28 May 2016 Remembering Memorial Day, Girl with the Pear Earring (film), Mulberry Child (PBS special) and Intergenerational Trauma

Hello and Happy Saturday of this Memorial Day Weekend.

I get kind of offended when people say “Happy Memorial Day” to me, especially as a 16 year, now retired, Air Force veteran.  It tells me they do not know or have chosen to forget why the holiday exists in the first place.  There is NOTHING happy about it! Yes, it means well deserved time off of work.  For many overworked and underpaid Americans that is a reason to celebrate, I get that.  Sadly though,  many people get so wrapped up in that aspect of the holiday they all but forget the reason.  Kyle and I plan to make our annual trek to our local cemetary to pay our respects to those who gave their lives for the “why” I abhor so much. War is an abomination to me and since WWII, most wars even happening at all seem to be exercises in futility. Perpetual War for the delusion of Perpetual Peace.

My respects to all those who have served their countries in the role of “peace keepers.”  Some day may be we’ll actually see the full realization of why we raised our hands,  put on uniforms and in many cases used lethal weapons against our brothers and sisters human.  We will see justice for all our comrades who gave (and are still giving) life and limb to do their part to manifest lasting world peace.

Yesterday was an outing day for Kyle and I.  We had our long overdue eye appointment and both of us only required a few minor adjustments!  YAY!  I want to thank Dr. Wise and the staff of the Burleson TX Vision City (http://www.visioncityburleson.com/) for being so caring, so professional and so kind to us and all who walk through their doors.  We are very grateful they are our eye care professionals!  We “see” (yes, pun intended) Dr. Wise he and his staff are fantastic! I got to watch one of his staff members, Michelle, helping an elderly man with some troublesome paint that got on his glasses.  She put some of her elbow grease into removing the pesky paint and adjusting his frames so he didn’t need to buy new ones.  I could tell by watching him, I couldn’t see her face but heard her voice, that she put this man at ease and he was so happy.  He asked her what he owed her and she said, “Just a smile!”

Funny, this phrase would show in in the movie, Girl With the Pearl Earring we would watch later in the evening!  Hmmmm!  A smile is often my currency of choice for the things I do for others too!

Watching Scarlett Johansson as Griet in this film was a feast for my eyes — like watching a painting come to life.  Nearly every scene could have been a painting unto itself!  The story was predictable but I didn’t care – my eyes and my ears were so happy lol.  The music for this film was lovely too.  This film could have been a silent film because there really wasn’t much dialogue used or even needed.  The caliber of the acting talent of the entire cast made this possible.  The director gave the cast the space between the film and the script to put on the finest exhibition of their talents of expression without words.  Hence the “painting come to life” feel of the film I think!  I know this couldn’t have been a simple film to construct but the nature of it was and I want to see more of this type of film.  I’m weary of special effects and gadgets overshadowing the cast of films.  I’ve seen many fantastic films consisting of only a small cast, few sets/costumes and minimal special effects.  I wonder if simplicity I’m describing is why people are returning to the joy of live theater performances?  Anyhew…If you haven’t seen it and love art I highly recommend it.

Girl With a Pearl Earring – Official Trailer

http://www.essentialvermeer.com/catalogue/girl_with_a_pearl_earring.html#.V0men-TmqUk – interesting page that has 9 hot spot focus points with details about the painting by Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer.

This morning we turned the channel to our local PBS channel KERA DFW and had the priviledge of watching the Mulberry Child and ohhh I cried!  It affected me much like one of my favorite books, The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan.  The often painful relationships that can exist between mothers and daughters in the midst of cultural clashes.  Jian Ping’s story comes from the era of the Chinese Cultural Revolution and is an exemplary example for you of the intergenerational trauma
topic I’ve written and talked about in a few of my posts here:

https://saymber.com/2016/04/21/21-april-2016-intergenerational-trauma-and-the-blood-that-remembers-it/
https://saymber.com/2015/03/04/4-march-2015-intergenerational-and-historical-trauma-and-forgiveness/
https://saymber.com/2015/06/26/26-june-2015-the-voices-of-our-ancestors-dhyani-ywahoo-popeular-science-and-some-of-my-recent-wire-jewelry/

http://www.mulberrychild.com/ – Mulberry Child: A Memoir of China by Jian Ping

Mulberry Child is the heart-wrenching true story of a childhood in Communist China.

Jian Ping is the daughter of a senior government official in the rural northeast of the country, growing up at a time of famine and political upheaval in the 1960s. Jian Ping’s innocent childhood comes to an abrupt end when the Cultural Revolution-a power struggle within the ruling party-engulfs the country like a wildfire. Jian Ping’s father, Hou Kai, is falsely accused of treason-he is detained, beaten, and publicly shamed. Her mother Gu Wenxiu, a top administrator of a middle school, is paraded in public and imprisoned by the Revolution Committee and the Red Guards-both driving forces of the Cultural Revolution. She is forbidden to see her children and pressured to divorce her husband. The family is pushed to a breaking point when they are forced to live in a mud house without heating, water, or a toilet. Facing abuse and deprivation, Jian Ping’s family stands steadfastly together, from her aging grandmother Nainai, a frail woman with bound feet, to her parents and siblings. The traumatic impact of their experiences shape the course of their lives forever.

Based on her own memories, as well as interviews and exhaustive research, Mulberry Child is a sprawling family saga and an inspiring tale of resilience and determination, a coming of age story told through the eyes of an innocent child. Mulberry Child allows us an insider’s look into a closed-off world and is written with compassion in honest and intimate language.

http://www.pbs.org/program/mulberry-child/ – you can watch the full film here

That’s it from here for now.  I send my love and hugs to you through the wires!

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2 comments on “28 May 2016 Remembering Memorial Day, Girl with the Pear Earring (film), Mulberry Child (PBS special) and Intergenerational Trauma

  1. I loved the movie too. And I loved the book… it’s absolutely worth to see or to read it. We will remember those who fought for us on monday… and we will light a candle instead the bbq-grill…

    • I am not at all surprised you enjoyed this film and I didn’t know it was a book too! We have a lot in common in our “taste things” for things that make us happy and less stressed out in this world lol. I think lighting a candle is an excellent idea! One for the all and all for one. Love and hugs to you all today!

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