16 Jan 2018 A Swamp filled with Lions and Crocodiles (Dream) and Resilience

15 Jan 2018 – Drawing from yesterday. The word Untangled came to mind – the beauty of complete and true spiritual freedom.

Hello to you. It’s 8:39 am as I begin to write to you. It’s 21 degrees, with a feels like of 6 outside right now! Definitely winter here! So how are you? Hopefully you have nutritious food, clothing, shelter, clean water, clean air to breathe and love. Unless someone chooses to go without, I think everyone should have those basic things!

So with it being colder for sleeping, I’ve been dreaming a lot. The dreams aren’t always coherent enough to share but this first one is. It’s very symbolic I think of what it’s like to try and exist in this world.

The dream began with an actual flash of text, “What went wrong?” Then the dream progressed to a family living on a farm surrounded by a swamp populated with large crocodiles (this came from a video we watched recently of a man filming crocs and his friends telling him to run because they were coming after him) and lions (this came from a recent video of seeing a woman being dragged off by a tiger and mauled nearly to death (killed her mom) at one of those animal safari parks and healthy lion cubs being killed in Sweden).

Well if you didn’t time it right, you couldn’t travel because the reptiles would get too close to the house. I actually had a showdown with two of them through a glass door. Someone had left the house and couldn’t come home because of this situation. I remember watching lions trying to climb over the crocodiles without getting bitten. It was a very uneasy relationship.

The symbolism of the dream holds true to the world we live in especially at the upper echelons it seems. I watch these human beings who claim to be civilized barely cooperating, biting each other, mauling and even complete devouring one another just to keep their “stuff” and their power. There is little compassion or empathy it seems – just doing whatever it takes to survive with little regard to collateral damage.  I haven’t lost hope in them though.  Each day I catch glimpses of the leaders and type of people I think they really want to be – people who make this world better for more than just themselves and their kin.  Progress not perfection!

Then there is this. I searched Google and Bing and found this one article that inspired me to believe we are more than just combatants in this world. This is also a great example of resilience. Today’s Daily Good article really ties into what it takes for a veteran like Brandon Dodson and so many others not to completely lose their shit after serving in the military. Resilience is a word that has figured into my own life on more than one occasion. Just when I thought I was broken beyond repair, the God of my understanding and all the accompanying Earth Angels they could send lifted me back up:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/good-news/walls-raised-for-double-amputees-home-in-vista/ar-AAuJwkw?OCID=ansmsnnews11

Walls raised for double amputee’s home in Vista

The “Walls of Honor” event was organized by the Gary Sinise Foundation, which is building the 3,000-square-foot house for Dodson, who lost both legs in Afghanistan in 2014, and his family.

Too many people overvalue what they are not and undervalue what they are.
Malcolm S. Forbes

http://www.dailygood.org/story/1820/the-gifts-of-imperfection-brene-brown/

Be like the bird that, passing on her flight awhile on boughs too slight, feels them give way beneath her, and yet sings, knowing that she hath wings. –Victor Hugo

The Gifts of Imperfection

–by Brene Brown, syndicated from spiritualityandpractice.com, Jan 16, 2018

Let Go of Who You Think You’re Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are

“Resilience — the ability to overcome adversity — has been a growing topic of study since the early 1970s. In a world plagued by stress and struggle, everyone from psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers to clergy and criminal justice researchers want to why and how some folks are better at bouncing back from hardship than others. We want to understand why some people can cope with stress and trauma in a way that allows them to move forward in their lives, and why other people appear more affected and stuck.

“As I collected and analyzed my data, I recognized that many of the people I interviewed were describing stories of resilience. I heard stories about people cultivating Wholehearted lives despite adversity. I learned about people’s capacities to stay mindful and authentic under great stress and anxiety, and I heard people describe how they were able to transform trauma into Wholehearted thriving.

“It wasn’t difficult to recognize these stories as tales of resilience because I was in graduate school during the heyday of resilience research. I knew these narratives were threaded with what we call protective factors — the things we do, have, and practice that give us the bounce.

“What Makes Up Resilience?

“If you look at the current research, here are five of the most common factors of resilient people:

“1. They are resourceful and have good problem-solving skills.

  1. They are more likely to seek help.
  2. They hold the belief that they can do something that will help them to manage their feelings and to cope.
  3. They have social support available to them.
  4. They are connected with others, such as family or friends.

“Of course, there are more factors, depending on the researchers, but these are the big ones.

“At first, I hoped the patterns that I observed in my research would lead to a very straightforward conclusion — resilience is a core component of Wholeheartedness — just like the other guideposts. But there was something more to what I was hearing. The stories had more in common than just resilience; all of these stories were about spirit.

“According to the people I interviewed, the very foundation of the ‘protective factors’ — the things that made them bouncy — was their spirituality. By spirituality, I’m not talking about religion or theology, but I am talking about a shared and deeply held belief. Based on the interviews, here’s how I define spirituality:

“Spirituality is recognizing and celebrating that we are all inextricably connected to each other by a power greater than all of us, and that our connection to that power and to one another is grounded in love and compassion. Practicing spirituality brings a sense of perspective, meaning, and purpose to our lives.

“Without exception, spirituality — the belief in connection, a power greater than self, and interconnections grounded in love and compassion — emerged as a component of resilience. Most people spoke of God, but not everyone. Some were occasional churchgoers; others were not. Some worshipped at fishing holes; others in temples, mosques, or at home. Some struggled with the idea of religion; others were devout members of organized religions. The one thing that they all had in common was spirituality as the foundation of their resilience.

“From this foundation of spirituality, three other significant patterns emerged as being essential to resilience:

“1. Cultivating hope

  1. Practicing critical awareness
  2. Letting go of numbing and taking the edge off vulnerability, discomfort, and pain”

Syndicated from Spirituality & Health magazine. S&H was founded in 1998 for people seeking holistic health in body, mind, and spirit. It aspires to help guide the journey to self-knowledge, authenticity, and integration. Its articles draw from the wisdom of many traditions and cultures, with an emphasis on sharing spiritual practices, and look to science to help provide a context for the spiritual quest. Read more from Spirituality & Health here.

 

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