David was someone’s little boy once and he was dearly loved.   No matter how his Dad felt about David being gay, he loved him more than anything. 

Like I said, I don’t indulge and or relish watching gun violence in most everything now.  When the violent parts happened in the show, I kept saying to Beth, “this is why I like to watch baking and home decorating shows!”  I see someone being hurt, it’s like it’s happening to me.  This said, this scene I am sharing isn’t all about that.  It’s a painfully poignant scene where Andrew is gunning David down and in this process David is transported to one of his most special memories with his Dad.  He realizes he shouldn’t be there again but it brings him peace in the middle of yet another terrifying bit of time with Andrew and just before he dies:

American Crime Story Versace 2×04- Andrew kills David ( Ending Scene)

How do you smudge your soul after channeling someone like Andrew Cunanan?  I see young actors like Darren, Jonathan Rhys Meyers and others who take on these very dark aspects of human nature and I worry about them.  What is the aftercare for their soul after exposing it to such horror?  Even if it is “just pretend?”  I imagine it is probably therapeutic to some degree to be able to “let loose” of the shadow self.  I know when I’m allowed to really yell, scream or release anger I feel better afterwards but how do you bring things back to balance afterwards?  We’ve seen many instances of actors who just couldn’t get back to balance.  It’s very rare that someone can channel such a villain and not implode or explode afterwards.  People like Christopher Lee, Anthony Hopkins, Alan Rickman, Liam Neeson and Mads Mikkelsen don’t come along too often!

It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.
Frederick Douglas

Great article topic from the daily good to share!

http://www.dailygood.org/2018/07/05/the-practice-of-walking/this is one of the most important things in my sanity toolkit.  A 40 min walk is great therapy!

But the beauty is in the walking — we are betrayed by destinations. –Gwyn Thomas

 

The Practice of Walking

–by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee & Hilary Hart, syndicated from heartfulnessmagazine.com, Jul 05, 2018

In the busy-ness of our contemporary life, we are drawn into ceaseless activity that often separates us from the deeper dimension of ourselves. With our smartphones and computer screens, we often remain caught on the surface of our lives amidst the noise and chatter that continually distract us, that stops us from being rooted in our true nature. Unaware we are drowned deeper and deeper in a culture of soulless materialism.

At this time I find it more and more important to have outer activities that can connect us to what is more natural and help us live in relationship to the deep root of our being, and in an awareness of the moment which alone can give real meaning to our everyday existence. Over the years I have developed a number of simple practices that bring together action and a quality of heart-centered attention, or deepening awareness, that can nourish our lives in hidden ways. These activities, like walking, cooking with love and attention, can reconnect us with the web of life, our natural interconnection with life in its beauty and wonder. They can help us ‘declutter’ our outer life and instead become rooted in what is simple and real. One of these practices, which combines action with awareness, is walking.


Walk as if you are kissing
the Earth with your feet.

—Thich Nhat Hanh


I have always loved to walk early in the morning, to sense the Earth at the beginning of a day, to feel Her pulse, Her beauty and magic, before thoughts and demands clutter my day. Waking early, I have a hot cup of tea, meditate in silence, and then, as soon as the first light comes, I walk down the hill to the road beside the wetlands where I live. Sometimes the frost is sparkling around me, sometimes the water is clouded with fog, an egret appearing white against the reeds. This is another time of silent meditation, walking, breathing, feeling the Earth. I try to be as empty as possible, just to be present in the half-light, aware of what is around me. Prayer, meditation, presence, awareness – these are just words for a practice that immerses me in a mystery we call nature. Here the sacred speaks to me in its own language, and I try to listen.

Now I live beside the wetlands, and the tidal water is part of this meeting, this communion. Other times, in other landscapes, it has been rivers and streams, the sounds of waterfowls’ wings, the dawn rising across meadows. Or in forests, a different bird chorus, animals skittering across the path, a deer and her young. Always it is a listening awareness, a deep receptivity to what is around me, an honoring of a world other than people. It is a remembrance of what is essential, elemental, and its nourishment carries me through the day. It is a return to the sacred, sensed and felt, without words or thoughts – a primal consciousness as if of the first day.

