15 Sept 2017 From pavement to canvas? Some Art isn’t meant to be permanent

Hello to you.  It’s 4:35 pm on this Friday afternoon.  I just finished a drawing outside and the process really helped me with the depression and anxiety I haven’t been able to shake today.  Just one of those sort of days.   It’s ok to have days where your spirit sticks out!

A couple of my friends have expressed interest in my doing one of these chalk drawings for them on a canvas.  Initially I was very flattered about that but then I got flustered inside when I really gave it more thought!  I decided to explain to them, with Kyle’s help as he understands my processes,  that when I am doing these types of drawings on our patio out back, it’s kind of like what Buddhist monks and Native American people do as a spiritual meditation with sand.  The works are not meant to be permanent but just an expression of the spirit….just passing through.  The most permanent my chalk drawings are is with the pictures I take or sometimes, if I really want to keep an image, I’ll draw and color it on paper.  Usually the drawings aren’t as “moving” as the original chalk piece.   So when people ask me to do what I do here on a canvas and for money it gets me flustered inside!   I haven’t ever been able to really get comfortable with getting paid for anything I do of a spiritual nature…..what comes doesn’t belong to me….doesn’t belong to any one person.   So I have talked to the God of my understanding about this matter today, “God do you want me to make money with art?”  and we will see.

Like I explained to my friends, this began as me trying to find a very inexpensive, impermanent way to express myself…to meditate and focus my mind.  Drawing has been, for most of my life, a therapeutic way to get back to center when life scrambles me up.   When I draw outside like I do, I just let it flow and if I draw something I’m not happy with, all I have to do is turn on the water hose and wash it away…..start over!   There is a part of me that is kind of intimidated by  the thought of painting on canvas…..what if I fuck it up?!  LOL!  For those who are artists, painters specifically, you know how expensive a hobby it can be!

One of my friends recently told me she felt my drawings had healing properties so there is a part of me thinking that if I could make some of these images on a canvas and it helped people wouldn’t that be a loving and positive thing?

So we’ll see what answers come now about this dilemma!  Any suggestions (Dymoon?)

Article I found that is a great example of what I am trying to explain about what I do: 

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/sep/13/scc-welcomes-students-back-with-peaceful-ceremony-/

Spokane

SCC welcomes students back with peaceful ceremony led by Tibetan Buddhist monks

Wed., Sept. 13, 2017, 3:17 p.m.

Tibetan Buddhist Monks create a mandala sandpainting in the Lair at Spokane Community College  in March 2003. The painting, made of of million of grains of colored sand, is a circular icon used by Buddhist when they meditate. (Colin Mulvany / The Spokesman-Review)Tibetan Buddhist Monks create a mandala sandpainting in the Lair at Spokane Community College in March 2003. The painting, made of of million of grains of colored sand, is a circular icon used by Buddhist when they meditate. (Colin Mulvany / The Spokesman-Review)

Spokane Community College will begin the school year by bringing focus to world peace with the help of Tibetan Buddhist monks.

Buddhist monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery in Atlanta will gather at noon Tuesday for SCC’s Welcome Week opening ceremony to consecrate the Lair Student Center before beginning the precise creation of a mandala sand painting.

The theme of the presentation is “peace” in honor of International Day of Peace which is Sept. 21. Also that day, the monks will offer a chant for peace at 10:30 a.m. and then will give a lecture on “A Buddhist Approach to Working with Emotions” at 11:30 a.m.

Eleven monks will work in small groups to create the Akshobhya mandala, which means “unshakable victor for conflict resolution and peace,” according to an SCC news release. The sand painting will continue Wednesday and Sept. 21 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. It will be completed from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sept. 22.

A closing ceremony at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 22 will include a walk with the monks to the Spokane River for a ritual where they pour the sand in the river.

“Painting with colored sand ranks as one of the most unique and exquisite. Millions of grains of sand are painstakingly laid into place on a flat platform over a period of days or weeks to form the image of a mandala. To date the monks have created mandala sand paintings in more than 100 museums, art centers, colleges and universities in the United States and Europe,” the release said.

Meaning cosmogram in Sanskrit, the mandala can be created in various media including watercolor on canvas and wood carvings.

“However, the most spectacular and enduringly popular are those made from colored sand,” the release added.


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3 comments on “15 Sept 2017 From pavement to canvas? Some Art isn’t meant to be permanent

    • Thank you very much and how exciting for you to be living in London!!! I visited there and I got the feeling I hadn’t even scratched the surface of the place! My favorite place was Madame Tussauds Wax musem! The chalks are just good ol’ Crayola’s 🙂

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