2 July 2018 Drawings, Young People Trying to Save the Earth and Nature is Medicine – Even in Prison Cell

If you are curious to read about Felix’s program:

https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/german-12-year-old-boy-plants-1million-trees-takes-over-un-program-to-plant-a-trillion-more/excerpt from John Large article

German 12-Year-old Boy Plants 1Million Trees, Takes Over UN Program to Plant a Trillion More – By John Large 

“The world is a lot greener thanks to this 20-year-old and his army of “climate ambassadors” who have pledged to plant trees and use youth power to avert climate change.

Ever since he was 9 years old, Felix Finkbeiner has been an international figurehead for saving the planet. In 2007, the German youngster founded a global youth movement called “Plant for the Planet” – an initiative that trains and recruits kids from around the world to plant trees as a means of combatting climate change.

Since its creation, the movement has already made significant progress with the help of over 100,000 enthusiastic youth between the ages of 9 and 12—and he planted his one-millionth tree in Germany when he was just twelve. Alongside the Paris Agreement, Finkbeiner’s campaign is a formidable defense of the planet.”

http://www.dailygood.org/story/2012/nature-is-medicine-even-in-a-prison-cell-nalini-nadkarni/

Trees are the earth’s endless effort to speak to the listening heaven.
–Rabindranath Tagore

Nature is Medicine — Even in a Prison Cell

–by Nalini Nadkarni, syndicated from Yes Magazine, Jul 02, 2018

 excerpt, use link for entire article

“The “Moss-in-Prison” project helped me bring my love for trees and forest to men and women in the deepest windowless reaches of the prison system.

The human environment of hospitals is in many ways similar to those of prisons. The “inmates” of both prisons and hospital wards experience extreme stress and anxiety, as their activities and fate are no longer under their own control. Interior spaces are stark and sterile—for punitive and security reasons for prisoners; for health reasons for patients. Their webs of social interactions are entirely dependent on who might choose to visit them; often these individuals are islands in a frightening sea. Behavioral psychologists have documented that the view of nature outside a window or portrayed on backlit panels can reduce stress and speed recovery. In 2013, I found a maximum security prison in Oregon that was open to the idea of showing nature videos to men in their solitary confinement cellblocks to explore whether this might reduce agitation, anxiety, and the violent infractions that cause injury to inmates and officers. We installed a projector in the exercise room of one of the cellblocks and provided inmates with the opportunity to view the videos during their exercise time—one hour a day, three days a week.

After a year, our surveys and interviews of staff and inmates revealed that they felt lower stress, agitation, and irritability, and were able to carry a “sense of calmness” from seeing the nature video when they returned to their individual cells. Most significantly, we learned that the inmates who viewed nature videos committed twenty-six percent fewer violent infractions than those who did not view them, a convincing result for the prison officers and administrators—and for ourselves. Further work is now needed to learn how this “nature intervention” might work in other prisons, and to understand which elements of nature were most effective in bringing light to the darkest parts of our prison system.

I have been intimate with trees—through the curious eyes of a tree-climbing child, the number-filled notebooks of an academic scientist, the borrowed lenses from people of diverse disciplines and experiences, and most importantly, moving the shuttle of a loom that brings together the intersecting threads of nature and the multiple ways that society comes to perceive and communicate insights about our world. Practicing natural history—and the love that grows organically from that action—is a critical thread in the tapestry that makes up our world, an entity that is complex, connected, useful, strong, fragile, and beautiful.”

 

Links:

https://www.plant-for-the-planet.org/en/home#intro – link to his main website with more information  and if you would like to start your own program and or donate.

https://www.theoceancleanup.com/ – reading about Felix made me think of another young man with ambitions goals to help save this planets oceans from being overrun by plastic, Boyan Slat.

We have some amazing young people rising up on this planet and they give me hope for the future.  Thank you for your courage! Love, hugs and positive vibes for all those stopping by today.  I appreciate your visits!

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3 comments on “2 July 2018 Drawings, Young People Trying to Save the Earth and Nature is Medicine – Even in Prison Cell

  1. You are so right about young people. They give me hope for the future too with their energy and their care for others as the young man in your post. Thank you for this lovely positive post. 🙂

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