This is a practice that has been with me since my teens – when I first started to meditate I also needed to walk. It was not taught or learned, but came as a need, a way to be, an antidote to much of the world around me – a world of people and problems, demands and desires. When one foot follows the other and the day has hardly begun, it seems these demands cannot touch me, as if I am immersed in something simpler, more essential. Placing each foot on the earth is a practice, but a practice that comes from my own roots, not a book or a teacher. Later I came to hear it called “walking in a sacred manner,” and it is sacred, a return to what is sacred. But it also is deeper or more primal than any purpose. Nature speaks to me and I listen. Nature calls and something deep within me responds, and I just need to give it space. I am part of a life far greater than any ‘me’.



The Earth gives us sustenance: the air we breathe, the food we eat. She is generous in so many ways, even as we forget Her and abuse Her. But there is also this deeper nourishment, this invisible, intangible giving. My early morning walk is a communion – if I am receptive, it is a wine drunk deeply. It comes through Her landscape, moss dripping from the trees, white and pink blossoms welcoming spring, the cry of a sea bird. Those first rays of sunrise are always a blessing. I do not understand this with my mind, but my soul feels it, needs it. Once again we are back at the beginning, in that elemental world we never truly leave. Our present culture may have forgotten it, disowned it, covered it over, may pretend we no longer need this communion, but my soul and my feet know otherwise. This is the landscape of the soul as much as it is the wetlands stretching towards the ocean. But it is also any landscape we walk. A walk on city streets is made of the same elements: feet touching ground, the rhythm of walking, breathing, the same sky overhead, the wind touching the face.

I would like to say it is easy, but so often I have to remember to reconnect, to empty the clutter of the coming day from my mind, my everyday thoughts. I have to stay in a place of awareness, sense my feet, feel the air, listen. I have to remember that I am not separate but part of everything around me. I have to push aside this great myth of separation, the great untruth. We are the air we breathe, the earth we touch, the same one life, alive in so many ways. We are the Earth awakening in the early morning, just as we are the buds breaking into color in the spring. To be fully alive is to feel how we are part of this embracing mystery. My morning walk is a remembrance, a reconnection, experienced in the body and felt in the soul.


So often I have to remember to reconnect,
to empty the clutter of the coming day from my mind,
my everyday thoughts.
I have to stay in a place of awareness,
sense my feet, feel the air, listen.
I have to remember that I am not separate
but part of everything around me.


Walking Practice


Walking reinforces our connection to the Earth, one step at a time. Attuning to the rhythms of one’s feet, the swaying of one’s arms, the in and out of breath, the ways walking moves us through time and space, helps develop this relationship, reminding us consciously and unconsciously just how much a part of nature we are. Nature is cyclic and rhythmic, and walking – when we are not focused on where we are going – attunes us to this non-linear reality.

Walking practice is perhaps best begun alone, when the intimacy of nature’s communication can be sensed without distraction. Just as when we meet a lover in the early part of a relationship, we do not want to share that meeting with others. Choose a time when you can be alone, when listening, hearing, and sensing can take place. Perhaps the start or the end of the day, before life’s clamoring takes hold or after it lets go. Lunchtime or an afternoon break from work might be more difficult, but if that is the time available, then make sure the walk is long enough for you to let go of work thoughts or tensions of the day.

Turn off the cell phone, or better yet, leave it at home or the office. There is a way that the vulnerabilities that come with being alive have been squelched by our daily-life safety tools, like cell phones. If you can be without the protection and constant access they provide, try it. Social media will not miss documentation from your walk.

Find a park or a path through quiet woods if you can. Let the rhythm of your steps soothe your mind and create a space for listening. Feel how your feet connect with the earth, how the air moves through your lungs. Follow your attention as it is drawn inward and outward both – to the inner movements of your body and to the feeling of warmth or cold, the sight of birds, the sound of a distant plane. Let your thoughts and impressions move through and out, as part of the natural rhythm of walking. Just as we come back to the breath in silent meditation, return your attention to your feet and their meeting and letting go of the ground.

Commit to walking every day if you can. Walk without expectation, with an attitude of openness and gratitude. If you feel a longing inside you – a need to connect, a desire to be closer to nature – let it motivate and guide you.

The nineteenth-century existential philosopher Søren Kierkegaard once wrote in a letter to his niece, “Every day, I walk myself into a state of well-being and walk away from every illness. I have walked myself into my best thoughts, and I know of no thought so burdensome that one cannot walk away from it.”


Syndicated from Heartfulness MagazineLLEWELLYN VAUGHAN-LEE & HILARY HART explore the contemplative, spiritual value of walking in Nature, and share with us a simple walking practice.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s